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NEWS
May 12, 1990 | From United Press International
The Polish government scolded Solidarity leader Lech Walesa on Friday for his criticism of Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki's reform program, saying "exposure of political differences does not serve the interests of the country." The remarks by government spokeswoman Malgorzata Niezabitowska came a day after Walesa attacked the government for failing to address the concerns of workers in the Gdansk shipyard, where the Solidarity union was born in 1980.
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BUSINESS
April 6, 1999 | Associated Press
Federal safety regulators cited Avondale Industries for hundreds of alleged workplace safety violations, the most serious involving inadequate protection to keep workers from taking potentially deadly falls. The 437 violations alleged by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration carry $537,000 in proposed fines. The violations were alleged in 60 citations issued by OSHA following a six-month investigation prompted by union complaints. The firm said it will appeal.
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NEWS
August 12, 1988
In another blow to the declining San Diego shipyard that at one time was the largest on the West Coast, union workers at the National Steel & Shipbuilding Co. have gone on strike. About 1,200 workers, led by the Ironworkers Union, marched out of the yard at noon Wednesday. Union leaders called the walkout when Nassco failed to accept their proposal for a new contract last week. Six labor unions have rejected three company proposals over the past year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1991 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Long Beach Naval Shipyard, cited three years ago for exposing its workers to more hazardous conditions than any of the nation's seven other government-owned yards, is under federal investigation again for what one official said are nearly 100 alleged safety violations. Inspectors from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration of the U.S.
NEWS
September 3, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Striking unions have approved a new 49-month contract with the National Steel & Shipbuilding Co., ending a three-week strike at the San Diego shipyard. About 1,000 striking workers are scheduled to return to their jobs on Tuesday. The six unions walked out on Aug. 10 after rejecting three contracts in the last year. The old contract expired on Sept. 30, and a dispute quickly arose over wages and job security. Under the new contract, approved with a 66% majority, journeymen wages were set at $11.
NEWS
September 1, 1988
Six labor unions and the National Steel & Shipbuilding Co. in San Diego have reached agreement on a tentative contract, ending a three-week strike. Under the proposed contract, workers will still earn less than they did 12 months ago. The proposed 49-month contract calls for journeymen to receive $11.40 an hour, followed by two hourly pay increases of 25 cents each in the final two years of the agreement. Unskilled workers would be paid $7 an hour upon ratification.
NEWS
July 12, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The gray steel gates of the Lenin Shipyard, where President Bush spoke on Tuesday, are Poland's most vivid symbol of popular revolt against communism. It was here, in 1980, that workers rose up to demand more say in their own lives; over this fence clambered a militant electrician named Lech Walesa to turn the uprising into a movement called Solidarity. But now the rusty, sprawling plant is about to become a symbol of another kind of change.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1999 | Associated Press
Federal safety regulators cited Avondale Industries for hundreds of alleged workplace safety violations, the most serious involving inadequate protection to keep workers from taking potentially deadly falls. The 437 violations alleged by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration carry $537,000 in proposed fines. The violations were alleged in 60 citations issued by OSHA following a six-month investigation prompted by union complaints. The firm said it will appeal.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Navy bade farewell Monday to 52 Japanese workers who had been brought to its naval shipyard at Long Beach from a U.S. Navy facility in Japan because the service could not find any skilled American workers willing to take temporary jobs at Long Beach. A political furor erupted after union members at the shipyard protested the use of the Japanese workers, who came from the Navy's yard at Yokosuka, Japan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1991 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Long Beach Naval Shipyard, cited three years ago for exposing its workers to more hazardous conditions than any of the nation's seven other government-owned yards, is under federal investigation again for what one official said are nearly 100 alleged safety violations. Inspectors from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration of the U.S.
NEWS
May 12, 1990 | From United Press International
The Polish government scolded Solidarity leader Lech Walesa on Friday for his criticism of Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki's reform program, saying "exposure of political differences does not serve the interests of the country." The remarks by government spokeswoman Malgorzata Niezabitowska came a day after Walesa attacked the government for failing to address the concerns of workers in the Gdansk shipyard, where the Solidarity union was born in 1980.
NEWS
July 12, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The gray steel gates of the Lenin Shipyard, where President Bush spoke on Tuesday, are Poland's most vivid symbol of popular revolt against communism. It was here, in 1980, that workers rose up to demand more say in their own lives; over this fence clambered a militant electrician named Lech Walesa to turn the uprising into a movement called Solidarity. But now the rusty, sprawling plant is about to become a symbol of another kind of change.
NEWS
September 3, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Striking unions have approved a new 49-month contract with the National Steel & Shipbuilding Co., ending a three-week strike at the San Diego shipyard. About 1,000 striking workers are scheduled to return to their jobs on Tuesday. The six unions walked out on Aug. 10 after rejecting three contracts in the last year. The old contract expired on Sept. 30, and a dispute quickly arose over wages and job security. Under the new contract, approved with a 66% majority, journeymen wages were set at $11.
NEWS
September 1, 1988
Six labor unions and the National Steel & Shipbuilding Co. in San Diego have reached agreement on a tentative contract, ending a three-week strike. Under the proposed contract, workers will still earn less than they did 12 months ago. The proposed 49-month contract calls for journeymen to receive $11.40 an hour, followed by two hourly pay increases of 25 cents each in the final two years of the agreement. Unskilled workers would be paid $7 an hour upon ratification.
NEWS
August 12, 1988
In another blow to the declining San Diego shipyard that at one time was the largest on the West Coast, union workers at the National Steel & Shipbuilding Co. have gone on strike. About 1,200 workers, led by the Ironworkers Union, marched out of the yard at noon Wednesday. Union leaders called the walkout when Nassco failed to accept their proposal for a new contract last week. Six labor unions have rejected three company proposals over the past year.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1988 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
Private shipyards are grabbing an increasing share of the warship repair and overhaul business from the Long Beach Naval Shipyard and its seven counterparts around the nation, a new federal study reports. The study by the General Accounting Office casts doubt on the Navy's claims that taxpayers have saved $200 million from competition between public and private shipyards. There are perceived savings, but just how much is difficult to estimate.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1988 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
Private shipyards are grabbing an increasing share of the warship repair and overhaul business from the Long Beach Naval Shipyard and its seven counterparts around the nation, a new federal study reports. The study by the General Accounting Office casts doubt on the Navy's claims that taxpayers have saved $200 million from competition between public and private shipyards. There are perceived savings, but just how much is difficult to estimate.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Navy bade farewell Monday to 52 Japanese workers who had been brought to its naval shipyard at Long Beach from a U.S. Navy facility in Japan because the service could not find any skilled American workers willing to take temporary jobs at Long Beach. A political furor erupted after union members at the shipyard protested the use of the Japanese workers, who came from the Navy's yard at Yokosuka, Japan.
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