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Shipbuilding Layoffs

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1989 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
The Long Beach Naval Shipyard won a $25-million federal contract Tuesday to overhaul the Navy destroyer Callaghan, canceling the planned layoff of 600 workers. Officials said, however, that a separate plan to eliminate 200 shipyard jobs in a reorganization to streamline operations at the Terminal Island facility will go forward. The Navy's decision to award the Callaghan contract to the federally owned shipyard was hailed as a sign that it could successfully compete with private companies for the prized Navy contracts.
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BUSINESS
June 18, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Shipyard Layoffs: National Steel & Shipbuilding Co. of San Diego said it will lay off 300 workers, or about 8% of its work force, beginning this month because it will soon deliver on its sole commercial shipbuilding contract and has no others lined up. On July 15, NASSCO will deliver the $129-million cargo ship R. J. Pfeiffer to Matson Navigation of San Francisco, the only commercial vessel under construction in the United States.
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BUSINESS
June 18, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Shipyard Layoffs: National Steel & Shipbuilding Co. of San Diego said it will lay off 300 workers, or about 8% of its work force, beginning this month because it will soon deliver on its sole commercial shipbuilding contract and has no others lined up. On July 15, NASSCO will deliver the $129-million cargo ship R. J. Pfeiffer to Matson Navigation of San Francisco, the only commercial vessel under construction in the United States.
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the Henriques Boat Works in Bayville, N.J., a small, family-owned firm north of Atlantic City that specializes in luxury sports fishing boats, workers are completing what may well be the last three vessels the company ever turns out. A six-month-old federal luxury tax, approved by Congress as part of a five-year, $500-billion deficit-reduction package, is getting the blame at Henriques and at boatyards around the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1989 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
The commander of the Long Beach Naval Shipyard has recommended layoffs at the sprawling Terminal Island facility that would pare the work force by about 750 within three months, it was disclosed Tuesday. If approved by the Pentagon, the latest in a series of reductions would leave the shipyard with about 3,900 workers--well below a peak of more than 7,000 five years ago, when the yard was busy renovating the battleship Missouri and repairing other ships. Once the second-largest employer in Long Beach, behind McDonnell Douglas Corp.
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the Henriques Boat Works in Bayville, N.J., a small, family-owned firm north of Atlantic City that specializes in luxury sports fishing boats, workers are completing what may well be the last three vessels the company ever turns out. A six-month-old federal luxury tax, approved by Congress as part of a five-year, $500-billion deficit-reduction package, is getting the blame at Henriques and at boatyards around the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1989 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
The Long Beach Naval Shipyard won a $25-million federal contract Tuesday to overhaul the Navy destroyer Callaghan, canceling the planned layoff of 600 workers. Officials said, however, that a separate plan to eliminate 200 shipyard jobs in a reorganization to streamline operations at the Terminal Island facility will go forward. The Navy's decision to award the Callaghan contract to the federally owned shipyard was hailed as a sign that it could successfully compete with private companies for the prized Navy contracts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1989 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
The commander of the Long Beach Naval Shipyard has recommended layoffs at the sprawling Terminal Island facility that would pare the work force by about 750 within three months, it was disclosed Tuesday. If approved by the Pentagon, the latest in a series of reductions would leave the shipyard with about 3,900 workers--well below a peak of more than 7,000 five years ago, when the yard was busy renovating the battleship Missouri and repairing other ships. Once the second-largest employer in Long Beach, behind McDonnell Douglas Corp.
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