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Shipley Nature Center

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NEWS
April 28, 1990 | Clipboard researched by Kathie Bozanich and Elena Brunet / Los Angeles Times, Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
It is not difficult to find Central Park in Huntington Beach, a 300-acre expanse of green that has become the city park system's pride and joy. Nestled among its pathways twists and curves, however, is something more difficult to locate but a pleasure to happen upon--the Shipley Nature Center. The center is filled with exhibits, facts and figures detailing nature's part in local history. One exhibit includes the nests and models of some of the 200 species of birds found in Central Park.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2003 | Dave McKibben, Times Staff Writer
Almost a year after closing its doors because of budget cuts, the Shipley Nature Center in Huntington Beach reopened its 18-acre preserve to the public Sunday to the delight of bird lovers and fans of native vegetation. "You can hear the wind, feel the breeze, and listen to the birds," said John Dinnyes of Fountain Valley. "That's really the life for us city people."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2000
Shipley Nature Center, a quiet eight-acre retreat within a remote area of Huntington Central Park, is a unique preserve open to the public year-round. It is in jeopardy of having nonnative vegetation overrun the native plant life. If that happens, the center will be less likely to support native species of flora and fauna. In addition to the estimated 290 bird species that live and visit the center, there are crayfish and red-eared slider turtles living in the freshwater pond, as well as coyotes, raccoons, skunks, mice, gopher snakes, king snakes, western fence lizards, alligator lizards and dragonflies inhabiting the center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2000
Shipley Nature Center, a quiet eight-acre retreat within a remote area of Huntington Central Park, is a unique preserve open to the public year-round. It is in jeopardy of having nonnative vegetation overrun the native plant life. If that happens, the center will be less likely to support native species of flora and fauna. In addition to the estimated 290 bird species that live and visit the center, there are crayfish and red-eared slider turtles living in the freshwater pond, as well as coyotes, raccoons, skunks, mice, gopher snakes, king snakes, western fence lizards, alligator lizards and dragonflies inhabiting the center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1999 | Kathleen Haney, (714) 965-7172
A proposal to clear decaying trees and plant new ones at the Shipley Nature Center has been voted down by the City Council. Councilman Tom Harman said beetles have destroyed many of the Monterey pines that cover four acres of the 18-acre nature site, across from the Park Bench Cafe on Golden West Street. He suggested clearing the area and developing a program for residents to dedicate trees in memory of a loved one or for community service projects.
NEWS
December 10, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, Rick VanderKnyff is a free-lance writer who regularly contributes to The Times Orange County Edition. and
Shipley Nature Center in Huntington Beach is something that most parks aren't: overgrown, chaotic, dense with vegetation. This unkempt corner of Huntington Central Park is a welcome counterpoint to the newly mowed neatness of most county parks. Back in the old days, we had a name for places like this: vacant lots, those bits of undeveloped land where kids could explore nature on their own terms.
MAGAZINE
June 24, 1990 | ROBIN TUCKER and Shipley Nature Center, Central Park Drive off Edwards St., Huntington Beach; ( 714 ) 960-8847.
EVEN PARK naturalist Dave Winkler admits that people may have trouble finding the Shipley Nature Center; but once you've found the parking lot, the signs will show you the way. Set in the middle of a 350-acre park, the 18-acre nature center is, according to Winkler, "riparian" (stream-side) woodland. Huntington Beach was once a swamp, but the water today, according to Winkler, is under the ground surface.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2003 | Dave McKibben, Times Staff Writer
Almost a year after closing its doors because of budget cuts, the Shipley Nature Center in Huntington Beach reopened its 18-acre preserve to the public Sunday to the delight of bird lovers and fans of native vegetation. "You can hear the wind, feel the breeze, and listen to the birds," said John Dinnyes of Fountain Valley. "That's really the life for us city people."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2000
Huntington Beach Councilman Peter M. Green's July 30 letter is way off the mark. His argument that the Shipley Nature Center has been left out of the Little Shell debate is ludicrous. He claims that Little Shell, a saltwater wetland, is a nonfunctioning site. He is wrong. Little Shell is a functioning wetland. The water from the larger wetland on the other side of Beach Boulevard flows through a pipe under the boulevard to replenish Little Shell with each high tide. As a biology teacher he should know that you can't duplicate a saltwater wetland four miles away at the nature center or anywhere out of the coastal zone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1995
Huntington Central Park was a busy place last year. Huntington Beach park rangers responded to 1,455 service calls and issued 451 citations at the park, which is bordered roughly by Gothard and Edwards streets, Taylor Drive and Slater Avenue. Rangers also responded to 60 medical aid calls. The park also was a popular place for special activities: 122 reservations were made that generated $14,250 in revenue for the city. Shipley Nature Center had 36,240 visitors, including 8,025 for nature tours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1999 | Kathleen Haney, (714) 965-7172
A proposal to clear decaying trees and plant new ones at the Shipley Nature Center has been voted down by the City Council. Councilman Tom Harman said beetles have destroyed many of the Monterey pines that cover four acres of the 18-acre nature site, across from the Park Bench Cafe on Golden West Street. He suggested clearing the area and developing a program for residents to dedicate trees in memory of a loved one or for community service projects.
NEWS
December 10, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, Rick VanderKnyff is a free-lance writer who regularly contributes to The Times Orange County Edition. and
Shipley Nature Center in Huntington Beach is something that most parks aren't: overgrown, chaotic, dense with vegetation. This unkempt corner of Huntington Central Park is a welcome counterpoint to the newly mowed neatness of most county parks. Back in the old days, we had a name for places like this: vacant lots, those bits of undeveloped land where kids could explore nature on their own terms.
MAGAZINE
June 24, 1990 | ROBIN TUCKER and Shipley Nature Center, Central Park Drive off Edwards St., Huntington Beach; ( 714 ) 960-8847.
EVEN PARK naturalist Dave Winkler admits that people may have trouble finding the Shipley Nature Center; but once you've found the parking lot, the signs will show you the way. Set in the middle of a 350-acre park, the 18-acre nature center is, according to Winkler, "riparian" (stream-side) woodland. Huntington Beach was once a swamp, but the water today, according to Winkler, is under the ground surface.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | Clipboard researched by Kathie Bozanich and Elena Brunet / Los Angeles Times, Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
It is not difficult to find Central Park in Huntington Beach, a 300-acre expanse of green that has become the city park system's pride and joy. Nestled among its pathways twists and curves, however, is something more difficult to locate but a pleasure to happen upon--the Shipley Nature Center. The center is filled with exhibits, facts and figures detailing nature's part in local history. One exhibit includes the nests and models of some of the 200 species of birds found in Central Park.
NEWS
September 3, 1988 | Clipboard researched by Henry Rivero and Rick VanderKnyff / Los Angeles Times Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
Location: Between Slater and Talbert avenues from Golden West Street east to Gothard Street, and west of Golden West between Galicia Lane and Taylor Drive, Huntington Beach. Description: The park's 216 acres include manicured areas and areas of dense natural vegetation in the heart of Huntington Beach. Eventually, the park will encompass 350 acres when development of the southernmost area is complete.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1991
Unusual Bird Sightings--Fall is in full swing, as is the migration season for birds. The Sea & Sage chapter of the National Audubon Society reports there have been several rare birds sightings thus far. A sulphur-bellied flycatcher was seen at the Shipley Nature Center in Huntington Central Park in mid-September. It was the first recorded sighting in Orange County and one of the few statewide.
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