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NATIONAL
August 7, 2013 | By Rick Rojas
SEATTLE - On a narrow central Idaho highway coursing through thickets of ponderosa pines and along a winding river, members of the Nez Perce tribe made their stand. Hundreds gathered along U.S. Highway 12 on Monday and Tuesday and formed a human blockade in an attempt to stop a controversial megaload of equipment bound for the oil tar sands of Alberta, Canada - a load reportedly weighing about 644,000 pounds and stretching over 200 feet. They intended on continuing their protests Wednesday and Thursday nights.
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WORLD
January 7, 2014 | By Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT - The initial consignment of Syria's most toxic chemical weapons material was shipped out of the country Tuesday, international officials said, advancing a cleanup effort widely seen as a success in the midst of a long civil war that has cost more than 100,000 lives. The announcement came as the leader of an Al Qaeda-linked rebel group tried to broker a cease-fire among Syrian opposition factions that have been battling one another. A "first quantity" of so-called priority chemical materials was moved from two sites to the Syrian port of Latakia and loaded onto a Danish commercial vessel, Sigrid Kaag, who heads the international effort to rid the country of its chemical arsenal, said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
July 13, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The MacBook Pro with Retina, the star of last month's Worldwide Developers Conference, has finally seen an improvement to its shipping time from Apple's online store. After launching June 11, the MacBook Pro with Retina quickly sold out and saw its shipping time jump up to an estimated waiting time of three to four week before arrival. Now that time has finally been cut, but sadly, it's just a slight improvement of one week. MacRumors reported the improvement late last night, saying the change was first seen in Apple's Asia-Pacific market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2013 | By Frank Shyong
A 30-day delay in the distribution of Sriracha and two other hot sauces manufactured by Huy Fong Foods has some suppliers of Asian food worried about meeting consumer demand. The manufacturer cannot ship any more of its product until mid-January because the California Department of Public Health has begun enforcing stricter guidelines for the company. Damon Chu, president of wholesale Asian food supplier Giant Union in Whittier, says his company could lose about $300,000 in sales as a result of the state agency's action.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1985
The final shipment to Europe of Volkswagen's legendary "bug," the biggest-selling car of all time, was unloaded at the port of Emden, West Germany. The company is withdrawing the model from the European market because of falling sales. More than 20.6 million Beetles have been built, 8 million of which are thought to be still on the road, a spokesman said. The final 3,000 cars for Europe were made in Mexico.
NEWS
August 20, 1987 | SARA FRITZ and KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writers
CIA counterterrorism chief Duane (Dewey) Clarridge has acknowledged that he made logistical plans for arms shipments to Iran in late 1985, even after being told by superiors that his actions were illegal without the explicit approval of President Reagan, according to testimony released Wednesday by Congress' Iran- contra committees. Clarridge's testimony, taken by the committees in closed session Aug.
NATIONAL
July 10, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Customs agents discovered an extra ingredient in a shipment of Colombian coffee: nearly half a ton of cocaine. U.S. Customs Officer Troy Simon said that Monday's cocaine find was his agency's biggest at the Port of New Orleans since more than 2 tons turned up in a transformer shipment about 10 years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1986 | DAVID FERRELL, Times Staff Writer
Pamela Cury was bringing a shipment--some of Latin America's finest--from Guatemala into Los Angeles. " Primo stuff," she called it. "It was absolutely like gold." The cargo was shrimp, more than 29,000 pounds of top-grade, pond-raised jumbos, miniatures and all sizes in between, frozen in ice, loaded on a trailer rig and headed for a market near you. But then, on Friday, the $157,000 load reached a U.S. Customs Service facility in South Gate.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2012 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
A Santa Monica start-up wants to take the financial pain out of shaving. Dollar Shave Club is a new membership-only website that promises to "shave time, shave money" by sending customers a shipment of razor blades automatically every month. The company estimates that it will save members as much as $292 a year on shaving. "For a very long time people have been flummoxed by the price of brand-name razors, so they hang on to their blades for longer than they should and milk their blades," company co-founder and Chief Executive Michael Dubin said.
NATIONAL
November 27, 2010 | By Jordan Steffen, Tribune Washington Bureau
A shipment of radioactive rods that went missing Thanksgiving Day was found Friday in Tennessee by the shipping company FedEx. Though the materials, used for medical equipment, posed little threat to the public, the misplaced shipment underscores the need to track low-hazard materials that could be used in small-scale terrorist attacks, experts say. The rods, used to calibrate quality control in CT scans, contain little energy and a low...
WORLD
December 4, 2013 | By Zulfiqar Ali, Aoun Sahi and Mark Magnier
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- Demonstrators at a protest camp cheered and chanted Wednesday as word spread that the Pentagon was suspending all truck shipments to and from Afghanistan through Pakistan following the activists' weeklong efforts to disrupt the trade. “Our workers protest has forced the U.S. to stop shipment of goods through Pakistan,” Khalid Masood, provincial general secretary of the Tehreek-e-Insaf party that has led the campaign, said as he sat at the camp set up at a toll plaza on the main highway in Peshawar.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2013 | By David Pierson
China recently rejected a 60,000-ton shipment of American corn because it included unapproved genetically modified grain, the country's food-quality watchdog said. The shipment was halted in the southern port city of Shenzhen, near Hong Kong, after it was discovered to contain MIR162, a special insect-resistant variety of maize developed by Syngenta, a Swiss maker of seeds and pesticides, according to Chinese state media . MIR162 is not on the Chinese government's short list of approved grains considered genetically modified organisms, or GMO. China has increasingly turned to GMO imports to help meet its growing food demand.  Beijing approved permits for three varieties of GMO soybeans in June, including strains developed by U.S. seed giant Monsanto and Germany's BASF, according to the Wall Street Journal . Still, Chinese consumers remain wary of GMO crops and some nationalist-leaning pundits have suggested the Western-dominated technology leaves China's food supply vulnerable.
WORLD
November 29, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Jamaican authorities have seized 3,300 warheads and a missile-making machine at the port of Kingston and sought help from international police in tracking the shipper, Jamaican media reported Friday. The unauthorized arms shipment was discovered Thursday afternoon in a police and customs operation carried out at a berth of Kingston Wharves, the RJR News site reported. A high-level investigation has been launched, and Jamaican police have asked for assistance from international law enforcement, the news service said.
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
It's officially a trend. A few days ago Les Marchands Wine Bar & Merchant in Santa Barbara launched its SOMM Series Wine Club for highly allocated wines. And now Michael Mina and his longtime wine director and sommelier Rajat Parr have started their own high-end wine club called - what else? - the Michael Mina Wine Club .  Since Mina owns 18 restaurants across the country, the idea is to offer members bottles from the wine lists of Mina's restaurants, thereby giving members access to hard-to-find wines from small producers around the world.  Who's picking, or rather, curating the wines?
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
Brian McClintic and Eric Railsback may be accomplished sommeliers, but they're also pretty savvy about marketing themselves and their new Santa Barbara venture Les Marchands Wine Bar & Merchant .  The first week they opened the shop in early August the two hosted the annual Santa Barbara County Wine Futures tasting - and 50 or so winemakers without a hitch. How can you not want to patronize a wine shop that offers a “Riesling and Ramen” night?  McClintic was one of the four Master Sommelier hopefuls in the documentary SOMM.
NATIONAL
August 7, 2013 | By Rick Rojas
SEATTLE - On a narrow central Idaho highway coursing through thickets of ponderosa pines and along a winding river, members of the Nez Perce tribe made their stand. Hundreds gathered along U.S. Highway 12 on Monday and Tuesday and formed a human blockade in an attempt to stop a controversial megaload of equipment bound for the oil tar sands of Alberta, Canada - a load reportedly weighing about 644,000 pounds and stretching over 200 feet. They intended on continuing their protests Wednesday and Thursday nights.
NEWS
February 10, 1987 | Associated Press
Police seized 1 1/2 tons of hashish worth more than $6 million hidden in a shipment of furniture at the port of Aqaba, newspapers reported Monday.
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
Brian McClintic and Eric Railsback may be accomplished sommeliers, but they're also pretty savvy about marketing themselves and their new Santa Barbara venture Les Marchands Wine Bar & Merchant .  The first week they opened the shop in early August the two hosted the annual Santa Barbara County Wine Futures tasting - and 50 or so winemakers without a hitch. How can you not want to patronize a wine shop that offers a “Riesling and Ramen” night?  McClintic was one of the four Master Sommelier hopefuls in the documentary SOMM.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Global tablet sales slowed during the second quarter, and Apple's decision not to release a new iPad may be the reason why. After 49.2 million tablets were shipped during this year's first quarter, only 45.1 million were shipped during the second quarter, a period Apple has typically used to launch new iPad models. Last year, Apple decided to launch a new iPad closer to the holiday shopping season, and it seems the company plans to do the same this year. That switch-up, however, caused the entire industry's tablet shipments to fall nearly 10% from the first to the second quarter of 2013, according to the International Data Corp . PHOTOS: Top tablets under $200 "A new iPad launch always piques consumer interest in the tablet category and traditionally that has helped both Apple and its competitors," said Tom Mainelli, IDC's tablets research director, in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2013 | By Hugh Hart
Twitter, text-messaging, email, apps, social media and an ever-proliferating stampede of wireless devices have colonized pretty much every form of communication that can be digitized. Yet one contrarian Los Angeles company believes slow but steady snail mail wins the race when it comes to deepening connections between online gurus and their followers. Billing itself as a "subscription service for wonderful things," Quarterly delivers mystery boxes the old-fashioned way - through the U.S. Postal Service.
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