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NEWS
July 30, 2010
The Food and Drug Administration said Friday that it has approved seasonal influenza vaccines produced by six manufacturers and at least two of the companies said they have already begun or will soon begin shipping the vaccines to U.S. customers. The vaccine protects against the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus that caused an uproar last winter, as well as two other strains of influenza that are not as widespread but that nonetheless can be a problem. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices in February changed its recommendations for who should receive the shots.
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WORLD
April 21, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - In a fresh reminder of the unresolved wartime grievances between China and Japan, authorities in Shanghai have seized a Japanese ship over claims dating back to the 1930s. Mitsui O.S.K. Lines said Monday that one of its iron ore carriers, the Baosteel Emotion, was impounded Saturday. Japan's top government spokesman, Yoshihide Suga, denounced the move, saying it could have a “chilling effect” on all Japanese companies doing business in China. “We are deeply apprehensive,” he added.
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NATIONAL
July 1, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The shipping lanes in and out of Boston Harbor will be narrowed and shifted north today in a bid to lower the risk of ships killing rare right whales. The entire North Atlantic right whale population is estimated at just 350. It's the first time in U.S. history that shipping lanes have been changed to protect wildlife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2014 | By A Times Staff Writer
Two newborn kittens were accidentally shipped from Los Angeles to San Diego in small black boxes this week. The kittens were discovered with their umbilical cords still attached by Cox cable company employees in Chula Vista as part of a shipment of fiberglass equipment, according to 10 News in San Diego.  "They were very, very lucky that they didn't fall out of it in transport or when we were unloading the truck," Cox employee JC Collins told the station. The Humane Society's local chapter was called to care for the kittens.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2008 | Alana Semuels
If hearing seven versions of "Silent Night" in six stores is enough to drive you to drink, you're probably among the millions of people who have ditched the mall for your mouse. Shopping online is expected to be more popular than ever this year, and with consumers minding their pennies, free shipping is expected to be a big deal this holiday season. "The economy will drive more people online to look for the best prices," said Kurt Peters, editor-in-chief of Internet Retailer. Forrester Research analyst Sucharita Mulpuru predicts that consumers will spend $44 billion online in November and December, a 12% increase compared with last year.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2002 | Nancy Cleeland
Longshore union officials denied they were violating court orders by orchestrating slowdowns at West Coast docks, and told the Justice Department that the blame for continuing backlogs of cargo lies with the shipping lines. "The fact is our workers are ready, willing and able to work," said James Spinosa, president of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, which has been in contract talks with the Pacific Maritime Assn., representing the shipping industry.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2002 | Melinda Fulmer
President Bush signed into law a Justice Department appropriations bill that includes a provision allowing wine purchased at wineries to be shipped to customers' home states even if those states prohibit direct shipments of alcohol. The provision was inserted by a bipartisan group including Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and Rep. Elton Gallegly (R-Simi Valley).
NEWS
February 17, 1991
The SUEZ CANAL, one of Egypt's main sources of foreign exchange, is losing revenue because of the Persian Gulf War. The Middle East News Agency said that traffic in the waterway, which links the Mediterranean and the Red Sea, fell by 12% after the invasion of Kuwait. The average daily tonnage passing through the canal since the war started is 780,000; in 1990, the average was 1.1 million tons. On Feb. 2, only 123,000 tons of shipping passed through--the lowest one-day total in 12 years.
WORLD
December 18, 2009 | By Margot Roosevelt
With a day left, negotiators at the Copenhagen climate conference are making a final push to resolve one of the thorniest issues: how to control skyrocketing emissions from international aviation and maritime shipping. The European Union, several African nations, Norway, Mexico and Australia have proposed an international cap-and-trade system covering ships and airlines that could raise as much as $25 billion a year. That money then could be used to help the poorest nations shift to renewable energy, slow deforestation and adapt to climate change.
NEWS
June 7, 1994
Container ship: carries cargo containers, generally 8x8x20 feet; containersare stacked aboard ship, then transferred to trains or trucks; largest container ships can hold about 12,000 metric tons of cargo. Dry bulk carrier: hauls cargo such as grain, ore or sand. General cargo ship: carries "packaged" items, such as chemicals, foods, furniture, machinery. Multipurpose ship: carries different classes of cargo at the same time, liquid or dry.
OPINION
April 15, 2014 | By Michael Moran
A bitter debate has raged in the Pentagon for several months about the wisdom of taking the nuclear aircraft carrier George Washington out of service to save money. The Washington, at 24 years old a relatively young vessel, is due for a costly refit, a routine procedure that all of the 11 large carriers in service undergo regularly. The Navy fought hard against mothballing the giant ship. But Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has warned that when the two-year reprieve Congress granted from sequester cuts expires in 2016, the George Washington will be back on the chopping block.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Majestic tall ships will parade through L.A.'s harbor and dock for five days in August for the first time since 2008 during the Tall Ships Festival 2014. Visitors can spend a day sailing aboard one of the historic ships, take a tour while they're in port, and learn how to rig one during the festival. Tickets went on sale this week for the Aug. 20-24 event that will feature more than a dozen tall ships, including the Irving Johnson and the Exy Johnson, the city's official tall ships.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - A cruise ship from Los Angeles pulled into San Diego Thursday morning with several dozen passengers sick with flu-like symptoms. Most of the passengers on the Crown Princess will enjoy a day of shopping and sightseeing in San Diego. But a reported 83 passengers who are sick will remain on the ship, according to the cruise line. The illness could be Novovirus, which causes diarrhea and vomiting, is a highly contagious viral infection and, according to the San Diego County Health Department, is common to people living in close quarters, such as "nursing homes or cruise ships.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Tony Perry, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
SAN DIEGO -- The sick baby whose rescue at sea required the assistance of the Coast Guard, Navy, and Air National Guard is set to return to San Diego on Wednesday aboard the Navy ship Vandegrift. The girl's condition has stabilized, officials said. Eric and Charlotte Kaufman and their two daughters will disembark when the ship docks at Naval Air Station North Island to take on ordnance for an upcoming deployment. RELATED: Parents of sick 1-year-old defend sailing trip after Navy rescue [Updated, 9:05 a.m. April 9: The ship will then sail across San Diego Bay to its home port at the 32 nd Street Naval Station, where dozens of journalists will await.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - The guided-missile frigate Vandegrift returned here Wednesday with 15 officers, 190 enlisted sailors and a sick baby named Lyra. The 1-year-old's rescue from her family's crippled sailboat hundreds of miles out at sea was accomplished by a joint effort of the Coast Guard, California Air National Guard, and, finally, the Navy, which redirected the Vandegrift from its training mission off Southern California. Eric and Charlotte Kaufman and their two daughters - Lyra and 3-year-old Cora - disembarked at the Naval Air Station North Island when the ship docked to take on ordnance for an upcoming anti-drug-smuggling deployment off South America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- The sick baby rescued from a crippled sailboat hundreds of miles at sea is in stable condition aboard the frigate Vandegrift, which is set to return to its home port here Wednesday, officials announced Monday afternoon. The 1-year-old girl was suffering from a high fever and a severe rash when her parents made a distress call Thursday to the Coast Guard. By Thursday night, four men from the California Air National Guard trained as paramedics had parachuted into the ocean and were aboard the sailboat.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A ship's captain was convicted at a bench trial in Norfolk of operating a commercial vessel while drunk and banished from U.S. waters for one year. U.S. Magistrate James E. Bradberry also fined Janos Gyori, 52, $3,000 for the Jan. 11 incident in which the 214-foot freighter General Lee was denied entry to the Port of Hampton Roads. A Coast Guard crew conducting a security check found the captain intoxicated.
WORLD
December 15, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A cargo ship carrying nearly 2,900 luxury cars capsized and sank after colliding with another cargo ship in the English Channel. There were no injuries. In heavy fog, the Norwegian-registered Tricolor collided with the Bahamas-registered container ship Kariba about 30 miles east of Ramsgate, southeastern England, said Britain's Maritime and Coastguard Agency. The Tricolor was carrying 2,862 cars -- high-end BMWs, Volvos and Saabs -- all believed lost.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
The Navy plans to install a laser weapon prototype on a ship this summer for at-sea testing in the Persian Gulf. The technology, called the Laser Weapon System, will be the first of its kind to be deployed, the Navy said. The idea is that the laser could zap dangerous swarming small boats and flying drones while on the USS Ponce in the Persian Gulf. Its power also can be scaled down, presenting the Navy a non-lethal alternative to ward off threats such as pirates, terrorists and smugglers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2014 | By Tony Perry, This post has been updated. See below for details.
[Updated 9 a.m. PDT: A sick 1-year-old baby aboard a crippled sailboat hundreds of miles at sea off the Mexican coast was transferred to a Navy ship early Sunday, officials said. The frigate Vandegrift arrived on scene around midnight but the transfer of the child was delayed until daylight Sunday morning for safety reasons. ] The Vandegrift has two Navy corpsmen aboard, officials said. Also, four rescue specialists from the California Air National Guard's 129th Rescue Wing had been with the child aboard the family's sailboat since late Thursday.
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