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NEWS
October 8, 1992 | LEE DYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The second-largest glacier in North America has entered a "catastrophic retreat" phase, scientists say, and is disgorging giant icebergs that could endanger shipping in the Gulf of Alaska, including tankers traveling to and from the oil port of Valdez. The largest of the icebergs, some as long as five football fields, currently are trapped inside a lake at the foot of the Bering Glacier and only smaller bergs are able to travel down a shallow outlet to enter the gulf.
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NATIONAL
July 8, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Passengers aboard a cruise ship were left high and dry Monday for about nine hours after the vessel went aground near Glacier Bay National Park in southeastern Alaska. A Coast Guard boat towed the 207-foot Spirit of Glacier Bay on a rising tide to the middle of the bay late Monday afternoon, said Coast Guard spokesman Lt. Eric Eggen. The cruise ship, with 24 passengers and 27 crew members, ran aground at 7:12 a.m., said Jerrol Golden, spokeswoman for Cruise West Enterprises, which owns the ship.
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NEWS
March 31, 1989 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
Oil and gasoline prices jumped higher and supplies tightened on the West Coast on Thursday as Atlantic Richfield, Exxon and British Petroleum all announced refinery cutbacks and said they were unable to ship enough crude from Alaska to meet the needs of their customers. The sudden interruption of Alaskan crude oil shipments in the wake of last week's big oil spill drove some wholesale prices up by the hour.
NEWS
April 4, 2002 | From Associated Press
The Exxon Valdez should be allowed to return to Alaska's Prince William Sound, where it spilled 11 million gallons of oil in 1989, the tanker's owner told an appeals court Wednesday. The Exxon Valdez, which now sails between the Middle East and Asia, has been barred from the sound since 1990, when Congress passed the Oil Pollution Act. The act prohibits any tanker that has spilled more than 1 million gallons since March 22, 1989, from entering Prince William Sound. Lawyer E.
NEWS
April 4, 2002 | From Associated Press
The Exxon Valdez should be allowed to return to Alaska's Prince William Sound, where it spilled 11 million gallons of oil in 1989, the tanker's owner told an appeals court Wednesday. The Exxon Valdez, which now sails between the Middle East and Asia, has been barred from the sound since 1990, when Congress passed the Oil Pollution Act. The act prohibits any tanker that has spilled more than 1 million gallons since March 22, 1989, from entering Prince William Sound. Lawyer E.
TRAVEL
August 23, 1987 | SHIRLEY SLATER and HARRY BASCH, Slater and Basch are Los Angeles free-lance writers
If the energetic folks of British Columbia have their way, what people call the Alaska cruise may soon become the Canada and Alaska cruise. For starters, there is Canada Place, the magnificent harbor-front pavilion built for Expo '86 that is now serving as Vancouver's strikingly handsome cruise ship port.
NATIONAL
July 8, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Passengers aboard a cruise ship were left high and dry Monday for about nine hours after the vessel went aground near Glacier Bay National Park in southeastern Alaska. A Coast Guard boat towed the 207-foot Spirit of Glacier Bay on a rising tide to the middle of the bay late Monday afternoon, said Coast Guard spokesman Lt. Eric Eggen. The cruise ship, with 24 passengers and 27 crew members, ran aground at 7:12 a.m., said Jerrol Golden, spokeswoman for Cruise West Enterprises, which owns the ship.
NEWS
September 24, 1986 | United Press International
A Soviet spy ship retrieved a bag of garbage dumped by the U.S. aircraft carrier Constellation, apparently to probe for secrets, but got only "food, Coke cans and the garbage of 5,000 men," the Navy said Tuesday. "We were in typical fashion getting rid of our garbage," senior intelligence officer Joe Mazzafro said in an interview aboard ship. Garbage is put in plastic bags, punched through with holes to make it sink, and discarded, he said.
NEWS
April 24, 1989 | From Times wire services
A Soviet oil-skimming ship sent with great fanfare to help contain the Alaskan oil spill has been beaten back by stormy seas and slowed by its own technical shortcomings, the U.S. Coast Guard said today. "To date, it's (the Soviet ship) not been very successful," Coast Guard Capt. Glen Haines told a public meeting on Exxon Corp.'s progress in handling the worst oil spill in U.S. history. He said the 435-foot Vaydagubski, the world's largest oil-skimming vessel, has been forced to enter the coastal port at Surprise Bay because of gale-force winds and rough seas that brought to a near halt oil spill operations in open waters over the weekend.
NATIONAL
May 17, 2005 | David G. Savage and Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writers
The Supreme Court opened the way Monday for vintners to sell their wines directly to consumers across the nation, a major victory for California's $15 billion-a-year wine industry. The 5-4 decision struck down laws in New York and Michigan on the grounds that they discriminated against out-of-state wineries by prohibiting them from selling directly to consumers while letting local vintners do so.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | LEE DYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The second-largest glacier in North America has entered a "catastrophic retreat" phase, scientists say, and is disgorging giant icebergs that could endanger shipping in the Gulf of Alaska, including tankers traveling to and from the oil port of Valdez. The largest of the icebergs, some as long as five football fields, currently are trapped inside a lake at the foot of the Bering Glacier and only smaller bergs are able to travel down a shallow outlet to enter the gulf.
NEWS
April 24, 1989 | From Times wire services
A Soviet oil-skimming ship sent with great fanfare to help contain the Alaskan oil spill has been beaten back by stormy seas and slowed by its own technical shortcomings, the U.S. Coast Guard said today. "To date, it's (the Soviet ship) not been very successful," Coast Guard Capt. Glen Haines told a public meeting on Exxon Corp.'s progress in handling the worst oil spill in U.S. history. He said the 435-foot Vaydagubski, the world's largest oil-skimming vessel, has been forced to enter the coastal port at Surprise Bay because of gale-force winds and rough seas that brought to a near halt oil spill operations in open waters over the weekend.
NEWS
March 31, 1989 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
Oil and gasoline prices jumped higher and supplies tightened on the West Coast on Thursday as Atlantic Richfield, Exxon and British Petroleum all announced refinery cutbacks and said they were unable to ship enough crude from Alaska to meet the needs of their customers. The sudden interruption of Alaskan crude oil shipments in the wake of last week's big oil spill drove some wholesale prices up by the hour.
TRAVEL
August 23, 1987 | SHIRLEY SLATER and HARRY BASCH, Slater and Basch are Los Angeles free-lance writers
If the energetic folks of British Columbia have their way, what people call the Alaska cruise may soon become the Canada and Alaska cruise. For starters, there is Canada Place, the magnificent harbor-front pavilion built for Expo '86 that is now serving as Vancouver's strikingly handsome cruise ship port.
NEWS
September 24, 1986 | United Press International
A Soviet spy ship retrieved a bag of garbage dumped by the U.S. aircraft carrier Constellation, apparently to probe for secrets, but got only "food, Coke cans and the garbage of 5,000 men," the Navy said Tuesday. "We were in typical fashion getting rid of our garbage," senior intelligence officer Joe Mazzafro said in an interview aboard ship. Garbage is put in plastic bags, punched through with holes to make it sink, and discarded, he said.
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