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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1995 | SUSAN WOODWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
American President Lines has had a long and proud presence in international trade, hauling cargo across the oceans as the United States' second-largest shipping company. But in a move some call unpatriotic, APL is heading for the Marshall Islands. Six new container ships to be added to the APL fleet by December will be registered in the islands under a waiver granted by the Maritime Administration in Washington.
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BUSINESS
April 7, 2008 | Susan Gallagher, The Associated Press
The nation's top hauler of container rail freight, BNSF Railway Co., is parking miles of rail cars in Montana and elsewhere because there isn't enough freight to keep them rolling. Cars that often carry 40-foot containers of goods shipped from Asia stand like an iron fence between the Missouri River and this Montana burg known for world-class fly fishing. They stretch as far as Sandee Cardinal can see when she stands outside her home on the river's west bank between Helena and Great Falls.
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NEWS
March 22, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The strongest evidence of damage from the Asian economic crisis emerged last week in the form of a record U.S. trade deficit, but the shipping world didn't need to be told: It has been turned on its head by Asia's woes. Much as U-Haul trailers from Los Angeles stacked up in Seattle during the early 1990s flight from California, thousands of empty shipping containers are piling up at Long Beach, Los Angeles and other West Coast ports because of plummeting Asian demand for U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2007 | Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writer
The overnight delivery packages that arrived with regularity from Asia at the Spanish-style home in suburban Diamond Bar were labeled "toys" and "action figures." But inside, authorities said, crawled rare, endangered tortoises illegally plucked from native habitats across Asia, including India.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Yellow Freight to Open Asia Routes: Yellow Freight Systems next month will begin shipping service to and from Hong Kong, Thailand and Singapore, its parent company has announced. Yellow Corp., a trucking firm based in Overland Park, Kan., said its subsidiary will focus on shipments between 500 pounds and 10 tons, and that services will include pickup, freight-forwarding, customs clearance and 24-hour trucking and tracing.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1991
* The Japan Seaman's Union voted to allow Japan-flagged vessels to call at ports in Qatar, reversing its earlier decision to bar its members from moving into the western half of the Persian Gulf. * Iberia SA, Spain's national carrier, said it would reduce flights between New York and Madrid because fears of terrorist attacks had lowered passenger demand. Earlier this week, the airline reduced flights to seven European cities and to five cities in Spain.
NEWS
March 10, 1999 | From Associated Press
The last 12 crew members stranded aboard a rusting cargo ship came ashore Tuesday, ending a 10-month ordeal during which they caught rainwater and fish to survive. "I'm very thankful to God," Capt. Maqsood Ahmed said. "We were prisoners at sea without committing a crime."
NEWS
December 23, 1998 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wreckage of the Asian economy is washing up on American shores. Two days before Thanksgiving, the Pakistani freighter Delta Pride limped into Brownsville, Texas, abandoned by its bankrupt owners, its 22-member crew beset by lice and scabies and subsisting on rainwater and whatever small fish could be caught from the deck. The people of Brownsville, in the spirit of the holidays, have rallied around the crewmen with donations of food, fuel and clothing.
NEWS
June 7, 1994 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Burlington Northern train from Chicago rumbles to a stop on Seattle's waterfront and unloads grain headed for Asia. Nearby, Nissans roll onto the dock from a notch in a massive steel box of a ship. A Chinese vessel weighed down by thousands of steel boxes filled with everything from toys to electronics moves toward a row of orange steel cranes perched along the waterfront like birds at a pond.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
The Federal Maritime Commission began a formal investigation Monday into whether shipping lines are unlawfully limiting vessel space for smaller shippers' cargo eastbound across the Pacific Ocean. The probe comes in response to complaints from shippers, particularly common carriers or consolidators that don't operate their own vessels. They say ship lines are denying them space on U.S.-bound ships in the transpacific market unless they agree to pay "significantly increased rates."
NEWS
August 29, 2001 | From Associated Press
Elite military personnel boarded a Norwegian cargo ship carrying 438 refugees today after its captain defied orders banning it from entering Australian waters, Prime Minister John Howard said. The Special Air Services troops were ferried on three boats to the ship, which rescued the refugees from a sinking Indonesian ferry., harbor master Don O'Donnell said. The ferrying boats returned to Christmas Island after dropping off the troops. No refugees were transferred back to the island, he said.
NEWS
March 25, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese warships firing warning shots and military aircraft dropping explosives chased two suspected spy ships in the Sea of Japan for more than 24 hours but gave up Wednesday when the vessels sped into North Korean territorial waters, the government said.
NEWS
March 10, 1999 | From Associated Press
The last 12 crew members stranded aboard a rusting cargo ship came ashore Tuesday, ending a 10-month ordeal during which they caught rainwater and fish to survive. "I'm very thankful to God," Capt. Maqsood Ahmed said. "We were prisoners at sea without committing a crime."
NEWS
December 23, 1998 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wreckage of the Asian economy is washing up on American shores. Two days before Thanksgiving, the Pakistani freighter Delta Pride limped into Brownsville, Texas, abandoned by its bankrupt owners, its 22-member crew beset by lice and scabies and subsisting on rainwater and whatever small fish could be caught from the deck. The people of Brownsville, in the spirit of the holidays, have rallied around the crewmen with donations of food, fuel and clothing.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
The Federal Maritime Commission began a formal investigation Monday into whether shipping lines are unlawfully limiting vessel space for smaller shippers' cargo eastbound across the Pacific Ocean. The probe comes in response to complaints from shippers, particularly common carriers or consolidators that don't operate their own vessels. They say ship lines are denying them space on U.S.-bound ships in the transpacific market unless they agree to pay "significantly increased rates."
NEWS
March 22, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The strongest evidence of damage from the Asian economic crisis emerged last week in the form of a record U.S. trade deficit, but the shipping world didn't need to be told: It has been turned on its head by Asia's woes. Much as U-Haul trailers from Los Angeles stacked up in Seattle during the early 1990s flight from California, thousands of empty shipping containers are piling up at Long Beach, Los Angeles and other West Coast ports because of plummeting Asian demand for U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2007 | Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writer
The overnight delivery packages that arrived with regularity from Asia at the Spanish-style home in suburban Diamond Bar were labeled "toys" and "action figures." But inside, authorities said, crawled rare, endangered tortoises illegally plucked from native habitats across Asia, including India.
NEWS
March 25, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese warships firing warning shots and military aircraft dropping explosives chased two suspected spy ships in the Sea of Japan for more than 24 hours but gave up Wednesday when the vessels sped into North Korean territorial waters, the government said.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Yellow Freight to Open Asia Routes: Yellow Freight Systems next month will begin shipping service to and from Hong Kong, Thailand and Singapore, its parent company has announced. Yellow Corp., a trucking firm based in Overland Park, Kan., said its subsidiary will focus on shipments between 500 pounds and 10 tons, and that services will include pickup, freight-forwarding, customs clearance and 24-hour trucking and tracing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1995 | SUSAN WOODWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
American President Lines has had a long and proud presence in international trade, hauling cargo across the oceans as the United States' second-largest shipping company. But in a move some call unpatriotic, APL is heading for the Marshall Islands. Six new container ships to be added to the APL fleet by December will be registered in the islands under a waiver granted by the Maritime Administration in Washington.
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