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BUSINESS
January 15, 2001 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two of the region's largest ocean-shipping lines plan to relocate most of their local administrative operations out of state within the next several weeks in what industry observers say is a move to cut costs and consolidate clerical functions and an attempt to elude a powerful labor union working to organize office employees at both companies. The relocations are expected to affect scores of clerical and administrative workers at Hanjin Shipping Co.'
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BUSINESS
January 15, 2001 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two of the region's largest ocean-shipping lines plan to relocate most of their local administrative operations out of state within the next several weeks in what industry observers say is a move to cut costs and consolidate clerical functions and an attempt to elude a powerful labor union working to organize office employees at both companies. The relocations are expected to affect scores of clerical and administrative workers at Hanjin Shipping Co.'
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated by more than 135 illegal union actions that have repeatedly idled West Coast ports since 1996, a powerful organization of shipping companies is seeking a court order to prevent dock workers from violating contract provisions designed to prohibit strikes and work slowdowns. The Pacific Maritime Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated by more than 135 illegal union actions that have repeatedly idled West Coast ports since 1996, a powerful organization of shipping companies is seeking a court order to prevent dock workers from violating contract provisions designed to prohibit strikes and work slowdowns. The Pacific Maritime Assn.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH and JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
New federal air pollution rules could remake the face of West Coast shipping, industry officials said Wednesday, driving commerce away from California just as international trade is becoming recognized as a core industry for the region in the coming century. Backers of the rules--unveiled this week by the U.S.
NEWS
June 27, 1988
An environmental group has withdrawn a lawsuit challenging the Port of Oakland's plan to deepen its shipping lanes, but another lawsuit to halt the dredging project remains. In withdrawing its suit, the Citizens for a Better Environment said the port has proceeded "in good faith" with its plans for deepening the harbor to accommodate huge container ships.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Interior Secretary Manuel J. Lujan Jr. said Wednesday that he was unaware that his department had asked the Coast Guard to trim tanker-traffic safety lanes off the California coast to accommodate more offshore drilling platforms, but he promised to look into the situation. His promise, however, was not enough to appease environmentalists and Rep. Barbara Boxer (D-Greenbrae), who vigorously opposes the 60% smaller sea lanes because they would, Boxer asserted, "set up the perfect circumstances for a devastating crash."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON and JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Contending that continued rail service problems on the massive Union Pacific system threaten California's economy, state officials today plan to urge the federal Surface Transportation Board to impose sanctions on the railroad and to open its lines to competitors if the crisis is not resolved soon. On Tuesday, the National Transportation Safety Board announced plans to hold hearings on the safety record of the nation's largest railroad.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1989 | PATRICK LEE, Times Staff Writer
A consortium of oil companies led by Chevron U.S.A. sued the California Coastal Commission for permission to transport oil by tanker from Chevron's operations at Point Arguello to its refinery in El Segundo, the company said Monday. The suit is the latest action by the company in its decade-long effort to produce oil from a 300-million-barrel field off Santa Barbara County, a project that the company estimated has cost the consortium about $2 billion without producing a drop of crude.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first, Terry Spragg wanted to tow icebergs. But technical problems prompted the Manhattan Beach real estate broker to regroup. What he really wanted, he decided, was to bring fresh water--not ice--to Southern California in his bid to cash in on the arid region's thirst.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON and JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Contending that continued rail service problems on the massive Union Pacific system threaten California's economy, state officials today plan to urge the federal Surface Transportation Board to impose sanctions on the railroad and to open its lines to competitors if the crisis is not resolved soon. On Tuesday, the National Transportation Safety Board announced plans to hold hearings on the safety record of the nation's largest railroad.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first, Terry Spragg wanted to tow icebergs. But technical problems prompted the Manhattan Beach real estate broker to regroup. What he really wanted, he decided, was to bring fresh water--not ice--to Southern California in his bid to cash in on the arid region's thirst.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH and JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
New federal air pollution rules could remake the face of West Coast shipping, industry officials said Wednesday, driving commerce away from California just as international trade is becoming recognized as a core industry for the region in the coming century. Backers of the rules--unveiled this week by the U.S.
NEWS
December 11, 1991 | Associated Press
The Cincinnati Zoo on Tuesday shipped 10-year-old Ndume, a 250-pound gorilla that is native to central and western Africa, to California in hopes that he can father other Western lowland gorillas. He is to be paired with Koko, a 20-year-old female at the Gorilla Foundation in Woodside, Calif., for breeding.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1989 | PATRICK LEE, Times Staff Writer
A consortium of oil companies led by Chevron U.S.A. sued the California Coastal Commission for permission to transport oil by tanker from Chevron's operations at Point Arguello to its refinery in El Segundo, the company said Monday. The suit is the latest action by the company in its decade-long effort to produce oil from a 300-million-barrel field off Santa Barbara County, a project that the company estimated has cost the consortium about $2 billion without producing a drop of crude.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Interior Secretary Manuel J. Lujan Jr. said Wednesday that he was unaware that his department had asked the Coast Guard to trim tanker-traffic safety lanes off the California coast to accommodate more offshore drilling platforms, but he promised to look into the situation. His promise, however, was not enough to appease environmentalists and Rep. Barbara Boxer (D-Greenbrae), who vigorously opposes the 60% smaller sea lanes because they would, Boxer asserted, "set up the perfect circumstances for a devastating crash."
NEWS
December 11, 1991 | Associated Press
The Cincinnati Zoo on Tuesday shipped 10-year-old Ndume, a 250-pound gorilla that is native to central and western Africa, to California in hopes that he can father other Western lowland gorillas. He is to be paired with Koko, a 20-year-old female at the Gorilla Foundation in Woodside, Calif., for breeding.
NEWS
July 18, 1988
A state appeals court has refused to allow the Port of Oakland to resume dumping sludge from a harbor-dredging project into fishing waters off Half Moon Bay without first gaining approval from the state Coastal Commission. The decision by the 1st District Court of Appeal in San Francisco is another setback in the port's plans to deepen Oakland's inner harbor to accommodate a fleet of super container ships.
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