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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1996
Los Angeles port officials said Wednesday that they are optimistic about their prospects in competing against the adjacent Port of Long Beach for the business of a Chinese shipping firm that has plans to open its first U.S. cargo terminal next year. The company, Chinese Ocean Shipping Co., now ships through the Long Beach port, which plans to raze the closed Long Beach Naval Station property to build a 130-acre terminal.
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BUSINESS
April 30, 2002 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Northrop Grumman Corp. won a $2.9-billion contract Monday to begin designing a new generation of destroyers, beating out archrival General Dynamics Co. for what Pentagon officials described as one of the most significant Navy programs in decades. By winning the contract, Century City-based Northrop and its partner, Raytheon Corp.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1997
Long Beach port commissioners on Monday officially withdrew their approval of a planned cargo terminal project on the site of the city's closed Naval Station. The unanimous vote by the harbor panel comes in response to a court ruling that the port rushed approval of the 145-acre terminal without adequate public input. To comply with instructions from Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Robert H. O'Brien, the port has scheduled a new public hearing on the project, to be held Wednesday evening.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2001 | Bloomberg News
FedEx Corp. said Monday that its fiscal second-quarter profit will exceed forecasts because a U.S. Postal Service contract will boost the largest overnight-delivery company's freight sales and the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks have had a smaller than expected effect on business. Excluding $101 million in aid from the U.S. government after the attacks, FedEx said it expects profit of 40 cents to 45 cents in the quarter ending Nov. 30. On that basis, FedEx was expected to earn 35 cents.
BUSINESS
August 14, 1990 | From Reuters
United Parcel Service workers have ratified a new three-year contract despite a call by their union leaders to reject the pact, averting the possibility of a strike that could have snarled the nation's package shipping system. Results announced Monday showed that 55% of the Teamsters Union members who voted approved the pact, which will raise average hourly wages to $17.60 in the third year of the contract from the current $16.10.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1992 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sandra L. Cook knew her wheezy, 13-year-old Datsun would never make the long trip from Florida to her retirement home in Upstate New York. So for $625, she hired an auto mover to take it. Instead, she said, the auto mover took her for a ride. Cook canceled her contract with AAA Discount Auto Shippers after 32 days because the company could not say when it would deliver the car. She asked for a full refund, but was told to forget it.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1993 | Chris Woodyard / Times staff writer
Dream Client: Like most companies, Burlington Air Express is trying to become the Rolls-Royce of its industry. And in the meantime, it has won a contract to ship jet aircraft engine parts to Rolls-Royce in Derby, England. Irvine-based Burlington will fly parts from American suppliers to Rolls-Royce, including entire aircraft engines. The deal is valued at $2 million a year. Burlington Chairman David L. Marshall called Rolls-Royce "a wonderful addition to our customer base."
BUSINESS
December 18, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Pentagon awarded a $641-million contract to a group led by Avondale Industries Inc. to begin building a new class of amphibious ships. The group defeated a rival team led by Ingalls Shipbuilding, a unit of Woodland Hills-based Litton Industries Inc. The Navy eventually wants 12 of the new vessels--which are designed to ferry troops ashore in amphibious assault missions--for a purchase price exceeding $9 billion. The Avondale team includes Los Angeles-based Hughes Electronics Corp.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1993 | From Associated Press
Newport News Shipbuilding is challenging the Navy's decision to award two competitors contracts to build 12 cargo ships worth $2.6 billion, a yard spokesman said Tuesday. The shipyard filed a formal protest of the Navy's choices with the General Accounting Office on Friday, only two days after the second of the contracts was awarded to a San Diego shipyard, yard spokesman Jack Garrow said. The winning bidders, National Steel & Shipbuilding Co.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1996 | From Washington Post
Litton Industries filed a formal protest Thursday against the Navy's recent award of a contract to two competitors for a new model of a Marine Corps amphibious ship. Litton said its own bid for the first three LPD San Antonio-class amphibious transport ships was about $100 million less than the winning bid by the team of New Orleans-based Avondale Industries and General Dynamics of Falls Church, Va. While the initial contract awarded on Dec. 17 was for building three LPD ships for about $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1997
Long Beach port commissioners on Monday officially withdrew their approval of a planned cargo terminal project on the site of the city's closed Naval Station. The unanimous vote by the harbor panel comes in response to a court ruling that the port rushed approval of the 145-acre terminal without adequate public input. To comply with instructions from Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Robert H. O'Brien, the port has scheduled a new public hearing on the project, to be held Wednesday evening.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1996 | From Washington Post
Litton Industries filed a formal protest Thursday against the Navy's recent award of a contract to two competitors for a new model of a Marine Corps amphibious ship. Litton said its own bid for the first three LPD San Antonio-class amphibious transport ships was about $100 million less than the winning bid by the team of New Orleans-based Avondale Industries and General Dynamics of Falls Church, Va. While the initial contract awarded on Dec. 17 was for building three LPD ships for about $1.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Pentagon awarded a $641-million contract to a group led by Avondale Industries Inc. to begin building a new class of amphibious ships. The group defeated a rival team led by Ingalls Shipbuilding, a unit of Woodland Hills-based Litton Industries Inc. The Navy eventually wants 12 of the new vessels--which are designed to ferry troops ashore in amphibious assault missions--for a purchase price exceeding $9 billion. The Avondale team includes Los Angeles-based Hughes Electronics Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1996
Los Angeles port officials said Wednesday that they are optimistic about their prospects in competing against the adjacent Port of Long Beach for the business of a Chinese shipping firm that has plans to open its first U.S. cargo terminal next year. The company, Chinese Ocean Shipping Co., now ships through the Long Beach port, which plans to raze the closed Long Beach Naval Station property to build a 130-acre terminal.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1993 | Chris Woodyard / Times staff writer
Dream Client: Like most companies, Burlington Air Express is trying to become the Rolls-Royce of its industry. And in the meantime, it has won a contract to ship jet aircraft engine parts to Rolls-Royce in Derby, England. Irvine-based Burlington will fly parts from American suppliers to Rolls-Royce, including entire aircraft engines. The deal is valued at $2 million a year. Burlington Chairman David L. Marshall called Rolls-Royce "a wonderful addition to our customer base."
BUSINESS
September 22, 1993 | From Associated Press
Newport News Shipbuilding is challenging the Navy's decision to award two competitors contracts to build 12 cargo ships worth $2.6 billion, a yard spokesman said Tuesday. The shipyard filed a formal protest of the Navy's choices with the General Accounting Office on Friday, only two days after the second of the contracts was awarded to a San Diego shipyard, yard spokesman Jack Garrow said. The winning bidders, National Steel & Shipbuilding Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1986 | ARMANDO ACUNA, Times Staff Writer
In the highly competitive world of shipbuilding, a little edge can go a long way--to contracts worth hundreds of millions and even billions of dollars. That is why National Steel and Shipbuilding Co., the largest shipbuilder on the West Coast and one of the city's largest employers, is hopeful that a proposed privately owned power plant will help give it the competitive edge on a Navy contract worth $2.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1991 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miami-based Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. on Tuesday terminated Southwest Marine's $75-million, still uncompleted contract to refurbish the Viking Serenade, one of largest cruise ships to make regular calls at Southern California ports. The contract termination was prompted by "disagreements on times included in the contract," according to Royal Caribbean spokesman Lloyd Axelrod. Southwest President Arthur Engle did not return telephone calls Tuesday.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1993 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Navy on Wednesday gave San Diego's economy a much-needed shot in the arm by awarding National Steel & Shipbuilding Co. a $1.3-billion contract to build as many as six gigantic supply ships. The contract is a major plum for Nassco, as the shipyard is known. It is the West Coast's last major shipbuilder, and management had been worried that it might have to order numerous layoffs once current contracts were filled in 1996.
NEWS
April 2, 1993 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Navy, acting at the eleventh-hour of the George Bush Administration, awarded a $365-million contract for a supply ship in an effort to preclude President Clinton from blocking or delaying the controversial and troubled program. Just two business days before Bush left office, the Navy awarded the contract to the National Steel & Shipbuilding Co. (NASSCO) in San Diego to build the AOE-10, the fourth and last in a series.
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