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Shipping East Asia

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BUSINESS
July 21, 1994 | From Reuters
"Phantom ships," using fake documentation, are hijacking cargoes from ports across East Asia in the latest twist on piracy in the region, maritime officials said Wednesday. "It is a problem which has accelerated," said Eric Ellen, executive director of the Commercial Crime Services Division of the Britain-based International Chamber of Commerce. At least $200 million worth of cargo is being hijacked every year by these phantom ships, Ellen told reporters after a two-day conference on piracy.
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BUSINESS
July 21, 1994 | From Reuters
"Phantom ships," using fake documentation, are hijacking cargoes from ports across East Asia in the latest twist on piracy in the region, maritime officials said Wednesday. "It is a problem which has accelerated," said Eric Ellen, executive director of the Commercial Crime Services Division of the Britain-based International Chamber of Commerce. At least $200 million worth of cargo is being hijacked every year by these phantom ships, Ellen told reporters after a two-day conference on piracy.
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BUSINESS
September 30, 2006 | Hector Tobar and Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writers
Seeking to cash in on booming Asian exports, Nicaragua will announce a $20-billion proposal next week to build a canal linking the Pacific and the Atlantic oceans that would accommodate ships too large to use the Panama Canal, Nicaraguan officials said Friday. If approved by Nicaragua's Congress, the project would be a joint public-private venture financed by unnamed investors, said Lindolfo Monjarretz, a spokesman for Nicaraguan President Enrique Bolanos.
OPINION
September 13, 1998 | JONATHAN KIRSHNER, Jonathan Kirshner, author of "Currency and Coercion: The Political Economy of International Monetary Power" (Princeton University Press, 1995), is a professor in the government department at Cornell University
The world's great financial powers and institutions continue to scramble in an effort to contain the Asian financial crisis. But the one-size-fits-all austerity packages that the International Monetary Fund is shipping to East Asia target the domestic symptoms, not the international causes, of the crisis there. They will not solve the underlying economic problem.
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