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BUSINESS
September 3, 1990 | From Associated Press
Shipping industry stocks have tumbled on fears that the embargo on Iraqi and Kuwaiti oil will leave tankers idle as insurance companies impose war-zone premiums and sailors demand hazardous-duty pay. Stock market shipping indexes have slumped 25% worldwide since Iraq invaded Kuwait on Aug. 2, said Lloyd's List International in London. It said Norwegian and U.S. shipping companies have been hit hardest.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
The Somali pirates in the documentary "Stolen Seas" brandish bazookas instead of swords and have roughly the same sense of chivalry as the husbands on "The Real Housewives of New Jersey. " "There's no such thing as a romantic Somali pirate," says one of the movie's many talking heads. You probably suspected as much. Still, Thymaya Payne's ambitious doc contains plenty of surprising and interesting details about the Somali pirate trade, which, according to the film, costs the shipping industry $7 billion to $12 billion annually.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
The Somali pirates in the documentary "Stolen Seas" brandish bazookas instead of swords and have roughly the same sense of chivalry as the husbands on "The Real Housewives of New Jersey. " "There's no such thing as a romantic Somali pirate," says one of the movie's many talking heads. You probably suspected as much. Still, Thymaya Payne's ambitious doc contains plenty of surprising and interesting details about the Somali pirate trade, which, according to the film, costs the shipping industry $7 billion to $12 billion annually.
TRAVEL
January 19, 2012 | By Beverly Beyette, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's a cruise vacation, promising lots of fine dining and drinking, new adventures and relaxation. What could go wrong? As the 4,200 people aboard the cruise ship Costa Concordia found, just about everything. The Jan. 13 capsizing of the Concordia off the coast of Italy, in which at least 11 people died, caught the world - including the cruise ship industry and its passengers - off guard and is shining a spotlight on cruise ship safety concerns. Is it possible for today's megaships - some hold as many as 6,000 passengers - to deal effectively with emergencies?
BUSINESS
May 2, 1992 | From Associated Press
Transportation Secretary Andrew F. Card on Friday proposed 300 changes in regulations that he said would contribute billions of dollars to the economy without compromising safety. Card's proposals, based on a 90-day review of department rules, coincides with President Bush's decision this week to extend for four months a moratorium on new government regulations. Bush said the freeze would save U.S. consumers at least $15 billion a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Casual longshore workers are the grunts of the local waterfront. They lack union status and keep odd, inconsistent hours moving cargo vital to the economy of the western United States. A week or 10 days can pass before they get a chance to earn a full day's pay. Their hiring hall isn't a hall at all, but a parking lot next to an auto dismantling yard in Wilmington. Dead bodies are sometimes found nearby, and bullet holes dot the dispatcher's small office.
NEWS
March 7, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the fear of oil spills, coastal states generally may not set extra safety rules for huge oil tankers operating in their waters, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday. The 9-0 ruling upholds the principle of "national uniformity regarding maritime commerce," so that ships can move from port to port, both here and abroad, under one set of rules. Congress and the Coast Guard are responsible for setting safety standards, the court said.
NEWS
June 15, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the Susan Maersk, size matters. The Danish-built container ship is more than 3 1/2 football fields long and wider than the Panama Canal. Descending five levels into the hull is one of the largest marine diesels on Earth, a massive 12-cylinder engine that produces 75,000 horsepower. Twelve stories above the waterline is a fully automated bridge. It overlooks a plain of steel deck and a series of cavernous holds that can carry 6,600 20-foot-long cargo containers.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1993 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You might say Joe Bennett lives on deadline. Every afternoon, the United Parcel Service driver has to beat the clock as he pilots a bulky chocolate-brown van from the company's hilltop processing center in Aliso Viejo to the Long Beach Airport. It's the last chance for packages from Orange County to make an overnight delivery jet. Traffic jams resulting from accidents, rain or sold-out concerts at the Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre can make Bennett horribly late.
NEWS
January 17, 2001 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Air pollution from giant commercial ships plying the nation's coastlines will be targeted for control for the first time under an agreement the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Tuesday. Under the agreement, which settled a lawsuit filed by environmentalists, the EPA will begin developing rules to cut smog-forming exhaust from the largest, diesel-powered ships, including cargo vessels, tankers and cruise liners.
BUSINESS
November 25, 2010 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
After an unwelcome reprieve caused by the global recession, employers in international trade again are growing concerned about whether there will be enough qualified candidates to fill the next generation of cargo and logistics jobs. A spate of reports over the last two years has conjured up images of ships with too few seafarers to operate them, truck-ready freight with too few drivers to do the hauling and warehouse and distribution centers without enough qualified administrators to run them.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2009 | Ronald D. White
Trade at international ports is on track to drop more than 10% this year, one of the steepest declines ever, according to a new maritime industry report. Cargo ships will carry 27 million fewer containers by year's end than they did in 2008 -- a reduction roughly equivalent to all of the cargo containers handled by the five busiest U.S. seaports in a typical year, according to London-based Drewry Shipping Consultants' Container Forecaster Report. "There has never been a decline like this before.
BUSINESS
July 7, 2009 | Kimi Yoshino
The nation's cruise ship industry, in a turnaround from its long-standing position that no additional government oversight is needed, endorsed proposed federal safety legislation Monday, paving the way for increased security measures on cruise ships. Cruise Lines International Assn., the industry's chief lobbying and advocacy organization representing 24 member cruise lines, sent a letter of support to Sen. John F. Kerry (D-Mass.), one of the bill's sponsors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2008 | Margot Roosevelt, Times Staff Writer
California regulators adopted the world's toughest pollution rules for oceangoing vessels Thursday, vowing to improve the health of coastal residents and opening a new front in a long battle with the international shipping industry. The rules, which take effect in 2009, would require ships within 24 nautical miles of California to burn low-sulfur diesel instead of the tar-like sludge known as bunker fuel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2007 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
Joined by a chorus of California and local officials, U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer accused federal air regulators Thursday of stalling on rules for highly polluting ocean vessels and said Congress must act instead.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2006 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
Crammed inside a big metal box, Charlie Woo's toys make their way from Asia to his downtown Los Angeles warehouse. Lately, the trip has become less expensive for containers of miniature tea sets, remote-control cars and super-size squirt guns. Woo, owner of Megatoys, says that shipping rates have dropped and that he is saving $50 to $100 for each cargo container he fills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1996
Pressed into action after weeks of labor demonstrations at the Los Angeles Port, the City Council on Friday asked the Harbor Commission to investigate claims by hundreds of truck drivers that steamship lines and other companies involved with the port routinely break federal tax and customs laws. More than 4,000 truckers refused in early May to work for harbor area trucking companies, which haul cargo containers to and from the port for various clients.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S., Japan Open Talks to Avert Aviation Sanctions: The negotiations will focus on Japan's refusal to allow expanded cargo flights by Federal Express Corp. U. S. Transportation Secretary Federico Pena has threatened sanctions on Japanese cargo flights to the United States if the proposed services are denied to FedEx. He said the restrictions will be imposed in mid-July.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2001 | CARRI KARUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's 5:45 a.m. as Capt. David Brusco maneuvers his tugboat through the fog toward a cargo ship waiting about two miles outside the Port of Hueneme. It's a good time of day to tow a ship into harbor. The winds haven't picked up yet, and the sea is calm. But the life of a tugboat operator can be anything but calm. The tugboat captains and deckhands at the port often battle high winds and towering waves to bring in the massive ships that make this harbor tick.
NEWS
January 17, 2001 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Air pollution from giant commercial ships plying the nation's coastlines will be targeted for control for the first time under an agreement the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Tuesday. Under the agreement, which settled a lawsuit filed by environmentalists, the EPA will begin developing rules to cut smog-forming exhaust from the largest, diesel-powered ships, including cargo vessels, tankers and cruise liners.
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