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NEWS
May 29, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
En route from Long Beach to Asia with a load of clothing, electronics and seafood, the Sea-Land Endurance sails in an ocean of uncertainty. The 845-foot container ship is registered in the United States and has a crew of Americans--an increasing rarity in a global business dominated by foreign-owned vessels that are cheaper to operate. At the end of 1946, 2,332 American cargo ships carried roughly 45% of all imports and exports involving the United States. By 1990, 360 vessels were in service.
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NEWS
May 29, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
En route from Long Beach to Asia with a load of clothing, electronics and seafood, the Sea-Land Endurance sails in an ocean of uncertainty. The 845-foot container ship is registered in the United States and has a crew of Americans--an increasing rarity in a global business dominated by foreign-owned vessels that are cheaper to operate. At the end of 1946, 2,332 American cargo ships carried roughly 45% of all imports and exports involving the United States. By 1990, 360 vessels were in service.
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BUSINESS
November 1, 1997 | From Associated Press
Federal regulators Friday issued an emergency order requiring troubled Union Pacific Railroad to open a section of track to a Texas competitor in a bid to ease the gridlock that has harmed shippers across the Western United States. The Surface Transportation Board, which just days ago held a marathon hearing on the problems at the nation's largest railroad, said Friday that there is a "transportation emergency in the West."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an attempt to reduce the environmental havoc caused by the inadvertent introduction of foreign species, federal authorities today will begin regulating the discharge of ballast water from cargo ships entering all ports in the United States. The plan, which will be administered by the U.S. Coast Guard, asks vessels traveling international routes to exchange their ballast at least 200 miles from their U.S. destinations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an attempt to reduce the environmental havoc caused by the inadvertent introduction of foreign species, federal authorities today will begin regulating the discharge of ballast water from cargo ships entering all ports in the United States. The plan, which will be administered by the U.S. Coast Guard, asks vessels traveling international routes to exchange their ballast at least 200 miles from their U.S. destinations.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1997 | Associated Press
Union Pacific's regional vice president, Robert Starzel, said that small mistakes led to the massive logjam that clogged West Coast ports and left Midwestern grain sitting on the ground, but that the company is digging its way out of the mess. At a hearing of the state Public Utilities Commission in Long Beach, Starzel said the congestion is beginning to clear, although operations probably won't return to normal until late December or early January.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1997 | Associated Press
Union Pacific's regional vice president, Robert Starzel, said that small mistakes led to the massive logjam that clogged West Coast ports and left Midwestern grain sitting on the ground, but that the company is digging its way out of the mess. At a hearing of the state Public Utilities Commission in Long Beach, Starzel said the congestion is beginning to clear, although operations probably won't return to normal until late December or early January.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1997 | From Associated Press
Federal regulators Friday issued an emergency order requiring troubled Union Pacific Railroad to open a section of track to a Texas competitor in a bid to ease the gridlock that has harmed shippers across the Western United States. The Surface Transportation Board, which just days ago held a marathon hearing on the problems at the nation's largest railroad, said Friday that there is a "transportation emergency in the West."
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