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NEWS
October 7, 1990 | Reuters
A 24-hour strike by Australian dock workers left the country's major ports idle Friday, a shipping industry official said. The strike by an estimated 10,000 waterfront workers, which started at midnight Thursday, would cost shipping companies about $1 million, the official said. About 60 ships in 11 ports were affected by the stoppage, said Assn. of Employers of Waterside Labor official Gerry Johnstone. Passenger vessels, perishable cargoes and livestock were exempted from the dispute.
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NEWS
August 17, 1987 | From Reuters
Todd Shipyards Corp., the nation's biggest independent shipbuilder, today filed for protection from its creditors under Chapter 11 of the federal bankruptcy code. Todd said the bankruptcy petition also applied to its subsidiary, Todd Pacific Shipyards, but not to its Aro Corp. unit, which manufactures air-powered tools and has not been affected by the troubles in the shipping industry.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1997
APL Ltd. said its $825-million acquisition by Singapore-based Neptune Orient Lines Ltd. has been completed, creating one of the world's largest shipping and container companies. APL will maintain its headquarters in Oakland and will become a Neptune subsidiary. The move comes amid a wave of consolidation in the shipping industry, as competition toughens and rates fall. Neptune Orient and APL said the combined company will have a broader reach and greater flexibility to cut costs.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The longshore union and shipping industry reached a tentative agreement on technology -- the stickiest issue in their prolonged labor dispute -- early Friday, after all-night talks with three federal mediators and a top AFL-CIO official. No details were released on the deal, which many saw as a breakthrough in the stalemate that has disrupted commercial trade along the West Coast for more than a month.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2002 | Nancy Cleeland
Longshore union officials denied they were violating court orders by orchestrating slowdowns at West Coast docks, and told the Justice Department that the blame for continuing backlogs of cargo lies with the shipping lines. "The fact is our workers are ready, willing and able to work," said James Spinosa, president of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, which has been in contract talks with the Pacific Maritime Assn., representing the shipping industry.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2000 | Stephen Gregory
The number of import containers at the Port of Los Angeles fell below 200,000 in November for the first time in eight months, marking the shipping industry's traditional end-of-the-year import slowdown. Most imported goods earmarked for the holiday shopping season arrived by the end of October, which set the port's single-month record for inbound cargo at 251,000 20-foot-long shipping containers. November's tally was a relatively quiet 199,400, port officials said.
NEWS
October 17, 1991
As expected, Gov. Pete Wilson has signed legislation authorizing a vessel tracking service for the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles, clearing the way for the country's first major ship-monitoring system in private hands. The tracking system will be operated by the Marine Exchange, a nonprofit agency controlled by the shipping industry, but will have to be certified by the Coast Guard and a state oil spill prevention administrator.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1991
As expected, Gov. Pete Wilson this week signed legislation authorizing a vessel-tracking service for the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, clearing the way for the country's first major ship-monitoring system in private hands. The tracking system will be operated by the Marine Exchange, a nonprofit agency controlled by the shipping industry, but will have to be certified by the Coast Guard and a state oil spill prevention administrator.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
The Great Lakes shipping industry suffered a second straight season of declining cargo in 1990, with an increase in iron ore shipments being offset by decreases in coal and stone shipments, it was reported today. The Lake Carriers' Assn. said 1990 shipments of the three major commodities totaled 133 million tons, down from 133.4 million tons in 1989 and 136.7 million tons in 1988. The season ended Feb. 1. Iron ore cargo, however, reached a 10-year high of 69 million tons, up from 66.
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