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Shipping Kuwait

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NEWS
March 13, 1991 | DAVID FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Swept clear of mines but still plainly ravaged by war, this major port reopened to international commerce early Tuesday, Kuwait's first open link to the sea since being overrun by Iraq seven months ago. Within hours, at least two merchant ships, one American and the other Soviet, began unloading their cargoes of potable water, 11 million gallons in all, for Kuwaitis whose water supply system was all but destroyed during the war. "So many things need to be done . . .
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NEWS
March 13, 1991 | DAVID FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Swept clear of mines but still plainly ravaged by war, this major port reopened to international commerce early Tuesday, Kuwait's first open link to the sea since being overrun by Iraq seven months ago. Within hours, at least two merchant ships, one American and the other Soviet, began unloading their cargoes of potable water, 11 million gallons in all, for Kuwaitis whose water supply system was all but destroyed during the war. "So many things need to be done . . .
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NEWS
September 8, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 700 Indians arrived here Friday on board the first ship to leave Kuwait since the Iraqi invasion. The exhausted refugees made the three-day voyage with little to eat except bread and tuna fish. "We had hot, oily water to drink," said a young man named Rajiv, an engineering student from New York who was visiting Kuwait when the Iraqis struck on Aug. 2. "But we are safe now." Sweat streamed down his face, and his eyes were bloodshot from the sun and lack of sleep.
NEWS
September 8, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 700 Indians arrived here Friday on board the first ship to leave Kuwait since the Iraqi invasion. The exhausted refugees made the three-day voyage with little to eat except bread and tuna fish. "We had hot, oily water to drink," said a young man named Rajiv, an engineering student from New York who was visiting Kuwait when the Iraqis struck on Aug. 2. "But we are safe now." Sweat streamed down his face, and his eyes were bloodshot from the sun and lack of sleep.
NEWS
May 25, 1987 | From Reuters
The ruler of Kuwait, who is seeking superpower protection for his country's vital oil exports, says the Persian Gulf War is spreading and that this is cause for international concern. "The war has extended even to the big powers," the emir, Sheik Jabbar al Ahmed al Sabah, said in an address Saturday night.
NEWS
July 19, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
The following is a chronology of events in the Iran-Iraq War: 1980--In response to statements by Iran's revolutionary regime suggesting that it intends to bring down the government in Baghdad, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein on Sept. 7 abrogates a 1975 treaty with Iran and claims full sovereignty over the Shatt al Arab waterway, which forms part of the border between the two countries. On Sept. 22, Iraqi bombers raid Tehran airport and Iraqi troops cross into Iran.
NEWS
April 3, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraq agreed today to pull 300 troops out of an off-limits zone along its border with Kuwait, ending an incursion that violated the tentative cease-fire in the Persian Gulf War. Heeding a warning from the U.S. military, Iraq said the troops will be back behind the demarcation truce line by tonight, according to a spokesman for the U.S. Central Command in Riyadh.
OPINION
August 2, 1987 | Michael M. Reisman, Michael Reisman is professor of international law at Yale Law School.
The United States is in the Persian Gulf now because Kuwait wants us there--and had us cornered. Are Kuwait's geopolitical objectives the same as ours? Kuwait is a city-state of a little more than 1.5 million people, 60% of whom are not Kuwaitis. It was established by the Sabah family, as a fort, in 1756 and has been owned and operated by them ever since. It is a monarchy, with a Sabah as king, a Sabah as prime minister, another as foreign minister, another as minister of defense.
NEWS
August 3, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Iran called Sunday for the overthrow of the government of Saudi Arabia in retaliation for the violence that left hundreds dead during the annual pilgrimage to Islam's holy shrines in Mecca. The call by the Speaker of Iran's Parliament, Hashemi Rafsanjani, represented a serious escalation of tensions in the Middle East, already high because of threats to Persian Gulf shipping.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Hashemi Rafsanjani, the Speaker of the Iranian Parliament, has threatened that Iran will attack U.S. shipping in the Persian Gulf and any Arab states in the region that provide assistance to U.S. military forces, the official news agency reported Wednesday.
NEWS
October 18, 1987 | MELISSA HEALY and NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan, leading top Administration officials in taking a tougher stand on the Persian Gulf, on Saturday called the U.S. role in the Middle East "that of peacemaker" but warned that any action against commercial ships flying the American flag in the region "will be dealt with appropriately."
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