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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1990 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shipping in Los Angeles Harbor returned to normal Saturday after the Coast Guard reopened the main channel, ending a 24-hour emergency caused by a toxic chemical leaking from a container in the hold of a big freighter.
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BUSINESS
September 18, 1998 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an indication that fallout from Asia's economic turmoil continues to jostle the U.S. and local economies, the nation's busiest ports at Long Beach and Los Angeles reported Thursday that overall export volume in August was down at least 4% over a year ago. At the Port of Long Beach, which handles more cargo than any other U.S. harbor, the drop was even more pronounced at 11.5%. And August also marked the port's fifth straight month of decline in export volume.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1990 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Port of Los Angeles was paralyzed Saturday by an unexpected strike of the tiny, 11-member union of pilots who steer huge oil tankers, freighters and passenger vessels through the narrow channels of the nation's second-busiest harbor. Although management personnel were available to navigate the eight ships that arrived Saturday, the walkout halted port operations because longshoremen, who load and unload the massive vessels, refused to cross the pilots' picket line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1998 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Richard Riordan climaxed his Asia mission Thursday to the sound of popping champagne corks, as he signed the first of an anticipated two deals expected to generate thousands of jobs and bring more than $1 billion to the growing Port of Los Angeles. The agreement signed Thursday ended three years of negotiations with Evergreen Marine Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1995 | SUSAN WOODWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
American President Lines has had a long and proud presence in international trade, hauling cargo across the oceans as the United States' second-largest shipping company. But in a move some call unpatriotic, APL is heading for the Marshall Islands. Six new container ships to be added to the APL fleet by December will be registered in the islands under a waiver granted by the Maritime Administration in Washington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1988 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writer
With its powerful diesel engines gently rumbling, Capt. Christi Thomas nudged the tugboat Spartan against the huge ship towering over her and shouted to the tug's deckhands to make fast to the Korean vessel. The Auto Champ--a 650-foot car carrier tied up in Los Angeles Harbor--had unloaded hundreds of Asian-built Chevrolets and Fords at Terminal Island and was ready to sail, but needed help getting under way.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Port of Los Angeles was back in business Sunday night, as port pilots reached agreement with the Los Angeles Harbor Department, ending a two-day strike that had crippled operations at the nation's second-busiest port. Both the pilots and the longshoremen--who walked off the job in sympathy with the tiny 11-member pilots union--went back to work as soon as the settlement was announced at 8 p.m. "We're pleased," said port spokeswoman Julia Nagano.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1988 | JAMES F. PELTZ, Times Staff Writer
Exports from the Los Angeles area, particularly to the Pacific Basin, are surging. So that means the number of trade-related jobs in Southern California should also be rising sharply, right? Not quite. At the Port of Los Angeles, for instance, "there's not really that much more employment" among the dozens of firms that use and service the port despite the jump in exports of U.S. goods, said Robert D. Kleist, corporate adviser to Evergreen International Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1989 | Research: Tracy Thomas / Los Angeles Times
Passenger and cargo totals for August. % Number of Passengers Change Tons of Cargo 1989 1988 1989 1988 L.A. Int'l Airport 4,787,063 4,606,621 +4 104,481 99,935** Burbank Airport 267,195 278,497 -4 1,159 1,177 Long Beach Airport 137,801 114,235 +21 146 281 Port of Los Angeles 45,213 34,541 +31 6,763,272 5,797,120 Rapid Transit Dist. 34,722,000 33,005,000 +5 none none Amtrak* 190,393 180,490 +5 none none (L.A./S. Diego) Amtrak* 46,070 44,349 +4 none none (L.A./San Fran.) % Change L.A.
NEWS
February 10, 1990
The Los Angeles Harbor pilots, whose job it is to steer huge cargo ships in and out of the Port of Los Angeles, have announced that they are going on strike early today over what they say are unsafe working conditions at the port. "The strike is in protest of unfair labor practices," said Wallace Knox, the lawyer representing the 14-member pilots' union. "The harbor is unilaterally imposing a wide range of emergency and poorly thought-out measures to deal with the pilot crunch."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON and JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Contending that continued rail service problems on the massive Union Pacific system threaten California's economy, state officials today plan to urge the federal Surface Transportation Board to impose sanctions on the railroad and to open its lines to competitors if the crisis is not resolved soon. On Tuesday, the National Transportation Safety Board announced plans to hold hearings on the safety record of the nation's largest railroad.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1997 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The Union Pacific Railroad is going far to prove that the private sector cannot be relied on to serve the public interest. The unprecedented delays and mounting losses for shippers through the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach due to the railroad's mismanagement in the aftermath of its 1996 merger with the Southern Pacific are disgraceful--and extremely costly. "This is the worst congestion we've ever had," says Don Wylie, director of trade for the Port of Long Beach.
NEWS
November 4, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Safety, service and capacity problems on the Union Pacific Railroad's troubled 36,000-mile system all but locked up vital sectors of Los Angeles' economy Monday, stranding cargo in the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, forcing shippers to reroute goods to other harbors and holding up chlorine needed to treat the region's water supply. The railroad's problems in moving freight also have been blamed for delaying Metrolink commuter train service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1995 | SUSAN WOODWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
American President Lines has had a long and proud presence in international trade, hauling cargo across the oceans as the United States' second-largest shipping company. But in a move some call unpatriotic, APL is heading for the Marshall Islands. Six new container ships to be added to the APL fleet by December will be registered in the islands under a waiver granted by the Maritime Administration in Washington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1995 | MARK RIDLEY-THOMAS and MARVIN BRAUDE, Mark Ridley-Thomas is the city councilman for District 8, which includes South Central and the Crenshaw area. Marvin Braude represents District 11 on the West Side and part of the San Fernando Valley. and
Government-as-usual is not enough; people want change. The public has expressed these sentiments in recent elections and opinion polls. People want government to effectively work on the problems they face: festering crime, budgetary and financial uncertainties and strained public services in a flat economy. A large part of our job as elected officials involves managing and overseeing Los Angeles' bureaucracy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1993 | GORDON DILLOW, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the 24 Russian sailors who have been stranded in Los Angeles Harbor for the past three months, the voyage to America has been one unlucky break after another. Their luck took another turn for the worse recently when a relief expedition sent from Russia reportedly made it only as far as Mexico City before turning around and heading home, leaving the hapless Russian sailors still stranded in the harbor aboard their ship, the Gigant.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1998 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an indication that fallout from Asia's economic turmoil continues to jostle the U.S. and local economies, the nation's busiest ports at Long Beach and Los Angeles reported Thursday that overall export volume in August was down at least 4% over a year ago. At the Port of Long Beach, which handles more cargo than any other U.S. harbor, the drop was even more pronounced at 11.5%. And August also marked the port's fifth straight month of decline in export volume.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON and JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Contending that continued rail service problems on the massive Union Pacific system threaten California's economy, state officials today plan to urge the federal Surface Transportation Board to impose sanctions on the railroad and to open its lines to competitors if the crisis is not resolved soon. On Tuesday, the National Transportation Safety Board announced plans to hold hearings on the safety record of the nation's largest railroad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1991 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raising the stakes in a longstanding battle over Mayor Tom Bradley's proposed rush hour truck ban, the California Trucking Assn. on Tuesday asked the state for permission to boost shipping rates by 75% if the Los Angeles plan is implemented. The latest salvo from the state's powerful trucking interests came as the mayor's staff is preparing to submit its plan to drastically limit truck traffic on city streets to the City Council for final adoption.
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local officials thought the risk posed by oil shipping along the Southern California coast ended a year ago when they denied Chevron's request to move oil by tanker from the Point Arguello offshore project. Santa Barbara County supervisors and the California Coastal Commission, which upheld the supervisors' decision, wanted the oil transported to Los Angeles by overland pipeline, which they consider environmentally safer than tankers.
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