Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShipping Los Angeles County
IN THE NEWS

Shipping Los Angeles County

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 20, 1999 | Bloomberg News
The ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles received more imports in October than a year earlier, as retailers continued to stock up for the holiday shopping season and build inventory before 2000. Exports were also up, for the fifth straight month in Los Angeles and the third consecutive month in Long Beach. Shippers brought 204,000 containers last month into the Port of Long Beach, up 13% from October 1998, as imports of toys and other consumer goods rose.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 20, 2000 | Stephen Gregory
The Port of Long Beach handled a crush of import cargo in May that nearly matched the volume of inbound trade handled during last year's busiest shipping month, officials said. Port trade analyst Matt Plezia said the May cargo figures from the nation's second-busiest port underscore the continued attraction the humming U.S. consumer market exerts on Asian manufacturers. It's also a possible sign that U.S.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1996
Shippers hampered by the labor slowdown at the Los Angeles and Long Beach ports said Monday that the flow of freight is returning to normal even as thousands of union truck drivers stay off the job for a second week. "It's high enough to where we're not getting an accumulation of containers at the terminals," said Robert Kleist, an advisor to the Evergreen America Corp. and a member of the Steamship Assn. of Southern California board.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1999 | Bloomberg News
The ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles received more imports in October than a year earlier, as retailers continued to stock up for the holiday shopping season and build inventory before 2000. Exports were also up, for the fifth straight month in Los Angeles and the third consecutive month in Long Beach. Shippers brought 204,000 containers last month into the Port of Long Beach, up 13% from October 1998, as imports of toys and other consumer goods rose.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1996 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a year, the independent truckers who carry cargo to and from the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach have protested what they considered long delays at the docks and paltry wages by forming big-rig convoys on freeways and gridlocking downtown streets. And for weeks, hundreds more unionized drivers employed by the big trucking firms have been talking about a strike. Today, is what shippers are calling "Crunch Day"--when the whole feud is expected to shift into high gear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1996 | LAURA ACCINELLI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The road under Franklin Rodriguez's rig has never been paved with gold, but lately it's littered with obstacles. Buckling under the combined strain of higher costs, cutthroat competition and longer delays at ever-busier docks in Long Beach and Los Angeles, independent trucker Rodriguez has realized he can't afford to be his own boss. Not anymore. "The owner-operator has lost his right to bargain with the companies we work for. You can't tell them what you need.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1996 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Truck traffic at the normally bustling ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach plummeted Wednesday as thousands of truckers stayed off the job as part of an increasingly tense labor feud. Cargo carriers reported that operations were slowed to 20% of their normal pace in some cases. At Hyundai America Shipping Agency, officials rerouted a 4,400-container vessel, the Hyundai Federal, to deliver inland-bound cargo to Seattle instead of Long Beach, where those containers are usually unloaded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1998 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A controversial plan to lease land at the former Long Beach Naval Station to a Chinese shipping line may be back on the table after an appeals court decided that the Port of Long Beach followed state law in its environmental review process. As a result, if the Navy turns over 300 acres of the closed Navy base to the port, harbor officials can again approach China Ocean Shipping Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1996 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A labor standoff at the nation's busiest harbor complex lurched into its fourth day Thursday as thousands of truckers stood idle and shippers watched stacks of stranded freight containers slowly rise. The access roads and loading lots at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach barely rustled under the morning fog, but shippers said operations appeared to pick up modestly over Wednesday, estimating that truck traffic was between 30% and 50% of normal.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2000 | Stephen Gregory
The Port of Long Beach handled a crush of import cargo in May that nearly matched the volume of inbound trade handled during last year's busiest shipping month, officials said. Port trade analyst Matt Plezia said the May cargo figures from the nation's second-busiest port underscore the continued attraction the humming U.S. consumer market exerts on Asian manufacturers. It's also a possible sign that U.S.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1999 | Stephen Gregory
Representatives from labor, management and the shipping industry are scheduled today to discuss the impact on local ports of the recently ratified labor agreement between longshore workers and the Pacific Maritime Assn., which represents steamship lines and terminal operators along the West Coast. The three-year contract, approved Aug. 25 by the International Longshore & Warehouse Union, increases pay, health insurance and pension benefits.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County's two sprawling ports will maintain their dominance over rival seaports in the Bay Area and Pacific Northwest over the next two decades when cargo volume is expected to more than double, according to a study released Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1998 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A controversial plan to lease land at the former Long Beach Naval Station to a Chinese shipping line may be back on the table after an appeals court decided that the Port of Long Beach followed state law in its environmental review process. As a result, if the Navy turns over 300 acres of the closed Navy base to the port, harbor officials can again approach China Ocean Shipping Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1997 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under intense political pressure, the California Coastal Commission on Wednesday approved a permit that will allow the Port of Long Beach to bury tons of contaminated silt offshore as part of the construction of a new shipping terminal.
NEWS
May 8, 1996 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long-festering labor ruckus that has hampered steamship lines and trucking companies around the nation's busiest harbor complex for more than a week is on the verge of reaching a boiling point, with the future of the Southern California shipping industry in doubt and the reputations of the Los Angeles and Long Beach ports on the line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1996
Shippers hampered by the labor slowdown at the Los Angeles and Long Beach ports said Monday that the flow of freight is returning to normal even as thousands of union truck drivers stay off the job for a second week. "It's high enough to where we're not getting an accumulation of containers at the terminals," said Robert Kleist, an advisor to the Evergreen America Corp. and a member of the Steamship Assn. of Southern California board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1997 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under intense political pressure, the California Coastal Commission on Wednesday approved a permit that will allow the Port of Long Beach to bury tons of contaminated silt offshore as part of the construction of a new shipping terminal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1996 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a year, the independent truckers who carry cargo to and from the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach have protested what they considered long delays at the docks and paltry wages by forming big-rig convoys on freeways and gridlocking downtown streets. And for weeks, hundreds more unionized drivers employed by the big trucking firms have been talking about a strike. Today is what shippers are calling "Crunch Day"--when the whole feud could hit high gear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1996 | LAURA ACCINELLI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The road under Franklin Rodriguez's rig has never been paved with gold, but lately it's littered with obstacles. Buckling under the combined strain of higher costs, cutthroat competition and longer delays at ever-busier docks in Long Beach and Los Angeles, independent trucker Rodriguez has realized he can't afford to be his own boss. Not anymore. "The owner-operator has lost his right to bargain with the companies we work for. You can't tell them what you need.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1996 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A labor standoff at the nation's busiest harbor complex lurched into its fourth day Thursday as thousands of truckers stood idle and shippers watched stacks of stranded freight containers slowly rise. The access roads and loading lots at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach barely rustled under the morning fog, but shippers said operations appeared to pick up modestly over Wednesday, estimating that truck traffic was between 30% and 50% of normal.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|