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Shipping Middle East

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BUSINESS
February 28, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With an end to the Gulf War imminent, international commerce--notably air travel and shipping--is beginning to show signs of life, though the recession and concerns about terrorism are expected to stifle a full-fledged recovery. Executives at airlines, hotels and travel agencies say that bookings are up slightly, largely because of hefty air fare discounts. One hotel chain said reservations surged 25% earlier this month after America West Airlines offered half-price tickets in a three-day sale.
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BUSINESS
February 28, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With an end to the Gulf War imminent, international commerce--notably air travel and shipping--is beginning to show signs of life, though the recession and concerns about terrorism are expected to stifle a full-fledged recovery. Executives at airlines, hotels and travel agencies say that bookings are up slightly, largely because of hefty air fare discounts. One hotel chain said reservations surged 25% earlier this month after America West Airlines offered half-price tickets in a three-day sale.
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BUSINESS
January 12, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though bomb-laden airplanes and missiles would be shrieking overhead, oil tankers and other commercial vessels that ply the Persian Gulf are not expected to become targets if war breaks out between U.S.-led forces and Iraq. While brokers and industry analysts believe commercial vessels would steer clear of Saudi Arabian ports in the first few days of hostilities, most believe that major disruptions to world shipping would be avoided.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE and DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It is a jet-age pony express, ducking Scud missile attacks to get parcels to businessmen when even the post office is closed. Toting gas masks and antidotes for Iraq's poison gas, drivers for DHL International thread their way daily through Saudi Arabia's sun-baked Eastern Province, close to the front lines of the Persian Gulf War. It is a tricky business. Air raid warnings have delayed cargo-laden DHL turboprops headed for outlying towns.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE and DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It is a jet-age pony express, ducking Scud missile attacks to get parcels to businessmen when even the post office is closed. Toting gas masks and antidotes for Iraq's poison gas, drivers for DHL International thread their way daily through Saudi Arabia's sun-baked Eastern Province, close to the front lines of the Persian Gulf War. It is a tricky business. Air raid warnings have delayed cargo-laden DHL turboprops headed for outlying towns.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though bomb-laden airplanes and missiles would be shrieking overhead, oil tankers and other commercial vessels that ply the Persian Gulf are not expected to become targets if war breaks out between U.S.-led forces and Iraq. While brokers and industry analysts believe commercial vessels would steer clear of Saudi Arabian ports in the first few days of hostilities, most believe that major disruptions to world shipping would be avoided.
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