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BUSINESS
April 20, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Port of San Francisco, criticized in years past for sloppy management and bungled opportunities, on Thursday released a long-awaited strategic plan calling for hefty investments in its money-losing cargo container facilities and outmoded fish-handling facilities. Unveiled at a news conference in the historic waterfront Ferry Building by Executive Director Michael P.
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BUSINESS
April 20, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Port of San Francisco, criticized in years past for sloppy management and bungled opportunities, on Thursday released a long-awaited strategic plan calling for hefty investments in its money-losing cargo container facilities and outmoded fish-handling facilities. Unveiled at a news conference in the historic waterfront Ferry Building by Executive Director Michael P.
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BUSINESS
October 19, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE and JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
People trying to do business with the Bay Area faced frustrations Wednesday as Tuesday's earthquake disrupted telephone and computer communication and shipments by truck between that city and the rest of the country. The Pacific Stock Exchange was forced to shut down options trading altogether but continued to trade stock at its floor in downtown Los Angeles. Volume, however, was extraordinarily light.
NEWS
October 24, 1989 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Navy is under some peculiar sailing orders here, providing everything from a floating shelter for the homeless to amphibious mail delivery. Three San Diego-based vessels--the Peleliu, an amphibious helicopter assault vessel; the Fort Fisher, a dock landing ship; and the Schenectady, a tank landing ship--weighed anchor in San Francisco Bay on Friday with about 1,650 Marines and sailors reporting for disaster duty.
NEWS
October 24, 1989 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Navy is under some peculiar sailing orders here, providing everything from a floating shelter for the homeless to amphibious mail delivery. Three San Diego-based vessels--the Peleliu, an amphibious helicopter assault vessel; the Fort Fisher, a dock landing ship; and the Schenectady, a tank landing ship--weighed anchor in San Francisco Bay on Friday with about 1,650 Marines and sailors reporting for disaster duty.
OPINION
March 8, 2008
Re "Full speed ahead," editorial, Feb. 29 Rather than celebrating as described in your editorial, our members have been discussing what actions the industry can take to move forward to reduce air emissions. To that end, our board of directors is recommending that our members continue to use low-sulfur fuel in auxiliary engines at 24 nautical miles. Our lawsuit did not challenge the state's authority to regulate emissions, but rather that the state needed to get a waiver from the Environmental Protection Agency.
NEWS
February 23, 1986 | ANNE C. ROARK
It was a summery day in late September, 1924. In the bustling Latino neighborhood east of downtown Los Angeles, a small group of people were standing near a boarding house at 700 Clara St. Some were discussing the various merits of Calvin Coolidge, John William Davis and Robert Marion LaFollette in the forthcoming presidential election. Others were gossiping about the upcoming Rose Bowl, to which Ernie Nevers was sure to take Stanford.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2012 | By Michael Woo
The Chinatown War Chinese Los Angeles and the Massacre of 1871 Scott Zesch Oxford University Press: 272 pp., $29.95 You know about the 1965 Watts riots (34 deaths) and the 1992 Los Angeles riots (53 deaths). But you probably know less about the shocking violence that stained the mean streets near the current locations of Union Station, Olvera Street and the Civic Center on the night of Oct. 24, 1871. Los Angeles had few pretensions in those days. In the early 1870s, California's new wealth generated by the Gold Rush, the growth of agriculture and the expansion of transcontinental railroads and trans-Pacific shipping made San Francisco the dominant urban center of the state.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE and JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
People trying to do business with the Bay Area faced frustrations Wednesday as Tuesday's earthquake disrupted telephone and computer communication and shipments by truck between that city and the rest of the country. The Pacific Stock Exchange was forced to shut down options trading altogether but continued to trade stock at its floor in downtown Los Angeles. Volume, however, was extraordinarily light.
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