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BUSINESS
February 10, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As oil from a ruptured tanker laps at the beaches of Orange County, a final study released Friday supports Chevron Corp.'s argument that it would be cheaper to ship crude oil by tanker from its Point Arguello offshore project than by pipeline or other means. The study, completed by consultants Arthur D. Little Inc. for Santa Barbara County, concludes that it would cost $2.55 to $2.65 a barrel for tankers to carry oil to Los Angeles from the $2-billion project.
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NEWS
April 16, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration, keenly embarrassed by Kuwait's seeming preference for Soviet help, still remains ready to protect merchant shipping in the Persian Gulf from Iranian missiles and artillery, State Department and Pentagon officials said Wednesday. "We are holding discussions with the nations bordering on the gulf about the nature of the Iranian threat and how U.S. policy can best be applied to the situation," a State Department official said. But he conceded that the prospect of using U.
NEWS
May 9, 1987 | Associated Press
An Iranian gunboat raked a Soviet freighter with cannon fire in the Persian Gulf, the first attack on a Soviet vessel since the Iran-Iraq War began 6 1/2 years ago, marine salvage executives reported Friday. The official Soviet news agency Tass branded the attack, which occurred Wednesday morning, as an "act of piracy." Shells hit the crew's quarters and started a small fire, but the crewmen escaped injury, one executive reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2006 | Deborah Schoch, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles port officials said Monday that a ship collided with the Vincent Thomas Bridge over the weekend because an onboard crane was left extended -- not because the bridge was too low. They said they were more concerned about the potential for problems as truck traffic on the bridge increases.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2001 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Microsoft Corp. may ship half as many Xbox video game consoles as originally promised when the machine launches Nov. 8, according to a video game industry analyst. Microsoft, which has said it will deliver 600,000 to 800,000 Xbox consoles to stores by Nov. 8, refused to comment Thursday. But analyst John G. Taylor of Arcadia Investments in Portland, Ore., said his conclusions were derived from sources at "almost all" major retailers that expect to carry the $299 game machine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1989
The captain of the cargo ship ordered to relinquish command in Long Beach Harbor early Saturday after the first mate reported him drunk and steering erratically was found to be legally too drunk to captain a ship, according to urine- and blood-alcohol tests released Tuesday by the Coast Guard. Tests taken 5 1/2 hours after Alan Jones, 58, gave up command showed that he had a blood-alcohol level of .07% and a urine-alcohol level of .09%, officials said. The Coast Guard recognizes .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1989 | GEORGE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Alan Jones, the 58-year-old captain ordered to give up command of a cargo ship after being reported drunk at the helm and steering erratically, was headed back to his native England Sunday, the U.S. Coast Guard announced. The Coast Guard said Saturday that it was investigating Jones for possible charges of negligence and the nautical equivalent of drunk driving. Both charges carry a possible fine of $5,000 and a one-year prison sentence.
NEWS
January 22, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A ship carrying cargo from China to the Middle East was recently inspected and found to contain illegal chemicals used for making dangerous weapons, U.S. officials acknowledged Friday. The ship Asian Senator, which is of German origin, was examined at a Saudi Arabian port in a new demonstration of the intensified U.S. and international campaign to stop the spread of deadly weapons and chemicals.
NEWS
June 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
In a major conciliatory gesture, South Korea said it will open a key waterway to North Korean commercial ships if they seek advance permission to pass through it. The decision came hours after Seoul allowed three North Korean cargo vessels to sail out of the narrow channel between South Korea's mainland and its southernmost island of Cheju after they had violated those territorial waters for more than eight hours. The channel has been open to all foreign ships except those from North Korea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2008 | Margot Roosevelt, Times Staff Writer
California regulators adopted the world's toughest pollution rules for oceangoing vessels Thursday, vowing to improve the health of coastal residents and opening a new front in a long battle with the international shipping industry. The rules, which take effect in 2009, would require ships within 24 nautical miles of California to burn low-sulfur diesel instead of the tar-like sludge known as bunker fuel.
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