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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
In an unusual move, a federal judge in Los Angeles on Monday sentenced a Santa Monica chiropractor to life in prison for strangling his wife and throwing her overboard on the last night of their honeymoon cruise to Mexico. "This is one of the cruelest murders I've ever seen," said U.S. District Judge James A.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
As thoroughbreds were groomed and prepped for the day's races, a group of elderly Japanese Americans circled the stables of Santa Anita in a tram. For six months in 1942, they lived here, in the same stalls where horses had slept, before being shipped to internment camps in isolated areas of the country. Back then, arriving adults mourned the loss of homes and businesses, while children explored the grounds, making new friends. In the barns, a thin layer of asphalt was all that separated families from layers of manure.
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MAGAZINE
April 12, 1987 | DAVID DEVOSS, David DeVoss is a Los Angeles Times Magazine staff writer.
ACROSS THE PACIFIC OCEAN, a never-ending war of maneuver is under way. It is a three-dimensional struggle--under sea, on the water and in the air--that pits the U.S. Navy against a Soviet fleet three times its size. The prize is control over half the world's surface. The weapons are multimillion-dollar ships and planes, as well as a vast array of sophisticated electronics that could provide the winning advantage if a conflict between the superpowers ever erupts.
WORLD
March 17, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan and Barbara Demick
The U.S. military pulled its warship out of the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 on Monday and will rely instead on sophisticated submarine-hunting aircraft, a sign of just how complex the international search for the missing Boeing 777 has become in its second week. At least 26 nations have deployed ships, aircraft and satellites in one of the largest international coalitions ever mustered in a search and rescue operation. Search teams are concentrating on wide bands in both the northern and southern hemispheres west of Malaysia, crossing the territories of a dozen Asian nations as well as the sparsely traveled waters of the southern Indian Ocean.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2010 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
On the high seas, full speed ahead is being replaced by slow and steady. Eager to cut fuel costs, ocean shipping lines have ordered their sea captains to throttle back the engines for what is quaintly known in the industry as "slow steaming." In some cases, freighters are taking as many as 15 days to make a Pacific crossing that used to take 11 days. Sailors grumble that it's making long voyages even more tedious. Some ships are crawling at just 12 to 14 knots, or about 14 to 16 mph. Many cargo ships are capable of moving at nearly twice that speed.
OPINION
December 9, 2012
Re "Malibu's great blight whale," Dec. 7 Once again we're reminded of the dangers that large whales face along the West Coast. Whales are forced to dodge ships traveling into port. Many don't make it. Ship strikes are one of the biggest remaining threats to the recovery of whales, and in the last decade they have become all too common. Our busy shipping lanes on the West Coast overlap with important foraging habitat for whales. The federal government, charged with protecting endangered species, needs to impose mandatory speed limits on vessels in whale habitats.
WORLD
February 5, 2009 | Associated Press
A ransom has been delivered to Somali pirates who seized a Ukrainian ship carrying tanks, heavy weapons and about 20 crew members, a spokesman for the ship's owners said Wednesday. Mikhail Voitenko did not say how much was paid, but Russia's Itar-Tass news agency put it at $3.2 million. The pirates originally demanded $20 million. The Faina was seized in September off Somalia. "The ransom has been delivered to the Faina.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
MOBILE, Ala. - The Triumph docked about 9:20 p.m. CST, and the first few passengers walked down the gangway and into the parking lot about an hour later. It was the first real look at what life has been like for those stranded aboard the Carnival Triumph adrift in the Gulf of Mexico. With only one working elevator, Carnival officials warned that it could take four or five hours for everyone to disembark at the port in Mobile. The process stretched into the early morning hours Friday as passengers were greeted with cheers from the crowd and were mobbed by television camera crews.
NATIONAL
May 6, 2009 | Rebecca Cole
The chief executive of a shipping company urged Congress on Tuesday to pass legislation allowing vessels to carry armed security. Testifying before a Senate subcommittee, Philip J. Shapiro of Liberty Maritime Corp. said that although an 1819 statute gave ships the right to defend themselves, they still were subject to laws and inconsistent port rules governing whether armed vessels could dock.
OPINION
May 29, 2002
Re "10 Chinese Nabbed After Coming Ashore in O.C.," May 24: To refer to the ships used by Asian smugglers and stowaways as "modern-day slave ships," to quote Immigration and Naturalization Service spokesman Bill Strassberger, is not only inaccurate, it is insulting. There is a vast difference between individuals willingly undertaking a perilous journey by sea "looking for a better economic future" and the Africans who were captured in their homeland, packed into steerage and delivered into bondage in the Americas.
WORLD
March 17, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
The Navy pulled out the guided-missile destroyer Kidd, with its two search and rescue helicopters, opting to rely on a pair of submarine-hunting aircraft from nearby land bases to scour the Indian Ocean for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. The San Diego-based destroyer with a crew of 314 and its MH-60 Seahawk helicopters have searched a combined 15,000 square miles since March 8, when the Boeing 777 mysteriously vanished. No debris or wreckage related to the aircraft or the 239 missing passengers and crew has been found.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Avast! The pirate ship that submerged in Big Bear Lake during a heavy winter storm will soon rise from its watery grave. The Big Bear Pirate Ship--a popular tourist draw in the mountain lake community about 100 miles east of downtown Los Angeles--sank during a storm Feb. 28 while it was tied off at Halloway's Marina. Crews plan to use inflatable lift bags Thursday morning to refloat the one-third scale replica of a 16th century Spanish galleon, also known as Time Bandit.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
CORNUCOPIA, Wis. - On some days, Kevin Hunt stands at his Star North gas station in this eye-blink of a town on mighty Lake Superior, marveling at Mother Nature and his own dumb luck. Everywhere he looks: ice and people. Months ago, many warned him not to invest in a place where fair-weather tourists flee in the fall and the big lake's waters turn cold and storm-tossed, forcing the 100 or so hardy full-time residents of Cornucopia to hibernate for the winter. He'd be out of business by March, they said.
WORLD
March 5, 2014 | By Batsheva Sobelman, This post has been updated. See the notes below for details.
JERUSALEM -- In a military operation in the international waters of the Red Sea, Israeli commandos intercepted a ship carrying Syrian-made rockets shipped from Iran and headed for the Gaza Strip, Israel's military announced Wednesday. According to Israeli army spokesman Motti Almoz , naval commandos boarded the ship about 950 miles from Israel without incident early Wednesday morning. Initial inspection of the cargo revealed dozens of M-302 rockets, concealed in containers covered with commercial-looking sacks of cement, Israeli officials said.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Chris Erskine
Arrrrgh! Last weekend's snow and heavy rains ravaged Big Bear's iconic Pirate Ship, which sank Friday night in heavy winds. The popular tourist attraction , a one-third scale replica of a 16 th century Spanish galleon, had been docked at Holloway's Marina. Owner Loren Hafen said the fully winterized vessel was last inspected about 4 p.m. Friday, and a marina employee discovered it submerged at 8 a.m. Saturday. Using scuba gear, Hafen inspected the hull Monday and found no holes or significant structural damage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2014 | By Rick Rojas
PALM SPRINGS - On a bright and breezy afternoon, the continuous stream of tourists queued up on a bustling downtown corner for their moment with Marilyn. The icon loomed some 26 feet high in a re-creation of that classic image of Monroe in the air-blown white dress. She seemed blissfully oblivious as one person after another posed between her legs, resting a hand on her calf. A few climbed up onto her stilettos. "It's always like this!" Mayor Steve Pougnet said, standing amid the crowd that had assembled on a weekday afternoon.
NEWS
June 6, 1989 | From Reuters
Rotterdam dockers refused today to handle two Chinese cargo ships in protest against the killing of demonstrators in Beijing, a dock union spokesman said. The morning shift boycotted the only two Chinese ships in port.
WORLD
February 6, 2009 | Associated Press
Somali pirates released a Ukrainian freighter carrying heavy arms Thursday and sped away with a $3.2-million ransom as U.S. Navy ships watched, ending a four-month standoff that focused world attention on piracy off Somalia's lawless coast. The Navy said it couldn't seize the bandits for fear of endangering 147 seamen held hostage on other hijacked ships.
NATIONAL
February 24, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
A portion of the lower Mississippi River reopened Monday after a weekend oil spill, but another stretch remained closed, leaving 29 ships stuck, according to U.S. Coast Guard officials. Officials had closed a 65-mile stretch of the river and the port of New Orleans after 31,500 gallons of light crude oil spilled from a barge that ran into a towboat Saturday about 50 miles west of New Orleans. On Monday, officials reopened a portion of the river east of the spill to vessels with Coast Guard approval.
NATIONAL
February 20, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
The Maersk Alabama, featured in the movie “Captain Phillips,” has left the Seychelles after authorities completed the investigation into the deaths of two Americans, one of whom was a former Navy SEAL. On Tuesday, two Americans were found dead in a cabin on the ship, berthed in Port of Victoria in the island nation of the Seychelles in the Indian Ocean. Neither officials nor the company have said what happened. “Maersk Alabama was cleared to leave the Seychelles when the authorities completed their onboard investigation,” company spokesman Kevin N. Speers said in an e-mailed statement.
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