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NEWS
October 7, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Countries along the route of the Akatsuki Maru, a Japanese ship on its way to France to pick up a ton of plutonium, are objecting in growing numbers to having the deadly cargo transported through their back yards. "We think the proposed shipment of plutonium through Pacific waters poses a significant risk to us and to other Pacific peoples," Bernard Dowiyogo, president of the tiny Pacific island republic of Nauru, told anti-nuclear activists who packed a small auditorium in Tokyo last weekend.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Shifting between modern offices in Copenhagen and a run-down cargo ship in the Indian Ocean, the new thriller "A Hijacking" focuses on the negotiations that ensue when Somali pirates overtake the vessel. Writer-director Tobias Lindholm ignites a pressure-cooker drama by lacing the story with details drawn from real life and subjecting the cast to some of the unpleasant ones. Playing in limited release, "A Hijacking" ratchets up the tension with a startling sense of authenticity, blurring the line between reality and fiction.
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TRAVEL
March 23, 1986 | SHIRLEY SLATER and HARRY BASCH
While international airports around the world seem to be bristling with highly visible security forces and armed guards, cruise ships in port--admittedly not nearly as vulnerable to hijacking as airplanes--are responding with a variety of security measures.
TRAVEL
September 22, 1996 | TIMES STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
While airline security has grabbed headlines following the July 17 explosion of TWA Flight 800, cruise lines have been quietly working to formalize their own security procedures. By Oct. 16, about 25 U.S. ports and the 200 passenger ships that visit them must submit security plans to the U.S. Coast Guard, according to Cmdr. Dennis Haise, a Coast Guard project director in Washington, D.C. The plans require each ship to state how it would respond to various threat levels.
TRAVEL
September 22, 1996 | TIMES STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
While airline security has grabbed headlines following the July 17 explosion of TWA Flight 800, cruise lines have been quietly working to formalize their own security procedures. By Oct. 16, about 25 U.S. ports and the 200 passenger ships that visit them must submit security plans to the U.S. Coast Guard, according to Cmdr. Dennis Haise, a Coast Guard project director in Washington, D.C. The plans require each ship to state how it would respond to various threat levels.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Shifting between modern offices in Copenhagen and a run-down cargo ship in the Indian Ocean, the new thriller "A Hijacking" focuses on the negotiations that ensue when Somali pirates overtake the vessel. Writer-director Tobias Lindholm ignites a pressure-cooker drama by lacing the story with details drawn from real life and subjecting the cast to some of the unpleasant ones. Playing in limited release, "A Hijacking" ratchets up the tension with a startling sense of authenticity, blurring the line between reality and fiction.
OPINION
July 11, 2012
Re "Is cruise ships' crime drop real?," July 2 The article presented an unbalanced portrayal of security on board cruise ships. The security personnel working for members of the Cruise Lines International Assn. expend significant efforts responding to incidents, which are communicated to appropriate law enforcement agencies as required by law. We are not aware of any situation in which a passenger reported a serious crime to a cruise line that was not reported to the appropriate law enforcement authorities.
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | JIM MANN and PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration is now waging a final, intensive effort to obtain as much international support and as broad a legal justification as possible for military action against Iraqi ships, hoping to head off charges that only Western powers support the use of force.
NEWS
November 2, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a bomb blasted a hole in the U.S. destroyer Cole last month, U.S. officials first portrayed the incident as a case of a well-guarded warship falling victim to the kind of calamities that are bound to occur when American forces patrol the dangerous Middle East. In the weeks since, however, additional information has come to light on how well-protected the warship really was.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union is taking advantage of a complex of economic, colonial and nuclear issues, including the tendency of U.S. tuna fishermen to thumb their noses at local peoples, to penetrate deeper than ever before into an area of the globe that the United States has long thought of as its own: the South Pacific. Last year, for example, the Soviets bought licenses to fish off Kiribati, the former Gilbert Islands, whose capital, Tarawa, was captured by U.S.
NEWS
October 7, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Countries along the route of the Akatsuki Maru, a Japanese ship on its way to France to pick up a ton of plutonium, are objecting in growing numbers to having the deadly cargo transported through their back yards. "We think the proposed shipment of plutonium through Pacific waters poses a significant risk to us and to other Pacific peoples," Bernard Dowiyogo, president of the tiny Pacific island republic of Nauru, told anti-nuclear activists who packed a small auditorium in Tokyo last weekend.
TRAVEL
March 23, 1986 | SHIRLEY SLATER and HARRY BASCH
While international airports around the world seem to be bristling with highly visible security forces and armed guards, cruise ships in port--admittedly not nearly as vulnerable to hijacking as airplanes--are responding with a variety of security measures.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | RICHARD T. COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The way Machinist's Mate 2nd Class David Harden of Decatur, Ala., remembered it Thursday, the first he heard about a summit conference was several weeks ago, when the skipper announced over the intercom that the cruiser Belknap might soon play host to President Bush and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
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