Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShips
IN THE NEWS

Ships

NATIONAL
February 20, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Police found drugs and drug paraphernalia in the cabin where two ex-Navy SEALs were found dead earlier this week, according to a company spokesman. The bodies of security contractors Mark Daniel Kennedy, 43, of Baton Rouge, La., and Jeffrey Reynolds, 44, were discovered in a cabin of the Maersk Alabama on Tuesday while at port in the Seychelles in the Indian Ocean. The ship is widely known for having been hijacked by Somalian pirates in 2009, an event was dramatized in the 2013 Tom Hanks movie "Captain Phillips.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Two American security officers and former Navy SEALs have been found dead on board the Maersk Alabama, the cargo ship whose hijacking by Somali pirates inspired the film "Captain Phillips," Seychelles Island police said Wednesday. According to police , Jeffrey Reynolds and Mark Kennedy, both 44, were discovered dead by a colleague who went to check on Kennedy late Tuesday afternoon while the ship was moored in Port Victoria. No cause of death was given and an investigation is underway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
SAN DIEGO - Above the water line, the Point Loma wharf at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography is impressive: large, high-tech ships dock there before cruising off to research sea life and climate conditions around the world. The skyline of downtown San Diego skyscrapers looms across the bay. Underwater, however, is a much less glamorous view of the concrete pier and wharf, with rotten and broken pilings, exposed rebar and dangling wooden supports. It is a glimpse, scientists say, of the worrisome decay that could threaten their efforts to better understand tsunamis, seismic faults and the effect of pollution on fish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2014 | By Nita Lelyveld
Painful memories have the power to surface fresh and raw, even after many years. A great-grandmother once again can become a terrified little girl. A grandfather surrounded by friends and family can feel all alone in a vicious world. So it was at the Los Angeles Jewish Home in Reseda the other afternoon, when the drama club put on a play. The audience was made up almost entirely of octogenarians and nonagenarians. The cast ranged in age from 85 to 92. The performance understandably didn't rely on action.
TRAVEL
February 1, 2014 | By Karl Zimmermann
SWANSEA, Wales - The Patricia is a small, hardworking ship that putters around the coast of England and Wales, tending buoys and lighthouses. At 283 feet long, it's about a quarter the length of Cunard's vaunted Queen Mary 2 ocean liner. And yet the Patricia is even more properly British and perhaps even more luxurious, having as it does six handsomely furnished, spacious passenger cabins on its upper decks - one of which once was Prince Philip's cabin of choice. And now it would be ours.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
For the first time, more than 1 billion smartphones were shipped worldwide in a single year, according to a report this week. A total of 1.004 billion smartphones were shipped to vendors in 2013, meaning phone makers sold those devices to wireless carriers, retailers or directly to their customers, according to a report by International Data Corporation. The 2013 figure is up 38.4% from the 725.3 million smartphones that phone makers shipped in 2012. Smartphones accounted for 55.1% of all the mobile phones shipped last year, the report said.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
BAYONNE, N.J. -- At first he thought it was the fish. Maurice Weizmann, a Montreal businessman on a Royal Caribbean cruise with his wife, started vomiting on the second night of the 10-day voyage after eating dinner and watching a show on the ship Explorer of the Seas. His wife did too. Soon they learned the reality: They were only two of hundreds of passengers sickened by a yet-unidentified gastrointestinal illness that shortened their cruise by two days and created a floating sick bay on the high seas.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
BAYONNE, N.J. - At first he thought it was the fish. Maurice Weizmann, a Montreal businessman on a Royal Caribbean cruise with his wife, started vomiting on the second night of the 10-day voyage after eating dinner and watching a show on the ship Explorer of the Seas. His wife did too. Soon they learned the reality: They were only two of hundreds of passengers sickened by an as-yet unidentified gastrointestinal illness that shortened their cruise by two days and created a floating sick bay on the high seas.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
The gig: Miguel Gonzalez Reynoso, 63, is co-president of Northgate Gonzalez Markets, a chain of family-owned supermarkets in Southern California. Its first store was small, a 2,500-square-foot market that opened in Anaheim in 1980. Recognize a good name: That store on Anaheim Boulevard took over space formerly occupied by a market called Northgate. The family couldn't afford to change the sign, so it kept the name. Now, he's happy they did. "We came to think of Northgate as the door of opportunity for us, coming from the south," said Gonzalez Reynoso, whose large family, with 13 brothers and sisters, hails from Mexico's Jalisco state.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
The plight of the Lyubov Orlova has grabbed the imagination of the media with its tale of cannibal rats" aboard an abandoned vessel drifting in the north Atlantic -- possibly toward the U.K. On Thursday, reports surfaced that high winds could be pushing the vessel and its rats toward the shore of western Ireland, Scotland or the southern tip of England. If it weren't for the starving rodents believed to be feeding on one another on the craft, the story of this cruise vessel turned ghost ship could have an aura of romance.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|