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Shipwrecks

NEWS
August 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
Flush with success, researchers returned Thursday to the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald hoping for more startlingly clear views of the famed vessel 556 feet beneath the surface of Lake Superior. "The tension is off," said Carol Swinehart of Michigan Sea Grant, one of the sponsors of an expedition to explore shipwrecks with a small, deep-water robot that takes three-dimensional video pictures.
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NATIONAL
April 16, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Nineteen years after discovering the Titanic, underwater explorer Robert Ballard announced he was returning to the luxury liner to document its deterioration, and to push for international backing to preserve it and other shipwrecks as permanent memorials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1995 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By all accounts, Darren Douglass was among the most accomplished scuba divers on the West Coast: underwater photographer, editor of a dive boat magazine, leader of charter excursions to the deep. It was Douglass who was in charge, officials said, when a cadre of wet-suited explorers splashed overboard from the dive boat Atlantis on Sunday. It was Douglass who led the way through the murky depths as they plumbed the wreck of a sunken ship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Outgunned and outmanned by a British fleet in the dismal fall of 1776, a small group of gunboats under the command of Benedict Arnold fought a delaying action in Lake Champlain. Although the British won the battle and all but one of the American ships was sunk or scuttled, Arnold's fierce resistance and the time-consuming preparations it forced upon the British delayed a massive invasion by British land forces until the following year.
NEWS
July 31, 1997 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Marine archeologists using an undersea robot to prowl the Mediterranean Sea floor discovered what may be the largest concentration of ancient shipwrecks ever found in the deep sea, one of them a Roman ship dating from before the time of Christ, the researchers announced Wednesday. The discovery, which spans more than 2,000 years of human history, offers an unusual glimpse into mankind's maritime past, experts in marine archeology said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1988 | From Reuters
A court here Thursday dismissed charges against a group of foreign scuba divers, including three Southern Californians who escaped, who have been held for the past 10 weeks for trespassing in Indonesian waters. Presiding Judge Munziri Syarkawish upheld objections by the defense counsel that the allegations constituted a defamation of the accused.
WORLD
June 20, 2002 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warren White and his son were swimming just off the beach when they saw it. About 16 feet below them, a mass of coral and rock reared up from the sandy bottom. On top, in plain view, sat two coral-encrusted cannons. "Look at those guns," White thought. "Those things are ancient." So ancient, in fact, that White and a handful of scholars have come to believe that the wreck is one of Christopher Columbus' ships, the Vizcaina, abandoned in 1503 during his last voyage.
NEWS
December 27, 1986 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
For years, Robert F. Marx has dreamed of the mighty Manila galleon fleet and the billions of dollars in treasure he believes it holds at the bottom of the seas around the Philippines.
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court said Monday that it will revisit one of the worst maritime disasters in California history: the sinking of the Brother Jonathan, a Gold Rush-era paddle steamer that went down off the North Coast with the loss of 147 lives July 30, 1865. The court will decide whether the shipwreck is the property of the state of California or the diving company that discovered it four years ago embedded in the sea bottom a few miles off Crescent City.
NEWS
August 22, 1989 | BARRY BEARAK, Times Staff Writer
The sailboat was on automatic pilot, and the two Butlers were asleep down below. They were awakened by a thump, then another. William went topside, and that's when he first saw the whales in the moonlight. Dozens of them, he remembers. Maybe even hundreds. Whales as far as he could see. At first, only a few nudged the boat, the 38-foot Siboney. He and his wife, Simone, stared into the blackness of the equatorial Pacific. They could hear the whooshing noises, the great animals' blowing.
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