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NATIONAL
April 3, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Carnival's cursed cruise ship Triumph broke loose from its moorings Wednesday when strong winds hit Mobile, Ala., and two shipyard workers fell into the Mobile River. One was still missing by evening.  Helicopters and search teams scoured the river for the employee of BAE Systems shipyard. The other one was rescued and hospitalized with mild hypothermia. The Triumph was at the shipyard undergoing repairs after a disastrous February cruise , when an engine fire knocked out power.
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WORLD
November 6, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Britain, once the world's mightiest seafaring power, announced Wednesday that it will shut down the last naval shipyard in England, eliminating nearly 1,000 jobs and closing a chapter of history stretching back hundreds of years. Workers in the southern city of Portsmouth have been building warships since the reign of King Henry VIII, including the famous Mary Rose. But citing dwindling demand, the government and defense contractor BAE Systems have agreed to cease construction there.
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WORLD
November 6, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Britain, once the world's mightiest seafaring power, announced Wednesday that it will shut down the last naval shipyard in England, eliminating nearly 1,000 jobs and closing a chapter of history stretching back hundreds of years. Workers in the southern city of Portsmouth have been building warships since the reign of King Henry VIII, including the famous Mary Rose. But citing dwindling demand, the government and defense contractor BAE Systems have agreed to cease construction there.
NATIONAL
April 4, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Rescuers called off the search for a missing shipyard worker who fell into the Mobile River after strong winds blew the beleaguered Carnival cruise ship Triumph off its moorings and into a pier. The Triumph had been at the BAE Systems shipyard in Mobile, Ala., for repairs after a disastrous February cruise that left it without power for five days. The more than 4,000 people aboard had to cope with urine and feces in hallways, spoiled food and long lines for the few working toilets while tugboats ushered the ship back to port.
TRAVEL
April 15, 2012 | By James Bartlett, Special to the Los Angeles Times
BELFAST, Northern Ireland - Everyone knows how the tale of the Titanic ends, but what of its beginning? The Titanic was born in Belfast, along with its sister Olympic-class ships, the Olympicand the Gigantic (later renamed the Britan¿nic). A new Titanic Belfast museum openedlast month, and there's also a year-long sched¿ule of events celebrating the Titanic's 100thanniversary that includes two exhibitions at the Ulster Folk & Transport Museum, on 170acres outside Belfast. As soon as you enter the "Designing Titanic" section, you're transported into the world of the Harland & Wolff shipyard: The sounds of crashing pipes, banging hammers and shouting workmen are heard throughout.
NEWS
December 3, 1986 | United Press International
The nuclear-powered attack submarine San Juan will be launched Saturday at the Electric Boat Division shipyard in Groton, Conn., the Navy announced Tuesday.
NEWS
February 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Navy will pay $1 million to repair the Spruance, a destroyer that ran aground on a coral reef in the Bahamas last month, officials said. Repairs to the ship's propellers and mast began this week at a shipyard in Pascagoula, Miss., and should be completed this month.
NEWS
May 31, 1989 | From Reuters
A young unionist at South Korea's second biggest shipyard set fire to himself and jumped from the roof of a four-story building to protest a freeze on wages, company officials said Tuesday. They said that Lee Sang Mo, 20, of the Daewoo business group's shipyard on the southern island of Koje, doused himself with alcohol, set himself on fire and jumped from the roof of a dormitory block. He died in a hospital, setting off an overnight sit-in by more than 500 workers. Company officials said that production at the yard, already in financial difficulties, was not affected.
NATIONAL
April 4, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Rescuers called off the search for a missing shipyard worker who fell into the Mobile River after strong winds blew the beleaguered Carnival cruise ship Triumph off its moorings and into a pier. The Triumph had been at the BAE Systems shipyard in Mobile, Ala., for repairs after a disastrous February cruise that left it without power for five days. The more than 4,000 people aboard had to cope with urine and feces in hallways, spoiled food and long lines for the few working toilets while tugboats ushered the ship back to port.
NEWS
August 26, 1987
South Korea's main opposition alliance called for workers to hold a general strike the day Lee Suk Kyu, the shipyard striker killed last weekend, is buried. No date has been set for the burial. Lee's death, the first in the current outbreak of labor disputes, is being used by co-workers to pressure management to settle an 18-day-old strike. The National Coalition for a Democratic Constitution said Lee's death shows "how false and deceitful" was President Chun Doo Hwan's promise of reform.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Carnival's cursed cruise ship Triumph broke loose from its moorings Wednesday when strong winds hit Mobile, Ala., and two shipyard workers fell into the Mobile River. One was still missing by evening.  Helicopters and search teams scoured the river for the employee of BAE Systems shipyard. The other one was rescued and hospitalized with mild hypothermia. The Triumph was at the shipyard undergoing repairs after a disastrous February cruise , when an engine fire knocked out power.
TRAVEL
April 15, 2012 | By James Bartlett, Special to the Los Angeles Times
BELFAST, Northern Ireland - Everyone knows how the tale of the Titanic ends, but what of its beginning? The Titanic was born in Belfast, along with its sister Olympic-class ships, the Olympicand the Gigantic (later renamed the Britan¿nic). A new Titanic Belfast museum openedlast month, and there's also a year-long sched¿ule of events celebrating the Titanic's 100thanniversary that includes two exhibitions at the Ulster Folk & Transport Museum, on 170acres outside Belfast. As soon as you enter the "Designing Titanic" section, you're transported into the world of the Harland & Wolff shipyard: The sounds of crashing pipes, banging hammers and shouting workmen are heard throughout.
HEALTH
February 27, 2012 | By Bob Rosenblatt, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Workers swarmed through Henry J. Kaiser's Richmond, Calif., shipyard in World War II, building 747 ships for the Navy. The war "had siphoned off the most hardy specimens," a newspaper reported, so Kaiser was left with many workers too young, old or infirm to be drafted. The workers needed to be in good health to be effective on the job, and Kaiser offered them care from doctors in company clinics and at company hospitals. The workers paid 50 cents a week for the benefit. It was something new in industrial America - a bonus offered to attract scarce labor while wages were frozen during the war. The war ended, the workers quit the shipyards, leaving behind hospitals and doctors but no patients.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2011 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
At the West Coast's last major shipyard, the action never seems to stop. In one part of the Nassco yard, on the shores of San Diego Bay, the U.S. naval ship Medgar Evers is nearing completion. The 690-foot vessel is the 13th in a line of T-AKE ammunition and dry cargo ships built by Nassco for the Navy and is scheduled to roll into the ocean Oct. 29 wearing bunting and steamers to the blare of "Anchors Aweigh. " Next to it, No. 14 — this one called the Cesar Chavez — sits at a much earlier stage of construction.
OPINION
January 11, 2011 | Jim Newton
Amid the mountainous shipping containers that crowd the Port of Los Angeles, an emblematic battle is underway ? one that involves environmental protection, historic conservation, jobs, political turf and dirt. Lots and lots of dirt. FOR THE RECORD: Port: A Jan. 11 Op-Ed column about the Port of Los Angeles misspelled attorney Ben Reznik's name as Reznick.? The principal contestants in this faceoff are the staff of the Port of Los Angeles on one side and would-be shipbuilder Robert Stein on the other.
FOOD
July 29, 2010
  Shipyard Brewing Old Thumper Shipyard describes this as a nontraditional English bitter ale. It's closest to the extra special bitter, or ESB, style, which is bigger and hoppier than the usual English bitter. (Of course, neither is anywhere near as hoppy as a West Coast India pale ale, because nothing is.) One thing that might make Old Thumper nontraditional is the inclusion of some roasted malts, which gives a fleeting suggestion of a darker beer. Because Shipyard has been making this beer for more than 15 years, though, by American standards it is a tradition.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
The owner of a fireworks company wants President Bush to have a blast to mark Independence Day. George Zambelli, who was hired by an anonymous benefactor, said his 15-minute pyrotechnics performance for the President will use about two tons of fireworks and go beyond what the donor has paid for. "We're showing off our best, simply speaking," said Zambelli, whose family has been setting off fireworks in the United States since 1893. The fireworks display will be held Monday at Bush's seaside home at Walkers Point near Kennebunkport, Me. Bush is scheduled to arrive in Kennebunkport on Friday and stay through July 5. Zambelli said Bush has seen more than two dozen shows put on by his firm, Zambelli Internationale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1989
A chart of National Steel & Shipbuilding Co.'s recent history in San Diego would have many more valleys than peaks. Strikes, major wage concessions, fatal accidents and lost contracts have plagued the shipyard, which has shrunk from a high of 7,600 employees in 1980 to about 2,500 today. Perhaps the most optimistic comment one could make about the West Coast's only remaining major shipbuilder is that it is still alive, since foreign competition has defeated many other U. S. shipyards.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
With demand from the Navy for military ships declining, Northrop Grumman Corp. said Tuesday it was closing its Avondale, La., shipyard and may get out of the shipbuilding business altogether. The site near New Orleans employs about 5,000 people. Operations there will be consolidated with the company's Pascagoula, Miss., shipyard about 125 miles away, Northrop said. Century City-based Northrop builds transport and amphibious assault ships at both locations. Consolidating ship construction on the Gulf Coast will reduce costs and increase efficiency, Wesley G. Bush, Northrop's chief executive, said in a statement.
WORLD
October 22, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
This shipyard is orphaned now, closed off from the world, storied old walls smeared with graffiti, cranes frozen over the Baltic tides. It is up for sale, but nobody offers to buy. The shipyards scattered along Poland's northern coast linger at the base of the country's view of itself. The labor union of shipbuilders and technicians first cracked, then slowly eroded, communism's grip on Poland and, by extension, the rest of Eastern Europe. Workers struck, organized and made demands; they stuck to their fight even in the face of bloody repression and martial law. Through everything that came later -- the rise from communism and reinvention through privatization, capitalism and European Union membership -- the shipyards remained a touchstone of Poland's national identity.
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