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NEWS
October 31, 1988 | United Press International
Solidarity sources reported Sunday that Poland's new industry minister has ordered the closure of the huge Lenin Shipyard, the birthplace of the now banned labor union. The shipyard director, reached by telephone Sunday night in Gdansk, would not directly confirm the order. "I have not agreed to it," said an obviously agitated Czeslaw Tolwinski, who has managed the plant for the last five years.
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WORLD
November 6, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Britain, once the world's mightiest seafaring power, announced Wednesday that it will shut down the last naval shipyard in England, eliminating nearly 1,000 jobs and closing a chapter of history stretching back hundreds of years. Workers in the southern city of Portsmouth have been building warships since the reign of King Henry VIII, including the famous Mary Rose. But citing dwindling demand, the government and defense contractor BAE Systems have agreed to cease construction there.
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NEWS
November 3, 1988 | United Press International
Rival Polish labor unions and management staged an unprecedented rally Wednesday in Gdansk, vowing to defy government closure of the Lenin Shipyard as British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher arrived for a visit that will include a trip to the troubled seaport. The banned Solidarity independent trade union, Communist-dominated unions and the director of the Lenin Shipyard joined 7,000 workers to condemn the government's plan to padlock Solidarity's birthplace on Dec. 1.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Carnival's cursed cruise ship Triumph broke loose from its moorings Wednesday when strong winds hit Mobile, Ala., and two shipyard workers fell into the Mobile River. One was still missing by evening.  Helicopters and search teams scoured the river for the employee of BAE Systems shipyard. The other one was rescued and hospitalized with mild hypothermia. The Triumph was at the shipyard undergoing repairs after a disastrous February cruise , when an engine fire knocked out power.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | Associated Press
Nine workers were injured Wednesday night, one of them critically, when a ship's propeller shaft fell on them at the National Steel & Shipbuilding Co., the site of an accident that killed six workers in July. One man was reported in critical condition at the UC San Diego Medical Center. The others suffered less serious injuries. Names of the victims was not released. Authorities at the shipyard refused to comment on the accident. A union spokesman said the union would investigate the accident.
WORLD
October 22, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
This shipyard is orphaned now, closed off from the world, storied old walls smeared with graffiti, cranes frozen over the Baltic tides. It is up for sale, but nobody offers to buy. The shipyards scattered along Poland's northern coast linger at the base of the country's view of itself. The labor union of shipbuilders and technicians first cracked, then slowly eroded, communism's grip on Poland and, by extension, the rest of Eastern Europe. Workers struck, organized and made demands; they stuck to their fight even in the face of bloody repression and martial law. Through everything that came later -- the rise from communism and reinvention through privatization, capitalism and European Union membership -- the shipyards remained a touchstone of Poland's national identity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
A submarine-hunting surveillance ship will be christened today in Washington state, the Navy announced Tuesday. The ceremonies for the surveillance ship Bold will be at the Tacoma Boatbuilding shipyards in Tacoma, with Sen. Slade Gorton (R-Wash.) making the main speech.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1986
A contract awarded to Southwest Marine Inc. will swell the company's San Diego work force by 500 over the next year. The $30.3-million contract to overhaul and upgrade the Spurance Class destroyer Fife is the largest single-ship contract awarded to the company, according to Southwest Marine president Art Engel. The contract, which will begin in September and stretch over 10 months, will bolster a local work force that had declined from 900 to 700 over the past few years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1987
What a feeling of sadness the announcement of the closing of Kaiser's steel plant brings! It is like watching a giant die of Alzheimer's disease. During World War II, Kaiser was a major factor in this country's victory over Japan. Plants and shipyards bloomed overnight all along the Pacific Coast, with particularly large ones on opposite sides of the Columbia River, in Portland, Ore., and Vancouver, Wash. So many workers had to be imported to run those plants that Kaiser built an entire little city, called "Vanport" for them.
TRAVEL
April 15, 2012 | By James Bartlett, Special to the Los Angeles Times
BELFAST, Northern Ireland - Everyone knows how the tale of the Titanic ends, but what of its beginning? The Titanic was born in Belfast, along with its sister Olympic-class ships, the Olympicand the Gigantic (later renamed the Britan¿nic). A new Titanic Belfast museum openedlast month, and there's also a year-long sched¿ule of events celebrating the Titanic's 100thanniversary that includes two exhibitions at the Ulster Folk & Transport Museum, on 170acres outside Belfast. As soon as you enter the "Designing Titanic" section, you're transported into the world of the Harland & Wolff shipyard: The sounds of crashing pipes, banging hammers and shouting workmen are heard throughout.
HEALTH
February 27, 2012 | By Bob Rosenblatt, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Workers swarmed through Henry J. Kaiser's Richmond, Calif., shipyard in World War II, building 747 ships for the Navy. The war "had siphoned off the most hardy specimens," a newspaper reported, so Kaiser was left with many workers too young, old or infirm to be drafted. The workers needed to be in good health to be effective on the job, and Kaiser offered them care from doctors in company clinics and at company hospitals. The workers paid 50 cents a week for the benefit. It was something new in industrial America - a bonus offered to attract scarce labor while wages were frozen during the war. The war ended, the workers quit the shipyards, leaving behind hospitals and doctors but no patients.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2011 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
At the West Coast's last major shipyard, the action never seems to stop. In one part of the Nassco yard, on the shores of San Diego Bay, the U.S. naval ship Medgar Evers is nearing completion. The 690-foot vessel is the 13th in a line of T-AKE ammunition and dry cargo ships built by Nassco for the Navy and is scheduled to roll into the ocean Oct. 29 wearing bunting and steamers to the blare of "Anchors Aweigh. " Next to it, No. 14 — this one called the Cesar Chavez — sits at a much earlier stage of construction.
OPINION
January 11, 2011 | Jim Newton
Amid the mountainous shipping containers that crowd the Port of Los Angeles, an emblematic battle is underway ? one that involves environmental protection, historic conservation, jobs, political turf and dirt. Lots and lots of dirt. FOR THE RECORD: Port: A Jan. 11 Op-Ed column about the Port of Los Angeles misspelled attorney Ben Reznik's name as Reznick.? The principal contestants in this faceoff are the staff of the Port of Los Angeles on one side and would-be shipbuilder Robert Stein on the other.
FOOD
July 29, 2010
  Shipyard Brewing Old Thumper Shipyard describes this as a nontraditional English bitter ale. It's closest to the extra special bitter, or ESB, style, which is bigger and hoppier than the usual English bitter. (Of course, neither is anywhere near as hoppy as a West Coast India pale ale, because nothing is.) One thing that might make Old Thumper nontraditional is the inclusion of some roasted malts, which gives a fleeting suggestion of a darker beer. Because Shipyard has been making this beer for more than 15 years, though, by American standards it is a tradition.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
With demand from the Navy for military ships declining, Northrop Grumman Corp. said Tuesday it was closing its Avondale, La., shipyard and may get out of the shipbuilding business altogether. The site near New Orleans employs about 5,000 people. Operations there will be consolidated with the company's Pascagoula, Miss., shipyard about 125 miles away, Northrop said. Century City-based Northrop builds transport and amphibious assault ships at both locations. Consolidating ship construction on the Gulf Coast will reduce costs and increase efficiency, Wesley G. Bush, Northrop's chief executive, said in a statement.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1985 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writer
Campbell Industries Inc., San Diego's second-largest shipyard, has been sold to an unidentified buyer who has agreed to keep the troubled ship-repair company open and operating. A spokesman for Campbell, a subsidiary of privately held Marine Construction Design Co. of Seattle, said the identity of the new owner will be revealed at a news conference this morning. The once-thriving tuna boat builder employed 1,300 workers as recently as 1981.
NEWS
August 20, 1987 | United Press International
The Soviet Union has taken a dramatic lead over the United States in the crucial field of submarine design, the 90th edition of Jane's Fighting Ships says. The Soviets already have at sea four classes of submarines superior to the most modern U.S. nuclear sub, said retired British navy Capt. John Moore, who for 15 years has edited Jane's, the basic reference book on the world's navies. Since the first U.S.
WORLD
October 22, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
This shipyard is orphaned now, closed off from the world, storied old walls smeared with graffiti, cranes frozen over the Baltic tides. It is up for sale, but nobody offers to buy. The shipyards scattered along Poland's northern coast linger at the base of the country's view of itself. The labor union of shipbuilders and technicians first cracked, then slowly eroded, communism's grip on Poland and, by extension, the rest of Eastern Europe. Workers struck, organized and made demands; they stuck to their fight even in the face of bloody repression and martial law. Through everything that came later -- the rise from communism and reinvention through privatization, capitalism and European Union membership -- the shipyards remained a touchstone of Poland's national identity.
NATIONAL
August 31, 2009 | Associated Press
The "Mighty Mo," the World War II battleship best known as the site of the formal surrender of Japan in 1945, is heading to the shipyard for repairs. The Missouri, now a decommissioned vessel called the Battleship Missouri Memorial, will leave its historic spot at Pearl Harbor's Battleship Row in October. The 65-year-old Missouri is in good shape, but rust is protruding from peeling paint and the deck is warped and bent. Its exterior is to be sanded down and repainted at the Pearl Harbor shipyard in a $15-million overhaul paid for by memorial reserve funds and a Defense Department grant.
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