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Shirin

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Robert Abele
The only possible reaction to an amateurish romance like "Shirin in Love" is: Do the filmmakers think we're all idiots? Practically every scene in this tale about a glamorous, unhappily engaged Los Angeles book reviewer (Nazanin Boniadi) with an eye for the handsome son (Riley Smith) of a reclusive novelist (Amy Madigan) is an abject filmmaking lesson in the many ways to irk moviegoers: cardboard characters, dippy plotting, sentimental overkill and tortuous logic. The thinly conceived Shirin is ostensibly meant to embody the kind of young, vivacious Iranian American member of the "Tehran-geles" community who finds it hard to balance cultural tradition with independence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Robert Abele
The only possible reaction to an amateurish romance like "Shirin in Love" is: Do the filmmakers think we're all idiots? Practically every scene in this tale about a glamorous, unhappily engaged Los Angeles book reviewer (Nazanin Boniadi) with an eye for the handsome son (Riley Smith) of a reclusive novelist (Amy Madigan) is an abject filmmaking lesson in the many ways to irk moviegoers: cardboard characters, dippy plotting, sentimental overkill and tortuous logic. The thinly conceived Shirin is ostensibly meant to embody the kind of young, vivacious Iranian American member of the "Tehran-geles" community who finds it hard to balance cultural tradition with independence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2006 | Lynn Heffley
Iranian-born visual artist Shirin Neshat was named Friday to receive the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize, one of the largest arts awards, in recognition of her explorations of Islam and gender relations. Neshat will receive a silver medallion and about $300,000 on Oct. 12 at the Hudson Theatre in New York City, where scenes from her feature film work will be screened.
WORLD
November 27, 2009 | By Alexandra Sandels
Iranian authorities have taken human rights lawyer Shirin Ebadi's Nobel Peace Prize medal and diploma from her safe-deposit box in Iran, Norwegian officials charged Thursday. Officials in Norway, which administers the prize, expressed outrage at the alleged seizure. "This is the first time a Nobel Peace Prize has been confiscated by national authorities," Norwegian Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Store said in a statement. "The medal and the diploma have been removed from Dr. Ebadi's bank box, together with other personal items.
WORLD
January 3, 2009 | Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi
Scores of young men gathered around the Tehran home-office of Iranian Nobel Peace Prize laureate Shirin Ebadi, shouted slogans against her and vandalized her home in the latest episode by hard-line political groups close to the government to intimidate the human rights lawyer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1999 | MAX JACOBSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shirin wants to be the king of West Valley Iranian restaurants, and it's a grand and handsome place, though I find the marble floor and pink granite tables a bit chilly. Literally chilly--I'd like to see someone stoke up the fireplace here. You start out with the usual Iranian basket of warm lavash bread and raw onion (yes, you're supposed to bite right in). The appetizers are amazing bargains, especially tah dig, the deliciously crusty rice from the bottom of the pilaf pot.
WORLD
November 27, 2009 | By Alexandra Sandels
Iranian authorities have taken human rights lawyer Shirin Ebadi's Nobel Peace Prize medal and diploma from her safe-deposit box in Iran, Norwegian officials charged Thursday. Officials in Norway, which administers the prize, expressed outrage at the alleged seizure. "This is the first time a Nobel Peace Prize has been confiscated by national authorities," Norwegian Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Store said in a statement. "The medal and the diploma have been removed from Dr. Ebadi's bank box, together with other personal items.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2005 | Tyler Green, Special to The Times
IN artist Shirin Neshat's newest film, "The Last Word," a man sits behind a long table, an ominous book in front of him. Identically attired men bring him more books, perhaps evidence of some kind. A woman sits across from the first man. She was beautiful once; she could be again. The man glares at her. "We've been keeping an eye on you.... I can make you regret being born." Tears well in the woman's eyes. "Do you know how much evidence we have against you?" he asks. The woman stares back.
WORLD
December 11, 2003 | From Associated Press
Iranian human rights activist Shirin Ebadi accepted her Nobel Peace Prize on Wednesday with a warning that civil liberties and human rights must not be allowed to fall prey to the "war on terrorism" launched in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks. Ebadi, the first Muslim woman and the first Iranian to win the award, said that even Western democracies have allowed their traditions of freedom and basic rights to be eroded. "Regulations restricting human rights and basic freedoms ...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2006 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Anyone who doubts ideas still have power should have seen Iranian human rights attorney Shirin Ebadi struggle to give a speech at UCLA this week. Barely 5 feet tall, the soft-spoken Ebadi was overshadowed by the lectern in the dark, cavernous Ackerman Ballroom when she stepped up to a resounding standing ovation from the 1,100-strong crowd, which seemed mostly Iranian American.
WORLD
January 3, 2009 | Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi
Scores of young men gathered around the Tehran home-office of Iranian Nobel Peace Prize laureate Shirin Ebadi, shouted slogans against her and vandalized her home in the latest episode by hard-line political groups close to the government to intimidate the human rights lawyer.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2006 | Lynn Heffley
Iranian-born visual artist Shirin Neshat was named Friday to receive the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize, one of the largest arts awards, in recognition of her explorations of Islam and gender relations. Neshat will receive a silver medallion and about $300,000 on Oct. 12 at the Hudson Theatre in New York City, where scenes from her feature film work will be screened.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2006 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Anyone who doubts ideas still have power should have seen Iranian human rights attorney Shirin Ebadi struggle to give a speech at UCLA this week. Barely 5 feet tall, the soft-spoken Ebadi was overshadowed by the lectern in the dark, cavernous Ackerman Ballroom when she stepped up to a resounding standing ovation from the 1,100-strong crowd, which seemed mostly Iranian American.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2005 | Tyler Green, Special to The Times
IN artist Shirin Neshat's newest film, "The Last Word," a man sits behind a long table, an ominous book in front of him. Identically attired men bring him more books, perhaps evidence of some kind. A woman sits across from the first man. She was beautiful once; she could be again. The man glares at her. "We've been keeping an eye on you.... I can make you regret being born." Tears well in the woman's eyes. "Do you know how much evidence we have against you?" he asks. The woman stares back.
HOME & GARDEN
December 16, 2004 | Lili Singer
What happens when 16 artists from the U.S. and Europe are invited to express the garden in photography? An extraordinary traveling exhibition collected into this massive catalog that is, itself, a work of fine art. There are otherworldly alliums, austere allees, narrow branches bursting with buds and flowers that dissolve into saturated color -- landscapes and plants made theatrical, hallucinatory, edgy and more beautiful by the camera and the artist's imagination and technique.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2004 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Nobel Prize-winning Iranian human rights attorney Shirin Ebadi has an unusual reply to those who invoke Islam to support authoritarian societies and the stifling of liberty for women. Islam, Ebadi says, is being wrongly used by male-dominated Muslim states and movements to justify discriminating against women when, in fact, the practice "has its roots in patriarchal and male-dominated culture prevailing in these societies, not in Islam."
HOME & GARDEN
December 16, 2004 | Lili Singer
What happens when 16 artists from the U.S. and Europe are invited to express the garden in photography? An extraordinary traveling exhibition collected into this massive catalog that is, itself, a work of fine art. There are otherworldly alliums, austere allees, narrow branches bursting with buds and flowers that dissolve into saturated color -- landscapes and plants made theatrical, hallucinatory, edgy and more beautiful by the camera and the artist's imagination and technique.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2004 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Nobel Prize-winning Iranian human rights attorney Shirin Ebadi has an unusual reply to those who invoke Islam to support authoritarian societies and the stifling of liberty for women. Islam, Ebadi says, is being wrongly used by male-dominated Muslim states and movements to justify discriminating against women when, in fact, the practice "has its roots in patriarchal and male-dominated culture prevailing in these societies, not in Islam."
WORLD
December 11, 2003 | From Associated Press
Iranian human rights activist Shirin Ebadi accepted her Nobel Peace Prize on Wednesday with a warning that civil liberties and human rights must not be allowed to fall prey to the "war on terrorism" launched in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks. Ebadi, the first Muslim woman and the first Iranian to win the award, said that even Western democracies have allowed their traditions of freedom and basic rights to be eroded. "Regulations restricting human rights and basic freedoms ...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1999 | MAX JACOBSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shirin wants to be the king of West Valley Iranian restaurants, and it's a grand and handsome place, though I find the marble floor and pink granite tables a bit chilly. Literally chilly--I'd like to see someone stoke up the fireplace here. You start out with the usual Iranian basket of warm lavash bread and raw onion (yes, you're supposed to bite right in). The appetizers are amazing bargains, especially tah dig, the deliciously crusty rice from the bottom of the pilaf pot.
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