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Shirin Ebadi

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WORLD
January 3, 2009 | Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi
Scores of young men gathered around the Tehran home-office of Iranian Nobel Peace Prize laureate Shirin Ebadi, shouted slogans against her and vandalized her home in the latest episode by hard-line political groups close to the government to intimidate the human rights lawyer.
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OPINION
June 10, 2010 | Timothy Garton Ash
Do not forget Iran. Remember Neda. If there are green-clad protests in Tehran this weekend — to mark the first anniversary of the election that President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad stole — they will doubtless again be crushed with casual brutality by the thugs of the Basij militia, the secret police and the Revolutionary Guard. Faced with violent repression, the green movement is a long way down — but not out. Iran will never again be the country it was before the election of June 12, 2009.
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WORLD
January 14, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Shirin Ebadi, the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize winner, said she had been ordered to appear before Iran's Revolutionary Court or face arrest. Ebadi, a human rights lawyer who has riled religious hard-liners by defending political dissidents, said she was not informed of any charge against her. Ebadi, 57, the first Muslim woman and first Iranian to win the peace prize, said she had not decided when she would appear.
WORLD
November 27, 2009 | By Alexandra Sandels
Iranian authorities have taken human rights lawyer Shirin Ebadi's Nobel Peace Prize medal and diploma from her safe-deposit box in Iran, Norwegian officials charged Thursday. Officials in Norway, which administers the prize, expressed outrage at the alleged seizure. "This is the first time a Nobel Peace Prize has been confiscated by national authorities," Norwegian Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Store said in a statement. "The medal and the diploma have been removed from Dr. Ebadi's bank box, together with other personal items.
WORLD
October 15, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
About 3,000 Iranians welcomed home Nobel Peace Prize winner Shirin Ebadi at Tehran's Mehrabad Airport. The crowd clapped, linked arms and sang popular anthems dating from before the 1979 Islamic Revolution. "This award means that the Iranian nation's desires for human rights and democracy and peace have been heard by the world," Ebadi told the crowd, brushing tears from her face.
OPINION
October 14, 2003
Re "Iranian Jurist Wins Nobel Peace Prize," Oct. 11: Cyrus the Great is credited for writing the first charter of human rights in history. After more than 2,500 years, one of Cyrus' descendants is acknowledged for her tireless fights to preserve these rights, especially for women, in Iran, the land where Cyrus' charter was written. Kudos to the Nobel Peace Prize committee for its wise selection of lawyer Shirin Ebadi for her years of intellectual struggle against the barbaric regime of the mullahs in Iran.
WORLD
January 16, 2005 | From Associated Press
Nobel Peace laureate Shirin Ebadi has told Iran's hard-line Revolutionary Court on Saturday that she will not obey a summons to appear, even if it means her arrest. The decision by Ebadi, the first Iranian and the first Muslim woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize, marks an open challenge to a powerful body that has convicted many political activists, intellectuals and writers on vague charges of endangering national security and discrediting the ruling Islamic establishment.
WORLD
October 12, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
Iran's first Nobel Peace Prize, awarded to human rights lawyer Shirin Ebadi, has exposed the battle lines between the nation's conservatives and reformists, who exchanged fire in Saturday's newspapers. Iran's conservatives accused the Nobel committee of pandering to the West's political agenda by awarding its Peace Prize to Ebadi, while reformists hailed her as a catalyst for change. Ebadi, 56, is a thorn in the side of hard-liners and a vocal campaigner on behalf of women's rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2008 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
Iran's leading feminist and Nobel Peace Prize laureate said Saturday that a military confrontation between the United States and Iran over nuclear issues would strike a disastrous blow to her nation's struggling human rights movement by strengthening the hard-line Islamic regime. Shirin Ebadi, in interviews between sessions at a Los Angeles youth peace conference, called on the Iranian government to abandon uranium enrichment, which has fueled fears that the country is developing a nuclear bomb.
OPINION
June 10, 2010 | Timothy Garton Ash
Do not forget Iran. Remember Neda. If there are green-clad protests in Tehran this weekend — to mark the first anniversary of the election that President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad stole — they will doubtless again be crushed with casual brutality by the thugs of the Basij militia, the secret police and the Revolutionary Guard. Faced with violent repression, the green movement is a long way down — but not out. Iran will never again be the country it was before the election of June 12, 2009.
WORLD
January 3, 2009 | Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi
Scores of young men gathered around the Tehran home-office of Iranian Nobel Peace Prize laureate Shirin Ebadi, shouted slogans against her and vandalized her home in the latest episode by hard-line political groups close to the government to intimidate the human rights lawyer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2008 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
Iran's leading feminist and Nobel Peace Prize laureate said Saturday that a military confrontation between the United States and Iran over nuclear issues would strike a disastrous blow to her nation's struggling human rights movement by strengthening the hard-line Islamic regime. Shirin Ebadi, in interviews between sessions at a Los Angeles youth peace conference, called on the Iranian government to abandon uranium enrichment, which has fueled fears that the country is developing a nuclear bomb.
WORLD
November 27, 2007 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Tehran The night before lawyer Mohammed Dadkhah was to appear in court for his first human rights case, two masked men on motorcycles pulled up alongside him as he walked home. They hurled him into one of Tehran's ubiquitous street-side drainage canals. They grabbed at the briefcase filled with papers for the next day's defense. Dadkhah refused to let go. They punched and kicked him. They ripped off a piece of the briefcase and roared away into the night. Panting in fear, his face scraped raw, his clothes soaking wet, Dadkhah pulled himself out of the gutter and brushed himself off. When he got home, he caught his breath and considered his options.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2006 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Anyone who doubts ideas still have power should have seen Iranian human rights attorney Shirin Ebadi struggle to give a speech at UCLA this week. Barely 5 feet tall, the soft-spoken Ebadi was overshadowed by the lectern in the dark, cavernous Ackerman Ballroom when she stepped up to a resounding standing ovation from the 1,100-strong crowd, which seemed mostly Iranian American.
WORLD
January 16, 2005 | From Associated Press
Nobel Peace laureate Shirin Ebadi has told Iran's hard-line Revolutionary Court on Saturday that she will not obey a summons to appear, even if it means her arrest. The decision by Ebadi, the first Iranian and the first Muslim woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize, marks an open challenge to a powerful body that has convicted many political activists, intellectuals and writers on vague charges of endangering national security and discrediting the ruling Islamic establishment.
WORLD
January 14, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Shirin Ebadi, the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize winner, said she had been ordered to appear before Iran's Revolutionary Court or face arrest. Ebadi, a human rights lawyer who has riled religious hard-liners by defending political dissidents, said she was not informed of any charge against her. Ebadi, 57, the first Muslim woman and first Iranian to win the peace prize, said she had not decided when she would appear.
WORLD
October 11, 2003 | Azadeh Moaveni and Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writers
Iranian jurist and activist Shirin Ebadi was awarded the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for her long fight for human rights in her native land, becoming the first Iranian and the first Muslim woman to win the honor. Ebadi has battled Iran's hard-line Islamic rulers on behalf of women, children and pro-democracy students but remains a practicing Muslim who insists that Islam and democracy are fully compatible.
WORLD
November 27, 2007 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Tehran The night before lawyer Mohammed Dadkhah was to appear in court for his first human rights case, two masked men on motorcycles pulled up alongside him as he walked home. They hurled him into one of Tehran's ubiquitous street-side drainage canals. They grabbed at the briefcase filled with papers for the next day's defense. Dadkhah refused to let go. They punched and kicked him. They ripped off a piece of the briefcase and roared away into the night. Panting in fear, his face scraped raw, his clothes soaking wet, Dadkhah pulled himself out of the gutter and brushed himself off. When he got home, he caught his breath and considered his options.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2004 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Nobel Prize-winning Iranian human rights attorney Shirin Ebadi has an unusual reply to those who invoke Islam to support authoritarian societies and the stifling of liberty for women. Islam, Ebadi says, is being wrongly used by male-dominated Muslim states and movements to justify discriminating against women when, in fact, the practice "has its roots in patriarchal and male-dominated culture prevailing in these societies, not in Islam."
WORLD
December 11, 2003 | From Associated Press
Iranian human rights activist Shirin Ebadi accepted her Nobel Peace Prize on Wednesday with a warning that civil liberties and human rights must not be allowed to fall prey to the "war on terrorism" launched in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks. Ebadi, the first Muslim woman and the first Iranian to win the award, said that even Western democracies have allowed their traditions of freedom and basic rights to be eroded. "Regulations restricting human rights and basic freedoms ...
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