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Shirin Neshat

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September 16, 2006 | Lynn Heffley
Iranian-born visual artist Shirin Neshat was named Friday to receive the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize, one of the largest arts awards, in recognition of her explorations of Islam and gender relations. Neshat will receive a silver medallion and about $300,000 on Oct. 12 at the Hudson Theatre in New York City, where scenes from her feature film work will be screened.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2006 | Lynn Heffley
Iranian-born visual artist Shirin Neshat was named Friday to receive the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize, one of the largest arts awards, in recognition of her explorations of Islam and gender relations. Neshat will receive a silver medallion and about $300,000 on Oct. 12 at the Hudson Theatre in New York City, where scenes from her feature film work will be screened.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2005 | Tyler Green, Special to The Times
IN artist Shirin Neshat's newest film, "The Last Word," a man sits behind a long table, an ominous book in front of him. Identically attired men bring him more books, perhaps evidence of some kind. A woman sits across from the first man. She was beautiful once; she could be again. The man glares at her. "We've been keeping an eye on you.... I can make you regret being born." Tears well in the woman's eyes. "Do you know how much evidence we have against you?" he asks. The woman stares back.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2005 | Tyler Green, Special to The Times
IN artist Shirin Neshat's newest film, "The Last Word," a man sits behind a long table, an ominous book in front of him. Identically attired men bring him more books, perhaps evidence of some kind. A woman sits across from the first man. She was beautiful once; she could be again. The man glares at her. "We've been keeping an eye on you.... I can make you regret being born." Tears well in the woman's eyes. "Do you know how much evidence we have against you?" he asks. The woman stares back.
HOME & GARDEN
December 16, 2004 | Lili Singer
What happens when 16 artists from the U.S. and Europe are invited to express the garden in photography? An extraordinary traveling exhibition collected into this massive catalog that is, itself, a work of fine art. There are otherworldly alliums, austere allees, narrow branches bursting with buds and flowers that dissolve into saturated color -- landscapes and plants made theatrical, hallucinatory, edgy and more beautiful by the camera and the artist's imagination and technique.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By David Ng
The big Jeff Koons retrospective that originally had been slated to debut at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles in January isn't expected to arrive in town until 2015, but fans of the contemporary artist have an opportunity to sate their Koons craving sooner rather later. Koons is set to participate in a public talk Feb. 24 with filmmaker John Waters at the Orpheum Theatre in downtown L.A. The talk will be part of the Broad's The Un-Private Collection series in association with the Library Foundation of Los Angeles's ALOUD series.  PHOTOS: Arts and culture in pictures by The Times Eli Broad has a number of Koons' works in his private collection, some of which will be on display in the inaugural exhibition of The Broad museum, which is expected to open to the public in late 2014.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
For the 2013 Sundance Film Festival, which kicks off Jan. 17, organizers have tapped fashion and interior designer Todd Oldham to create a line of limited-edition merchandise including apparel, accessories and and an art book. Oldham , who won the CFDA's Perry Ellis Award for emerging talent in 1991 and has worked with an impressive list of brands in the decades since, including the likes of Escada, Old Navy, Target and La-Z-Boy, is apparently a longtime festival fan, telling the Inside Sundance Institute magazine that he used to attend it, with his mother, as a kind of "art holiday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1994 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
In many ways modern art is the language of the misunderstood. In the beginning it was spoken by visionary bohemians and beats within this culture. Today, that language embraces and is embraced by immigrants, exiles and refugees sea-tossed to these shores by a world off its axis.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2001 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
It was an encounter with cinema 35 years ago that caused Philip Glass to develop the style that has made him famous. As a music student in Paris, he collaborated with Ravi Shankar on a score for "Chappaqua," a psychedelic underground film, and that first exposure to the Indian music inspired what became his reductive, Minimalist approach to composition.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Here's Eli and Edythe Broad's advice to budding, young art collectors: take your time, do the research, don't rush to buy. “You got to invest time, it's not just about money,” Eli Broad said this week at a talk for the Los Angeles Public Library's ALOUD series . “It's about meeting new artists -- at MFA shows, at universities -- and it's about getting all the publications and going to museums.” “Spend time looking, go to galleries,...
HOME & GARDEN
December 16, 2004 | Lili Singer
What happens when 16 artists from the U.S. and Europe are invited to express the garden in photography? An extraordinary traveling exhibition collected into this massive catalog that is, itself, a work of fine art. There are otherworldly alliums, austere allees, narrow branches bursting with buds and flowers that dissolve into saturated color -- landscapes and plants made theatrical, hallucinatory, edgy and more beautiful by the camera and the artist's imagination and technique.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2005 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
Sussan Deyhim and Maya Beiser are striking, powerful presences. One is an exceptional Iranian vocalist. The other, an exceptional Israeli cellist. They have a lot in common, but politics and geography had kept them apart until UCLA Live invited them to Royce Hall on Saturday night. That is to say, the politics and geography of the insular New York new music scene kept them apart. The Middle East seems to have had little to do with the situation.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2000 | SHAUNA SNOW
POP/ROCK She Didn't Want to Steal Arista's Thunder: In the latest episode of the Whitney Houston chronicles, TV Guide is reporting that the singer has backed out of a concert special that was to have been televised during the May ratings sweeps. But a CBS spokeswoman said the report "jumped the gun a bit. We were just in talks. It was never set in stone. We'd love to work with [Houston], but it just didn't work out."
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