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TRAVEL
August 27, 2006
THESE men from the Kuna tribe on the San Blas Islands of Panama entertained passengers from the small Pacific Explorer cruise ship, including Shirley and Robert Gapper, of West Covina. Shirley took this shot with her Canon G2. "I liked it because of the brilliant color of those yellow shirts," said the retired music teacher, adding that the performance was "so synchronized, it was almost unreal."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
“Mad Men” is almost always more successful when it approaches Important Social Issues obliquely rather than head-on. Last year's “The Flood” was widely panned for its awkward and heavy-handed depiction of Martin Luther's King's assassination and its aftermath. In contrast, “A Day's Work” may be the smartest, most sensitive this show has ever been on the subject of race, mostly because on the surface it's not about race at all, but rather an almost farcical chain of events set off by a bouquet of flowers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1987
The play "Kvetch" is about people who become so obsessed with life's minor annoyances that they cannot cope with larger realities. The same can be said of Shirley's review. In a review that was eight paragraphs long, Shirley chose to write about his seat location for five of those paragraphs. Five. As "Donna," I am grateful for the compliment of being described as "wonderfully tortured" in the review. But I feel a bit more space could have been devoted to a critique of a production that has been running for 15 months, rather than Shirley's own personal crabbiness concerning his seat.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Susan King
The curtain goes up Thursday on the fifth TCM Classic Film Festival with the world premiere of the restoration of Fred Zinnemann's 1955 "Oklahoma!," based on the landmark Rodgers and Hammerstein musical. Shirley Jones, who made her film debut in the hit, will be on hand at the TCL Chinese Theatre Imax to discuss the film with Robert Osborne, Turner Classic Movies' popular host. Over the next four days, rabid movie fans will descend on Hollywood to watch beloved classic films and see some of Tinseltown's most venerable stars, including Jerry Lewis, who will have a hand and footprint ceremony outside the Chinese and appear at the screening of 1963's "The Nutty Professor"; Kim Novak, who will appear at the screening of 1958's "Bell, Book and Candle"; Maureen O'Hara, who will be the special guest at the presentation of the 1941 Oscar-winning best film "How Green Was My Valley"; and Mel Brooks, who will be cracking wise at the 40th anniversary celebration of "Blazing Saddles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Writer-director P.J. Hogan may have based "Mental" on an actual incident from his childhood, but the crazy quilt of a movie that resulted feels anything but real. This strained, shrill effort, set in small-town Australia, revolves around the über-quirky Moochmore clan: "Sound of Music"-obsessed mother Shirley (Rebecca Gibney), absentee dad - and local mayor - Barry (Anthony LaPaglia) and their five off-kilter daughters. When Shirley has a colorful nervous breakdown, Barry sticks her in a mental hospital, then randomly hires screwy, knife-wielding hitchhiker Shaz (Hogan's "Muriel's Wedding" star Toni Collette)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1992
Graveside services are pending for longtime Santa Paula schoolteacher David Bryce Kellogg, 57, of Ventura. Kellogg was diagnosed with cancer in 1989 and died of the disease at home Saturday, said his wife, Shirley. In the course of his 20-year career with the Santa Paula Elementary School District, Kellogg taught more than 500 students. He had been a teacher since 1970 and was a member of the California Teacher's Assn. Besides his wife, Kellogg is survived by two children.
SPORTS
March 16, 1995 | MAL FLORENCE
According to Kevin Sherrington of the Dallas Morning News, Dennis Rodman's mother, Shirley, never worried that Madonna would end up as her daughter-in-law. In their only conversation about Madonna, Shirley asked: "Dennis, why would you go out with that woman?" Replied Rodman: "She has $250 million, Mama." * Trivia time: Which American Basketball Assn. franchise folded in 1975-76 after playing only 11 games?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
“Mad Men” is almost always more successful when it approaches Important Social Issues obliquely rather than head-on. Last year's “The Flood” was widely panned for its awkward and heavy-handed depiction of Martin Luther's King's assassination and its aftermath. In contrast, “A Day's Work” may be the smartest, most sensitive this show has ever been on the subject of race, mostly because on the surface it's not about race at all, but rather an almost farcical chain of events set off by a bouquet of flowers.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just another tragedy in family court. A young crack mother, desperate to conceal her pregnancy, had locked herself in a tenement bathroom and given birth to a three-pound boy. As she pushed, he fell to the floor and broke his skull. The mother abandoned him, like she had two previous babies. All were born addicted to crack. "Can we do anything about this woman?" asks Judge Judith Sheindlin, her voice taut with anger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1992 | PSYCHE PASCUAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was lethal conversation, laced with talk of painkillers and suffocation by plastic bag. But for Derek Humphry, co-founder of the Hemlock Society and best-selling author of a manual on suicide, telling others how to die is a way of life. On Saturday, the 61-year-old Eugene, Ore., author described how, in 1975, he assisted in the suicide of his first wife, Jean, who was suffering from terminal cancer.
OPINION
February 14, 2014
Re "Child star, diplomat," Obituary, Feb. 12 Shirley Temple Black, who died Monday, had a wonderful sense of humor. When she ran for Congress in a special election in 1967, she had her headquarters on Ventura Boulevard in Sherman Oaks, with a sign in the window that said, "Vote for me or I will hold my breathe until I turn blue. " I remember laughing out loud when I saw that sign. Robert Berliner Sherman Oaks ALSO: Letters: No executions -- for now Letters: Mammograms, yes or no?
OPINION
February 13, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
As an adult, Shirley Temple Black shed her signature ringlets, became a Republican fundraiser and went on to a career as a respected diplomat in the Nixon, Ford and George H.W. Bush administrations. Even her boss, Henry Kissinger, was impressed, calling her "very intelligent, very tough-minded, very disciplined. " But not all fundraisers are as able as Black, who died Monday. Consider George James Tsunis, who has been nominated by President Obama as ambassador to Norway, and Colleen Bell, Obama's pick to be ambassador to Hungary.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Christy Khoshaba
Shirley Temple Black, the dimpled curly-haired scene-stealer, warmed hearts from the start. She died this week at age 85 at her home near San Francisco, and though Temple Black went on to lead a storied life well outside Hollywood, there are still a few facts that some readers may not know. Here's a sampling: Watch out Hollywood, I'm here: At 3, Temple made her on-screen debut, but it was a strange one. She and a handful of other toddlers starred in the 1932 parody series “Baby Burlesks.” The toddlers wore diapers and barely there lingerie, playing hookers and World War I soldiers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - - By the late 1980s, Depression-era child actress Shirley Temple Black had been retired from Hollywood for some 40 years and was nearing the end of her second career as a U.S. diplomat. But in China, her star was enjoying an improbable -- and meteoric -- rise.   After decades of isolation from the West, China had begun to open up, and on Sunday nights, families were tuning into state-run television for two special programs featuring foreign films: “Upright Theater” and “Translated Movies for TV.” Programmers, though, insisted on family-friendly fare, sans anything scandalous or political.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik and Amy Kaufman
By singing and dancing into the hearts of Depression-era America, Shirley Temple opened the door for hundreds of childhood performers to follow. Yet the realm of stardom in which those young stars now find themselves couldn't be more different than the world Temple helped create. Shirley Temple Black, who died Monday at age 85, performed in dozens of movies before she even hit her teens. For several years in the 1930s she was a bigger box-office draw than any adult star of the period, a group that included Vivien Leigh and Greta Garbo, as the studio both pushed Temple to crank out movies and protected her from the scrutiny that came with it.  PHOTOS: Shirley Temple Black, 1928-2014 It is Temple's legacy that, directly or otherwise, made possible the emergence of a wide group of modern-era youthful entertainers, including Jodie Foster, Justin Bieber, Gary Coleman and Miley Cyrus, to name just a few. It is also a culture that has mutated significantly in Temple's wake - and not always for the best.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Former child star and later U.S. ambassador Shirley Temple Black died Monday at age 85. TCM plans to air a marathon of her most popular films on March 9. The marathon, which begins at 1:30 p.m. PST, begins with "Heidi," her 1937 film based on the Swiss children's story. Other films in the lineup include "Stowaway" and "Bright Eyes," the 1934 film that featured her singing "On the Good Ship Lollipop" and paved the way for Shirley Temple Development to be set up at 20th Century Fox. PHOTOS: Shirley Temple Black, 1928-2014 "The Little Princess," "I'll Be Seeing You," "A Kiss for Corliss" and "That Hagen Girl" will also be part of the marathon.
REAL ESTATE
November 28, 2004 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell have purchased a Pacific Palisades home for close to its asking price of $4.5 million, according to public records. The actors bought a gated, traditional-style estate with five bedrooms and 5 1/2 bathrooms in about 6,000 square feet.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | PETER BENNETT, Bennett is a Southland free-lance writer.
This weekend, load the trunk with a rock hammer, chisels, a pick and shovel and all the water you can carry. Your destination is Opal Canyon, the Mojave Desert home of two opal mines that allow visitors to hunt and keep the fabled semiprecious stones. The Kern County mines are the only known sources of gem-fire opals in California, and one of only three recognized opal fields in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | Valerie J. Nelson
Shirley Temple Black, who as the most popular child movie star of all time lifted a filmgoing nation's spirits during the Depression and then grew up to be a diplomat, has died. She was 85. Black died late Monday at her home in Woodside, Calif., according to publicist Cheryl J. Kagan. No cause was given. From 1935 through 1938, the curly-haired moppet billed as Shirley Temple was the top box-office draw in the nation. She saved what became 20th Century Fox studios from bankruptcy and made more than 40 movies before she turned 12. PHOTOS: Shirley Temple Black Hollywood recognized the enchanting, dimpled scene-stealer's importance to the industry with a “special award” -- a miniature Oscar -- at the Academy Awards for 1934, the year she sang and danced her way into America's collective heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2014 | By Susan King
News of Shirley Temple Black's death Monday night brought back wonderful memories for me, of my childhood and my early love of Hollywood. Shirley Temple was one of my early obsessions. From the age of 5, I would watch and watch her movies from "Bright Eyes" to "Poor Little Rich Girl" to my favorite "The Little Princess. " My mother was my Temple enabler so to speak. She had turned on the television one Saturday afternoon when we were living in Miami to "Shirley Temple Theater," a weekly showcase of her classic films.
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