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Shirley Booth

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NEWS
October 21, 1992 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shirley Booth, whose dramatic triumphs ranged from the tortured wife in the poignant "Come Back, Little Sheba," to the pleasantly arrogant Hazel in the 1960s television series of the same name, has died at her home in Chatham, Mass. A spokesman for Nickerson Funeral Homes in nearby Orleans said Tuesday that Miss Booth--a Tony, Emmy and Academy award winner--was 94 when she died Friday. She had been inactive for many years and was living quietly in the Cape Cod village.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1992 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shirley Booth, who died this week at the age of 94, will be most widely remembered for her television work, a lot of which I missed because I was out of the country or otherwise distracted. But no one who saw and heard her on stage or in the film, pathetically calling in the gathering darkness for her little dog in "Come Back, Little Sheba," will have any doubt that she was one of the great and versatile character actresses of her time. She was Everywoman to whoever was playing Everyman.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1992 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shirley Booth, who died this week at the age of 94, will be most widely remembered for her television work, a lot of which I missed because I was out of the country or otherwise distracted. But no one who saw and heard her on stage or in the film, pathetically calling in the gathering darkness for her little dog in "Come Back, Little Sheba," will have any doubt that she was one of the great and versatile character actresses of her time. She was Everywoman to whoever was playing Everyman.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
"Come Back, Little Sheba" at the Los Angeles Theatre Center feels like a 1950 Chevrolet being driven around the block for the first time in years. It handles very well, but there's a reluctance to open 'er up. William Inge's play briefly roared to life on Friday night when Doc (Charles Hallahan) came home plastered and took a good look at the woman he had been hitched to for 20 years (Tyne Daly).
NEWS
August 26, 1994
Nomi Mitty, 54, Broadway actress who went on to films and television series. She began her career on Broadway as a child actress in Shirley Booth's "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" for which she won the Outer Circle Critics Award for best supporting performance. Her feature films included "Serpico" and "Melvin and Howard." An expert poker player, Ms. Mitty doubled for Elizabeth Taylor's hands in "Poker Alice."
NEWS
August 16, 2007 | From the Associated Press
S. Epatha Merkerson, who starred in a revival of William Inge's "Come Back, Little Sheba" at the Kirk Douglas Theatre in Culver City earlier this summer, is taking the role to Broadway. Merkerson will star as Lola, a blowzy, lonely housewife, in the drama that opens Jan. 24, the Manhattan Theatre Club announced Wednesday. It will be the play's first Broadway revival. The original 1950 production starred Shirley Booth. Merkerson is best known for her 13 seasons as Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2002 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whitney Blake, the versatile actress who portrayed comedian Shirley Booth's housewife-employer in the long-running television series "Hazel" and co-created the edgier sitcom "One Day at a Time," has died. She was 76. Blake died Saturday at her home in Edgartown, Mass., after a long illness, attended by her family and the Hospice of Martha's Vineyard, said her husband, writer-producer Allan Manings.
NEWS
December 21, 1995
William Marchant, 72, best known for his hit Broadway comedy "The Desk Set." The 1955 play, starring Shirley Booth as a librarian threatened by an efficiency expert attempting to introduce computers, was made into a film in 1957 starring Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy. Marchant wrote frequently about his friendship with Noel Coward, including a memoir, "Noel Coward Remembered."
NEWS
October 21, 1992 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shirley Booth, whose dramatic triumphs ranged from the tortured wife in the poignant "Come Back, Little Sheba," to the pleasantly arrogant Hazel in the 1960s television series of the same name, has died at her home in Chatham, Mass. A spokesman for Nickerson Funeral Homes in nearby Orleans said Tuesday that Miss Booth--a Tony, Emmy and Academy award winner--was 94 when she died Friday. She had been inactive for many years and was living quietly in the Cape Cod village.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
"Come Back, Little Sheba" at the Los Angeles Theatre Center feels like a 1950 Chevrolet being driven around the block for the first time in years. It handles very well, but there's a reluctance to open 'er up. William Inge's play briefly roared to life on Friday night when Doc (Charles Hallahan) came home plastered and took a good look at the woman he had been hitched to for 20 years (Tyne Daly).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Peggy Chantler Dick, 78, writer of such television shows as "Dennis the Menace" and "The Courtship of Eddie's Father," died Nov. 20 of cardiac failure at St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica. The native of Philadelphia graduated from Northwestern University and then interned with the writing team of the "Edgar Bergen Radio Comedy Hour." She worked into production for the Norman Lear Co.
NEWS
January 11, 1996
Johnny Johnston, 80, radio host, actor and singer whose recording of "Laura" sold more than 1 million copies. Born in Missouri in 1915, Johnston first gained fame as a junior pocket billiards champion at the age of 16. A big-band singer in the 1930s, he appeared with Art Kassel and His Castles and sang on "The Breakfast Club."
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