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Shirley Chisholm

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2005 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Shirley Chisholm, the first black woman elected to Congress and the first African American to seek a major party nomination for president, has died. She was 80. Chisholm died Saturday night at her home in Osmond Beach, Fla. The cause of death was not immediately known, but she had been in failing health for some time. "She was an activist ... and a woman of great courage," the Rev. Jesse Jackson said in a statement Monday that was posted on the Operation PUSH website.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Documentarian Shola Lynch first encountered controversial political activist and professor Angela Davis over 20 years ago while still a student at the University of Texas in Austin. Davis delivered a speech that "was all about justice and race, fighting the good fight," recalled Lynch, now 44, on the phone from her home in New York. "In college, that is what we were all about. That was the time we were trying to figure it out. What did equality mean? What does it mean to be black?
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NEWS
October 14, 1993 | Associated Press
Former Rep. Shirley Chisholm (D-N.Y.) said that she no longer is a candidate for ambassador to Jamaica because of a progressive eye disorder, the White House announced Wednesday.
OPINION
January 7, 2005 | Donna C. Schuele, Donna C. Schuele is a research scholar at the UCLA Center for the Study of Women and teaches history and political science at UCLA and USC.
Nearly 30 years ago I embarked on my college career by choosing a major in history, taking an experimental freshman course in the biographies of 20th century world political leaders. Women were not ignored: We studied Golda Meir, Indira Gandhi, Madame Chiang Kai-shek. If nothing else I learned that, at least outside the United States, women could hold and exercise vast political power.
NEWS
April 14, 1986
Feminist and civil rights activist Shirley Chisholm urged women to stop being "complacent, passive armchair recipients" and start planning for their senior years. Chisholm told an audience in Manchester, N.H., at the first New England Women's Conference on Aging, that elderly women are becoming "a new minority group with very special needs." "Many are widowed. They are living alone," said the former New York congresswoman. "Who is going to give them a job at age 60?"
NATIONAL
January 3, 2005 | From Associated Press
Shirley Chisholm, the first black woman elected to Congress and an outspoken advocate for women and minorities during seven terms in the House, died Saturday near Daytona Beach, Fla., friends said. She was 80. "She was our Moses that opened the Red Sea for us," Robert E. Williams, president of the NAACP in Flagler County, Fla., told Associated Press late Sunday. He did not have the details of her death.
OPINION
January 7, 2005 | Donna C. Schuele, Donna C. Schuele is a research scholar at the UCLA Center for the Study of Women and teaches history and political science at UCLA and USC.
Nearly 30 years ago I embarked on my college career by choosing a major in history, taking an experimental freshman course in the biographies of 20th century world political leaders. Women were not ignored: We studied Golda Meir, Indira Gandhi, Madame Chiang Kai-shek. If nothing else I learned that, at least outside the United States, women could hold and exercise vast political power.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Documentarian Shola Lynch first encountered controversial political activist and professor Angela Davis over 20 years ago while still a student at the University of Texas in Austin. Davis delivered a speech that "was all about justice and race, fighting the good fight," recalled Lynch, now 44, on the phone from her home in New York. "In college, that is what we were all about. That was the time we were trying to figure it out. What did equality mean? What does it mean to be black?
NEWS
April 15, 1985 | LYNN SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Why couldn't American women unite to deliver a "woman's vote" last year for Geraldine Ferraro? Because there is no such thing--at least not yet, said politician-turned-educator Shirley Chisholm on Saturday during her keynote speech before the University of California Women's Leadership Conference at UC Irvine.
NEWS
June 27, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Former Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm told delegates of the National Organization for Women Sunday that 1988 is the year women have "their greatest opportunity yet" to exercise power in national politics. Voting trends indicate that women may outvote men by 10 million ballots in the November election, Chisholm told delegates during the final day of NOW's 21st annual conference, which opened Friday at the Buffalo Convention Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2005 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Shirley Chisholm, the first black woman elected to Congress and the first African American to seek a major party nomination for president, has died. She was 80. Chisholm died Saturday night at her home in Osmond Beach, Fla. The cause of death was not immediately known, but she had been in failing health for some time. "She was an activist ... and a woman of great courage," the Rev. Jesse Jackson said in a statement Monday that was posted on the Operation PUSH website.
NATIONAL
January 3, 2005 | From Associated Press
Shirley Chisholm, the first black woman elected to Congress and an outspoken advocate for women and minorities during seven terms in the House, died Saturday near Daytona Beach, Fla., friends said. She was 80. "She was our Moses that opened the Red Sea for us," Robert E. Williams, president of the NAACP in Flagler County, Fla., told Associated Press late Sunday. He did not have the details of her death.
NEWS
October 14, 1993 | Associated Press
Former Rep. Shirley Chisholm (D-N.Y.) said that she no longer is a candidate for ambassador to Jamaica because of a progressive eye disorder, the White House announced Wednesday.
NEWS
June 27, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Former Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm told delegates of the National Organization for Women Sunday that 1988 is the year women have "their greatest opportunity yet" to exercise power in national politics. Voting trends indicate that women may outvote men by 10 million ballots in the November election, Chisholm told delegates during the final day of NOW's 21st annual conference, which opened Friday at the Buffalo Convention Center.
NEWS
April 14, 1986
Feminist and civil rights activist Shirley Chisholm urged women to stop being "complacent, passive armchair recipients" and start planning for their senior years. Chisholm told an audience in Manchester, N.H., at the first New England Women's Conference on Aging, that elderly women are becoming "a new minority group with very special needs." "Many are widowed. They are living alone," said the former New York congresswoman. "Who is going to give them a job at age 60?"
NEWS
April 15, 1985 | LYNN SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Why couldn't American women unite to deliver a "woman's vote" last year for Geraldine Ferraro? Because there is no such thing--at least not yet, said politician-turned-educator Shirley Chisholm on Saturday during her keynote speech before the University of California Women's Leadership Conference at UC Irvine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1999
Neither Elizabeth Dole nor Shirley Chisholm was the first woman to run a serious campaign for president (letter, Oct. 26). If women's history were not so invisible, we would have already known that Victoria Woodhull ran in the 1872 presidential election, followed by Belva Lockwood in 1884. These two ran before women even had the right to vote. Talk about heroes! REGINA F. LARK Canoga Park
OPINION
November 15, 2008
Re "Women, interrupted," Opinion, Nov. 9 Whoever thought a woman would win the presidential election in 2008 wasn't paying attention. A CNN poll in the spring showed that 76% of Americans believed the country was ready for a black president, but only 63% felt the same about a female president. Shirley Chisholm wasn't exaggerating when she said, "I've always met more discrimination being a woman than being black." Vinette Gleason Mission Viejo
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