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Shirley Grindle

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1993 | DANA PARSONS
Her name is Shirley Grindle, and she's got a voice to match. Stern and a little on the clang-ey side, the Grindle voice sounds like cans rattling. And, oh, how it rattles when she's got something to say. Make no mistake about it, when they come to record the modern history of Orange County, Grindle's voice will be heard above the din.
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OPINION
February 1, 2008
Uber-gadfly Shirley Grindle has been saying for years that it's time to hand her job over to someone else. And what a job it is, enforcing the Orange County clean-government rules that Grindle is responsible for getting passed over the last 30 years. She scrutinizes campaign statements to see if candidates are taking donations above the limits. She keeps tabs on index cards, 50,000 of them boxed in a spare room at her house.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1998 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there's anyone who has done more to fight corruption in California politics than Shirley Grindle, it's news to Shirley. "I tell you, if we had more people doing what I do around the state, we'd have those bastards so afraid. We'd really clean this system up," the Ralph Nader of Orange County confided recently, between pillorying one politician for taking too much money and another for cozying up to a developer. The thing is, Shirley (everyone calls her Shirley) is probably right.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2007 | H. G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
It is the message no Orange County politician wants to hear: Shirley Grindle is on the phone. If money is the mother's milk of politics, Grindle is the health inspector who makes sure the milk is not tainted. For nearly 30 years, she has recorded every dollar local politicians have received. In rough numbers, that's about 50,000 contributors she's kept tabs on. She wrote the law that limits campaign donations to county candidates. And she's never taken a nickel in pay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2007 | H. G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
It is the message no Orange County politician wants to hear: Shirley Grindle is on the phone. If money is the mother's milk of politics, Grindle is the health inspector who makes sure the milk is not tainted. For nearly 30 years, she has recorded every dollar local politicians have received. In rough numbers, that's about 50,000 contributors she's kept tabs on. She wrote the law that limits campaign donations to county candidates. And she's never taken a nickel in pay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1988
Kudos to The Times and Shirley Grindle for your stand to help clean up Orange County politics. Despite good intentions, there are always those who will attempt to circumvent the law with respect to political contributions. This is apparently evidenced by the two current episodes concerning developers' contributions to Harriett M. Wieder and her resulting votes relating to their projects. Ultimately, in addition to the courts, it will be the voters who will decide where right stands from wrong.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1998
Thanks for the March 22 piece on political reform watchdog Shirley Grindle, "She Just Wants 'a System That's Incorruptible.' " Grindle's desire for an incorruptible system mirrors that of much of the public. Perhaps the major difference is that many wish while Grindle does. Her decades-long effort [and] her strong belief in proper public process and political reform is, in fact, incorruptible and legendary. Grindle's brilliance is matched only by her tenacity and her emphasis on honesty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1998
Thanks to William Mitchell and Shirley Grindle for campaign finance reform in Orange County ("TINCUP Proves That Reforms Are Possible," June 21). Common Cause and TINCUP prove that grass-roots democracy works. Mitchell is correct; regulating special-interest money is but one part of the electoral equation. It's time for these two public interest watchdogs to seek their political destiny. These leaders are role models for activists in every community. The public deserves honest, visionary leadership.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2000 | Jerry Hicks
Here's a pop quiz on women's suffrage which might turn your morning coffee bitter: Which nation first gave women the right to vote? If you said the United States, you missed it by 27 years. It was New Zealand in 1893; we didn't gain such civility until 1920, when we ratified the 19th Amendment. More to make you bristle: The colony of New Jersey in 1790 granted voting rights to "all free inhabitants" but later reneged when the men realized women expected that to mean them too.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1998 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's no wonder that, in more than 30 years of politicking in Orange County, Shirley Grindle and Randy Smith have never agreed on much. After all, he's a lobbyist and she's a watchdog who has made it her life's work to make sure people like Smith can't influence the political process. So when Grindle and Smith recently paired up to soften the outright ban on gifts to county officials that she had drawn up years ago, few could believe it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2000 | Jerry Hicks
Here's a pop quiz on women's suffrage which might turn your morning coffee bitter: Which nation first gave women the right to vote? If you said the United States, you missed it by 27 years. It was New Zealand in 1893; we didn't gain such civility until 1920, when we ratified the 19th Amendment. More to make you bristle: The colony of New Jersey in 1790 granted voting rights to "all free inhabitants" but later reneged when the men realized women expected that to mean them too.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1998
Thanks to William Mitchell and Shirley Grindle for campaign finance reform in Orange County ("TINCUP Proves That Reforms Are Possible," June 21). Common Cause and TINCUP prove that grass-roots democracy works. Mitchell is correct; regulating special-interest money is but one part of the electoral equation. It's time for these two public interest watchdogs to seek their political destiny. These leaders are role models for activists in every community. The public deserves honest, visionary leadership.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1998 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's no wonder that, in more than 30 years of politicking in Orange County, Shirley Grindle and Randy Smith have never agreed on much. After all, he's a lobbyist and she's a watchdog who has made it her life's work to make sure people like Smith can't influence the political process. So when Grindle and Smith recently paired up to soften the outright ban on gifts to county officials that she had drawn up years ago, few could believe it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1998
Thanks for the March 22 piece on political reform watchdog Shirley Grindle, "She Just Wants 'a System That's Incorruptible.' " Grindle's desire for an incorruptible system mirrors that of much of the public. Perhaps the major difference is that many wish while Grindle does. Her decades-long effort [and] her strong belief in proper public process and political reform is, in fact, incorruptible and legendary. Grindle's brilliance is matched only by her tenacity and her emphasis on honesty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1998 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there's anyone who has done more to fight corruption in California politics than Shirley Grindle, it's news to Shirley. "I tell you, if we had more people doing what I do around the state, we'd have those bastards so afraid. We'd really clean this system up," the Ralph Nader of Orange County confided recently, between pillorying one politician for taking too much money and another for cozying up to a developer. The thing is, Shirley (everyone calls her Shirley) is probably right.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1993 | DANA PARSONS
Her name is Shirley Grindle, and she's got a voice to match. Stern and a little on the clang-ey side, the Grindle voice sounds like cans rattling. And, oh, how it rattles when she's got something to say. Make no mistake about it, when they come to record the modern history of Orange County, Grindle's voice will be heard above the din.
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County supervisors were asked Tuesday to consider sweeping reforms that would effectively replace a 13-year-old campaign finance ordinance and for the first time cap all contributions to candidates for county offices. The proposal was outlined by community activist Shirley L. Grindle, who led the drive to overhaul Orange County supervisorial fund raising in 1978 and who chairs the committee that has spearheaded the current reform effort.
OPINION
February 1, 2008
Uber-gadfly Shirley Grindle has been saying for years that it's time to hand her job over to someone else. And what a job it is, enforcing the Orange County clean-government rules that Grindle is responsible for getting passed over the last 30 years. She scrutinizes campaign statements to see if candidates are taking donations above the limits. She keeps tabs on index cards, 50,000 of them boxed in a spare room at her house.
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County supervisors were asked Tuesday to consider sweeping reforms that would effectively replace a 13-year-old campaign finance ordinance and for the first time cap all contributions to candidates for county offices. The proposal was outlined by community activist Shirley L. Grindle, who led the drive to overhaul Orange County supervisorial fund raising in 1978 and who chairs the committee that has spearheaded the current reform effort.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1991 | SHIRLEY L. GRINDLE, Shirley L. Grindle is chairman of the TIN CUP Campaign Reform Committee .
In late 1977, a group of concerned citizens mounted a countywide initiative to regulate campaign contributions to the Orange County Board of Supervisors. On Dec. 8, 1978, their efforts were rewarded with the adoption of the Orange County Campaign Reform ordinance, familiarly known as TIN CUP (Time is Now, Clean Up Politics).
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