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Shirley Henderson

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2004 | Mark Olsen
Weaving between smaller, independent British films and roles in such high-profile movies as "Bridget Jones's Diary" and "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets," Shirley Henderson has quietly become one of the leading actresses working in the United Kingdom. After graduating from drama school in London in the late '80s, the Scottish-born Henderson, 38, spent a few years working in the theater and on British television before bringing her subdued, fragile presence to such films as "Trainspotting," "Topsy-Turvy," "24 Hour Party People" and "Once Upon a Time in the Midlands."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2004 | Mark Olsen
Weaving between smaller, independent British films and roles in such high-profile movies as "Bridget Jones's Diary" and "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets," Shirley Henderson has quietly become one of the leading actresses working in the United Kingdom. After graduating from drama school in London in the late '80s, the Scottish-born Henderson, 38, spent a few years working in the theater and on British television before bringing her subdued, fragile presence to such films as "Trainspotting," "Topsy-Turvy," "24 Hour Party People" and "Once Upon a Time in the Midlands."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2005 | From a Times staff writer
Kirsten Dunst has the title role in "Marie Antoinette," the first film from writer-director Sofia Coppola since her Oscar-winning comedy "Lost in Translation." Production begins in France this week, Columbia Pictures said Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
It's mind over matter if not always material in the chilly creep show "Close Your Eyes," formerly titled "Doctor Sleep" and "Hypnotic." Goran Visnjic plays Dr. Michael Strother, a hypnotherapist with an unwelcome gift for reading minds. Wracked by guilt over an incident from his shadowy past and newly relocated to London with his family, Michael works off the books weaning smokers of their nicotine jones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1996 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
The city's massage technicians and therapists, who for months have been at odds with some residents and officials over regulation of their business, have been invited to help put the final touches on a new ordinance governing the issue. Technicians and their attorneys have complained that the city's existing rules are too stringent and presume that all massage businesses are more akin to prostitution than to therapeutic services.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2010 | By Gary Goldstein, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Your Thanksgiving turkey has arrived on schedule and it's called "The Nutcracker in 3D. " Director Andrei Konchalovsky's gassy spectacle, inspired by Tchaikovsky's classic ballet score and its fairy tale source material (E.T.A. Hoffmann's short story), comes off like a wan mash-up of "The Wizard of Oz," "Alice in Wonderland," "Toy Story" and, frankly, "Willard," but with a manufactured sense of wonder and tension. Worse, trying to hip up this retro-tinged package with post-produced 3-D proves pointless and merely undermines the film's otherwise OK special effects.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Wonderland" is a loving group portrait of a South London working-class family and what they experience in the course of an exceptionally event-filled weekend. Director Michael Winterbottom and writer Laurence Coriat pile on the incidents a bit thickly and are not afraid to draw upon coincidence now and then in order to make the larger point that life can be a demanding business for one and all and that respect should be given those who forge ahead no matter what.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2003 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
British filmmaker Shane Meadows may share his first name with Alan Ladd's classic antihero, but he lacks the bullets to pull off "Once Upon a Time in the Midlands," his attempt at a western-influenced romance set in contemporary, working-class England. An odd mixture of Sergio Leone and BBC social realism, the film owes its title and much of its music to the western genre as well as a plot that features the return of a black hat determined to win back his woman.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
A man rushes into his apartment, desperate to begin swallowing the pills in his hand. He's looking for relief, but not the standard kind. As the title of this unusual and unusually moving film tells us, "Wilbur Wants to Kill Himself." A bleakly comic co-production from a pair of bleakly comic cultures, the Danish and the Scottish, "Wilbur" is the latest from Lone Scherfig, director of Denmark's delicately funny "Italian for Beginners."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Ever idiosyncratic and daring British filmmaker Sally Potter with "Yes" tells a searing -- the only word for it -- love story that lays bare the pain and rage of the conflicts between the Middle East and the West in the wake of 9/11 and the Iraq War, with its demonization of the Arab world on the one side and escalating hatred of America on the other.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2003
Aug. 1 Gigli Comedy Columbia With: Ben Affleck, Jennifer Lopez, Justin Bartha, Lainie Kazan. The idea: Gorgeous gangster tries to sort out a bungled kidnapping. Writer-director: Martin Brest. So? Fairly high curiosity factor. Dirty Pretty Things Thriller Miramax With: Audrey Tautou, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Sergi Lopez, Sophie Okonedo. The idea: A shocking discovery at the London hotel where they work propels a desperate man and woman into the city's underworld. Writer: Steve Knight.
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