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Shirley Horn

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February 18, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shirley Horn can be a demanding performer. Demanding in her insistence that an audience resonate with the extraordinarily slow pace she often chooses for her ballads; demanding in her willingness to break a mood she has created to express annoyance about a sound system; demanding in the occasional lapses of memory that offset the impact of a song. All those demands were present Wednesday night in the opening performance of Horn's two-week run at the Hollywood Roosevelt Cinegrill.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2005 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Shirley Horn, the Grammy-winning singer and pianist whose richly expressive vocal style made her one of the most popular performers in jazz, died Thursday night in Washington, D.C. She was 71. Horn died after a lengthy illness, the Verve Music Group, her record label, announced Friday. Horn lost her right foot to diabetes in 2001 and later much of her right leg. She had also battled breast cancer and arthritis over the last few years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1995 | DON HECKMAN
Shirley Horn has the remarkable ability to make a large concert hall feel like a small nightclub. So what happened Tuesday evening, when she opened a five-night run at the Hollywood Roosevelt Cinegrill, a venue in which every seat is no more than 50 feet or so from the stage? Instant intimacy, and then some.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2004 | Richard Harrington, Washington Post
These are, in many ways, good times for the venerable Washington singer and pianist Shirley Horn. Last month, the National Endowment for the Arts named Horn, 70, a jazz master, recognizing her lifelong contributions to the form, alongside Artie Shaw, Kenny Burrell, Jimmy Smith and George Wein. The $25,000 fellowship was a very sweet bonus.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2004 | Richard Harrington, Washington Post
These are, in many ways, good times for the venerable Washington singer and pianist Shirley Horn. Last month, the National Endowment for the Arts named Horn, 70, a jazz master, recognizing her lifelong contributions to the form, alongside Artie Shaw, Kenny Burrell, Jimmy Smith and George Wein. The $25,000 fellowship was a very sweet bonus.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Since her last local nightclub appearance just a year ago, the singer and pianist Shirley Horn has partially emerged from the cocoon of semi-obscurity that had kept her based in Washington, D.C. Her live album, recorded at Vine St. Bar & Grill, enjoyed enough acceptance to provide a needed reminder of her exceptional dual talents. At Catalina Bar and Grill, where she opened Thursday, Horn offered a somewhat restrained set, possibly occasioned by the small crowd on hand.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shirley Horn is a master of intimacy. Anyone who's seen her trio perform at a smaller venue--say, one of her infrequent appearances at the Cinegrill in Hollywood or the Vine St. Bar & Grill in Los Angeles--knows that the pianist-vocalist has a knack for getting cozy with an audience, as well as the material; a talent that can seemingly pull you out of your seat and land you in her lap.
NEWS
February 26, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special To The Times
The heart and soul of Shirley Horn's music has always been the symbiotic connection between her voice and her piano. Intimately linked in every way, it is one of the jazz world's most extraordinary combinations. Horn's performance Tuesday at Feinstein's at the Cinegrill, however, presented her in a different musical setting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2005 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Shirley Horn, the Grammy-winning singer and pianist whose richly expressive vocal style made her one of the most popular performers in jazz, died Thursday night in Washington, D.C. She was 71. Horn died after a lengthy illness, the Verve Music Group, her record label, announced Friday. Horn lost her right foot to diabetes in 2001 and later much of her right leg. She had also battled breast cancer and arthritis over the last few years.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1991 | DON HECKMAN
It's hard to believe that Shirley Horn--despite two best-selling albums in 1988 and 1989 and increasing public visibility--continues to be one of the great unacknowledged treasures of jazz. Although she is a superb pianist who probably takes her playing more seriously than her vocalizing, she is arguably one of the finest jazz singers in the world today. This is a gorgeous Horn showcase, with masterful performances of 14 carefully chosen, beautifully produced songs.
NEWS
February 26, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special To The Times
The heart and soul of Shirley Horn's music has always been the symbiotic connection between her voice and her piano. Intimately linked in every way, it is one of the jazz world's most extraordinary combinations. Horn's performance Tuesday at Feinstein's at the Cinegrill, however, presented her in a different musical setting.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There are as many different ways to approach jazz singing as there are jazz singers. The arc between, say, Louis Armstrong and Sarah Vaughan covers a great deal of creative territory, yet each is a vital element in the colorful tapestry of the music. On Wednesday night, "After Hours," a Lexus Jazz at the Hollywood Bowl concert, showcased two unique musical talents: Shirley Horn and Dianne Reeves.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Charlie Haden has gotten a remarkable amount of mileage out of his much-praised "The Art of the Song" project. The album that started it has been reviewed in extremely laudatory terms, and he has managed to produce a surprising number of live performances, given that the presentation calls for a good-sized string ensemble. Earlier this year, "The Art of the Song" was presented in somewhat reduced format--solely with singer Bill Henderson and without Shirley Horn--at the Skirball Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shirley Horn can be a demanding performer. Demanding in her insistence that an audience resonate with the extraordinarily slow pace she often chooses for her ballads; demanding in her willingness to break a mood she has created to express annoyance about a sound system; demanding in the occasional lapses of memory that offset the impact of a song. All those demands were present Wednesday night in the opening performance of Horn's two-week run at the Hollywood Roosevelt Cinegrill.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Compare the delivery of vocalist-pianist Shirley Horn to some well-known pop singer--say Stevie Wonder--and the subtlety and drama of Horn's craft is immediately apparent. As far-fetched as that comparison might seem, it became reality Tuesday at the Cinegrill inside the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel near the end of the Horn trio's first show of a five-night run.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1996 | Don Heckman
SHIRLEY HORN "The Main Ingredient" Verve * * * Shirley Horn had a provocative idea for this session: bring a bunch of her favorite musicians over to her Washington home to record a few tunes in a relaxed environment. "Years ago, coming home from a gig," she recalls, "the guys used to come to my house. We would eat and we'd just play and be like family. . . . I wanted that again."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1995 | DON HECKMAN
The art of making music was in full flower at the Cinegrill Wednesday night as Shirley Horn kicked off a two-week run at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel's elegant nightclub. To attempt to limit Horn's opening-night performance by genre or style would be an injustice to an artist whose work transcends category. Yes, she is a jazz singer who explores a familiar repertoire. And, yes, she performs within the confines of a fairly narrow vocal range and a not especially wide timbral coloration.
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