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Shirley L Grindle

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1992
Supervisor (Don R.) Roth and his self-designated "campaign law expert" attorney Dana Reed must think there are two sets of rules--one for Roth and one for everybody else. How else could there be so many incidents of failure by Roth to disclose acceptance of gifts and loans from those who benefit financially from his influence and support on the Board of Supervisors? Roth is a political hangover from the days when being "wined and dined" and accepting numerous freebies from vested interests went with the job. Well, those days changed in 1974 when California enacted the Political Reform Act to clean up such political practices.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2000
It was a delightful sight to behold! And, the photo was nice, too. There in the May 28 edition's Orange County Voices column was Shirley Grindle advocating more participation in politics by Orange County citizens, not less. It was enough to warm the cockles of an old Republican county chairman's heart. Grindle, the long-serving, and sometimes intimidating, self-appointed watchdog of local campaign financing, has come to the well-reasoned conclusion that when more people participate in politics by contributing to the candidates of their choice, the government will likely be better.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1990 | DAN WEIKEL
A political activist who has taken Sheriff Brad Gates to task over his campaign expenditures vowed Thursday to challenge a decision clearing Gates of charges that he illegally spent donations to rent space for his reelection headquarters from himself. Dissatisfied with local authorities, Shirley L. Grindle of Orange said she will ask the state attorney general's office to consider her allegations against Gates, which she presented to the district attorney in April.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1998 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's no wonder that, in more than 30 years of politicking in Orange County, Shirley Grindle and Randy Smith have never agreed on much. After all, he's a lobbyist and she's a watchdog who has made it her life's work to make sure people like Smith can't influence the political process. So when Grindle and Smith recently paired up to soften the outright ban on gifts to county officials that she had drawn up years ago, few could believe it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2000
It was a delightful sight to behold! And, the photo was nice, too. There in the May 28 edition's Orange County Voices column was Shirley Grindle advocating more participation in politics by Orange County citizens, not less. It was enough to warm the cockles of an old Republican county chairman's heart. Grindle, the long-serving, and sometimes intimidating, self-appointed watchdog of local campaign financing, has come to the well-reasoned conclusion that when more people participate in politics by contributing to the candidates of their choice, the government will likely be better.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A local activist who is leading an effort to limit campaign contributions to Orange County politicians on Wednesday released a list of more than 20 local citizens and community leaders who have joined her committee and are backing the effort. "We've got a cross-section of Orange County," said Shirley L. Grindle, a former county planning commissioner who, in 1977, helped draft a county campaign law ultimately adopted by the Board of Supervisors and still in place today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal to overhaul campaign fund-raising in Orange County elections hasn't even been drafted yet, and already it has divided the county's political leadership. Sheriff Brad Gates and Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi, the county's top law enforcement officials, appeared Tuesday to be on opposite sides of the proposal, though Capizzi wants to see the final draft before committing himself.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sparing no expense, Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates threw three Christmas parties for his office staff at the tony Four Seasons Hotel and The Ritz in Newport Beach. He picked up the tab with $5,891 in campaign funds. The gunslinger get-up Gates wore to a California State Sheriff's Assn. conference cost $1,598, and the price tag for art he wanted for an election fund-raiser was $13,872. Political contributions paid for both.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Fair Political Practices Commission has cleared Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates of wrongdoing following claims by a local citizen that Gates had illegally spent thousands of dollars in campaign funds in winning reelection to a fifth term earlier this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1990 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates was accused Friday of illegally using campaign funds to lease space for his election headquarters from a company he and his wife own, according to a complaint filed with the district attorney's office. Shirley L. Grindle, a political activist from Orange, charges in the complaint that Gates, who is seeking a fifth term, has paid $1,611 in rent this year to Ortega Equestrian Center in violation of the state Political Reform Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1992
Supervisor (Don R.) Roth and his self-designated "campaign law expert" attorney Dana Reed must think there are two sets of rules--one for Roth and one for everybody else. How else could there be so many incidents of failure by Roth to disclose acceptance of gifts and loans from those who benefit financially from his influence and support on the Board of Supervisors? Roth is a political hangover from the days when being "wined and dined" and accepting numerous freebies from vested interests went with the job. Well, those days changed in 1974 when California enacted the Political Reform Act to clean up such political practices.
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County supervisors were asked Tuesday to consider sweeping reforms that would effectively replace a 13-year-old campaign finance ordinance and for the first time cap all contributions to candidates for county offices. The proposal was outlined by community activist Shirley L. Grindle, who led the drive to overhaul Orange County supervisorial fund raising in 1978 and who chairs the committee that has spearheaded the current reform effort.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1991 | SHIRLEY L. GRINDLE, Shirley L. Grindle is chairman of the TIN CUP Campaign Reform Committee .
In late 1977, a group of concerned citizens mounted a countywide initiative to regulate campaign contributions to the Orange County Board of Supervisors. On Dec. 8, 1978, their efforts were rewarded with the adoption of the Orange County Campaign Reform ordinance, familiarly known as TIN CUP (Time is Now, Clean Up Politics).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A local activist who is leading an effort to limit campaign contributions to Orange County politicians on Wednesday released a list of more than 20 local citizens and community leaders who have joined her committee and are backing the effort. "We've got a cross-section of Orange County," said Shirley L. Grindle, a former county planning commissioner who, in 1977, helped draft a county campaign law ultimately adopted by the Board of Supervisors and still in place today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal to overhaul campaign fund-raising in Orange County elections hasn't even been drafted yet, and already it has divided the county's political leadership. Sheriff Brad Gates and Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi, the county's top law enforcement officials, appeared Tuesday to be on opposite sides of the proposal, though Capizzi wants to see the final draft before committing himself.
NEWS
September 17, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated by loopholes that have undercut Orange County's 12-year-old campaign finance law, drafters of the ordinance Monday called for major reforms in the way candidates raise money to run for office. In a letter sent to members of the Board of Supervisors, community activist Shirley L.
NEWS
September 17, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated by loopholes that have undercut Orange County's 12-year-old campaign finance law, drafters of the ordinance Monday called for major reforms in the way candidates raise money to run for office. In a letter sent to members of the Board of Supervisors, community activist Shirley L.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The guts of Orange County campaign reform sit in a collection of six cardboard boxes, neatly stowed side by side in Shirley L. Grindle's den. Each box holds hundreds of 5-by-7 cards. Each card lists the name of a single campaign contributor and how much that person or organization has given to a county supervisor. Each contribution is dated. The cards are carefully typed, scrupulously double-checked.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The guts of Orange County campaign reform sit in a collection of six cardboard boxes, neatly stowed side by side in Shirley L. Grindle's den. Each box holds hundreds of 5-by-7 cards. Each card lists the name of a single campaign contributor and how much that person or organization has given to a county supervisor. Each contribution is dated. The cards are carefully typed, scrupulously double-checked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Fair Political Practices Commission has cleared Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates of wrongdoing following claims by a local citizen that Gates had illegally spent thousands of dollars in campaign funds in winning reelection to a fifth term earlier this year.
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