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Shirley Lampel

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1989
I have a question for Shirley Lampel and the 23,000 bondholders of Lincoln Savings & Loan. How many of you voted for former President Reagan with his anti-government, read deregulation, philosophy? Those of us who did not are going to pay dearly for that blunder! DONALD EGGENSPERGER Redondo Beach
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1989
I'm surprised that Shirley Lampel, the lady who purchased worthless bonds from Lincoln Savings, would place such faith in the promise of a politician already campaigning for his Senate seat. How ironic that Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) is trying to blame the very regulators who wanted to take action against Lincoln Savings until the senator put the political screws on them. It seems that Cranston would have the taxpayers pay out another $200 million to help him get reelected. If Cranston sincerely wants to help, I suggest that he put to use that $900,000-plus he received for helping Charles H. Keating Jr. stay in business: What could be more just than having Keating's money recoup some losses his victims incurred?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1989
I'm surprised that Shirley Lampel, the lady who purchased worthless bonds from Lincoln Savings, would place such faith in the promise of a politician already campaigning for his Senate seat. How ironic that Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) is trying to blame the very regulators who wanted to take action against Lincoln Savings until the senator put the political screws on them. It seems that Cranston would have the taxpayers pay out another $200 million to help him get reelected. If Cranston sincerely wants to help, I suggest that he put to use that $900,000-plus he received for helping Charles H. Keating Jr. stay in business: What could be more just than having Keating's money recoup some losses his victims incurred?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1989
I have a question for Shirley Lampel and the 23,000 bondholders of Lincoln Savings & Loan. How many of you voted for former President Reagan with his anti-government, read deregulation, philosophy? Those of us who did not are going to pay dearly for that blunder! DONALD EGGENSPERGER Redondo Beach
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shirley Lampel, an outspoken leader of more than 23,000 investors who purchased now-worthless junk bonds at Lincoln Savings & Loan offices, said Saturday she has won a pledge from Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) to assist them in their efforts to get their money back. Cranston made the promise during a 10-minute private session with Lampel Friday night in Orange County.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1990 | James S. Granelli, Times staff writer
Sen. Alan Cranston's bill to allow bondholders of Lincoln Savings & Loan's former parent firm to sue the government appears to be bollixed up in a Senate committee, going nowhere. The California Democrat, under political heat for intervening with federal regulators on Lincoln's behalf, is wooing bondholders who sunk what is now said to be $275 million into the parent firm, American Continental Corp. in Phoenix.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Alan Cranston said Monday that he will introduce legislation, perhaps as early as today, to allow bondholders hurt by the collapse of Lincoln Savings & Loan and its parent firm to sue the federal government for negligence in approving the sale of the bonds. The California Democrat, whose political career is jeopardized by the Lincoln scandal, also released a copy of a letter he sent the Justice Department last week asking for help in letting bondholders seek relief from the government.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of the bondholders who lost more than $200 million in the collapse of Lincoln Savings & Loan want the Senate Ethics Committee to recommend the ouster of Sen. Alan Cranston for his role in the Lincoln scandal. Some also reacted angrily to the committee's decision Wednesday to close the case against the other four of the so-called Keating Five and let them off with what the bondholders called a "slap on the wrist."
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The news that Charles H. Keating Jr. was convicted Wednesday of 17 counts of securities fraud on his 68th birthday brought a chorus of cheers from those who liked him least: the bondholders of American Continental, Keating's former real estate development company. "He got what he deserved," said Harold Rosenberg, a Sherman Oaks attorney. "His fraud and connivances brought a lot of hardship for senior citizens who could ill afford it."
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The news that Charles H. Keating Jr. was convicted Wednesday on 17 counts of securities fraud on his 68th birthday brought a chorus of cheers from those who liked him least: the bondholders of American Continental, Keating's former real estate development company. "I'm happy, I'm happy," said Leah Kane, 70, a resident of Laguna Hills Leisure World who lost $15,000 in American Continental bonds. "I want a shot of whiskey right now and I don't even drink."
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shirley Lampel, an outspoken leader of more than 23,000 investors who purchased now-worthless junk bonds at Lincoln Savings & Loan offices, said Saturday she has won a pledge from Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) to assist them in their efforts to get their money back. Cranston made the promise during a 10-minute private session with Lampel Friday night in Orange County.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Small investors, who lost $192.8 million after the parent company of Irvine-based Lincoln Savings & Loan filed for bankruptcy nearly two years ago, will soon be getting checks for a small bit of their money back--about 6 cents on the dollar. Star Bank in Cincinnati mailed the checks Wednesday totaling $11.6 million to 11,472 registered holders of American Continental Corp. bonds, said Thomas R. Schuck, a bank attorney.
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