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Shirley Lord

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NEWS
March 31, 1989 | PADDY CALISTRO
How's this for the makings of a miniseries: Teri, once a supermodel, is told by her less-than-sensitive husband that he's going to trade her in for a younger model. She heads for a Southern California "rejuvenation" clinic to get a wrinkle-removing face peel, but the chemicals go awry and poor Teri loses face. Literally. After her reported suicide, her two daughters begin to investigate their mother's death, which leads them into the fast lane of the beauty world.
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NEWS
March 31, 1989 | PADDY CALISTRO
How's this for the makings of a miniseries: Teri, once a supermodel, is told by her less-than-sensitive husband that he's going to trade her in for a younger model. She heads for a Southern California "rejuvenation" clinic to get a wrinkle-removing face peel, but the chemicals go awry and poor Teri loses face. Literally. After her reported suicide, her two daughters begin to investigate their mother's death, which leads them into the fast lane of the beauty world.
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MAGAZINE
May 21, 1989 | PADDY CALISTRO
SHORT HAIR used to be the kiss of death for fashion models, who needed the versatility of long tresses. But now the above-the-ears crop is suddenly the international rage. Credit Canadian model Linda Evangelista, whose daring haircut--clipped by Parisian stylist Julien--looks so new that she's become one of the Elite modeling agency's hot properties, right up there with long-haired mannequins Paulina Porizkova and Cindy Crawford. "In this business, having a distinctive style gets noticed," says Monique Pillard, Elite president.
NEWS
April 11, 1994 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aida Grey, who died Friday of heart failure, made beauty her business--but she avoided its tragic flaw. She never slipped out of reach. Imagine entering her Beverly Hills salon, a shrine to rococo gold and crystal on Wilshire Boulevard. There she would be, weighted with strands of jewels, fitted in a custom-made James Galanos suit. She was perfect, except for one thing. Her feet were dunked in a bucket of water. She was having a pedicure on her way to a cocktail party.
NEWS
May 31, 1998 | IRENE LACHER
Victoria D'Angelo has a million-dollar smile. Not because she's spent that much tarting it up with fancy dentistry. And not because people have paid that much to see it on-screen. A million bucks, give or take, is what D'Angelo has saved smiling her way past the gates of big-ticket events over the years. They call her the Crasher. Or they don't, which has her miffed at Warner Books, the publisher of Shirley Lord's latest novel, "The Crasher." More on that later.
NEWS
June 28, 1985 | JENNINGS PARROTT
--Fatima Amatulla walked into a Society National Bank branch in Cleveland dressed in a long black dress and a veil, but bank security officers forced her to leave before she could pay a $92 telephone bill. "I told (the guard) we dress like this all the time, and I told him that I just wanted to pay a bill, not cash a check," Amatulla said. "But I guess fear of what you can't see makes them jittery. I wonder if they treat all (Muslim) sisters with veiled faces like that."
NEWS
March 11, 1998 | DIANE SEO AND TANYA LOH
For all aspiring actors and actresses, ambitious future presidents and other would-be members of the truly rich and famous, we hope you weren't too humbled by not being invited to down your share of the bubbly at Time magazine's humongous bash in New York last week. The most notable of notables, the elite of the elite, the A-plus of the A-list, these uber-celebrities gathered to commemorate the magazine's 75th anniversary.
NEWS
September 23, 1987 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
Sometimes they are friends, Henry Kissinger was saying, and sometimes they are antagonists. "We have gone through cycles," said the former secretary of state of his relationship with novelist/journalist/lexicographer William Safire. On Monday night, though, the two were best of buddies at Kissinger's riverfront apartment, greeting 100 or so old friends who had come to celebrate the publication of "Freedom," Safire's 1,125-page novel about Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War.
NEWS
April 13, 2006 | From the Associated Press
CHOOSING the title of a Harlequin release can be as challenging as writing the book, with the author and editors sometimes sparring for weeks over the precise word or words to entice that imagined reader on the supermarket checkout line. But when romance-suspense novelist Heather Graham submitted the manuscript for her latest, an exotic thriller about piracy and murder set in part off the Florida coast, everyone agreed that Graham had chosen the perfect name: "The Island."
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | DEBRA GENDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What's happening at Barneys? If you haven't been asked that question lately, you probably don't know--or care--about the answer. That's cool. But we think gossiping about the New York-based store's long-awaited Beverly Hills debut is a refreshing break from "Disasters Bring Out the Best In Us" stories. Late last fall, insiders say, Barneys reps swooped into town, looking for a charity to honor at the store's opening celebration. Months passed. Last week, the store advertised for sales help.
NEWS
January 21, 1994 | DEBRA GENDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Never has the rarefied world of Paris couture seemed as far from reality as this week. As Los Angeles dug itself out of earthquake rubble, designers presented the most costly and exquisite summer clothing money can buy. But they didn't do it blithely. Oh, no. Christian Lacroix expressed his sensitivity to the world beyond one-of-a-kind $30,000 dresses in a program note.
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