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Shirley S Dettloff

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
The city is in the market for a Police Department auditor now that the City Council has decided not to pursue a proposal to create a citizens review board. The board would have monitored the department and heard complaints about officers. Critics have said that police were too heavy-handed in quelling July 4th disturbances last year, creating an atmosphere that is scaring away tourists. But Police Chief Ronald E.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1996 | DEBRA CANO
After a four-hour debate this week on how to deal with a $4-million operating budget deficit, the City Council declared that three programs will not be affected: drug education in schools, senior outreach services and Neighborhood Watch. "It's a strong message to the public that the council has taken a stand," Mayor Dave Sullivan said Tuesday. In recent weeks, the council has been deluged with pleas from supporters of the three programs not to eliminate them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1996 | DEBRA CANO
City leaders will trek to Washington next week to lobby federal officials for almost $1 million to study how the city's infrastructure would fare in an earthquake. Federal legislation adopted in 1990 as part of a water bill gave authorization to pay for studies on Southern California cities' needs for earthquake retrofitting to water-related infrastructure, such as sewer, storm drain and water systems. The city will seek $900,000 to evaluate the infrastructure and plan improvements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1995 | DEBRA CANO
City Treasurer Donald L. Watson will make a presentation to council members at a workshop Monday about the city's investment policies. "We just want our treasurer to go over our investment policies . . . so we have a clear idea on how our money is invested and to ensure that we have safe investments," said Councilwoman Shirley S. Dettloff, who suggested the workshop in response to the Orange County bankruptcy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1997 | JULIO V. CANO
About half of all city employees will receive a 2% pay raise for each of the next two years under an agreement approved by the City Council. The city will pay the 520 members of the Municipal Employees Assn., including librarians and janitors, a total of $433,000 for the increased salary and benefits, or about an $830 raise per employee annually, starting Dec. 27. Municipal employees had been working without a pay raise since 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT
City officials managed to gain $1 million from the federal budget for a fiber optic cable to help control traffic. A separate federal grant includes $200,000 to buy new vehicles for the city's senior citizens transportation program. Both grants were included in the Federal Department of Transportation Omnibus Spending Bill passed last month, according to the Ferguson Group, the city's lobbyists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1994 | DEBRA CANO
The city's four newly elected council members say they will strive to improve business, raise revenue to pay for services and reach accord on future growth. "We need more business, more employees and certainly more sales tax revenues," said Dave Garofalo, 49, who has been involved in the community for more than 20 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1997 | JULIO V. CANO
The City Council has renamed Crystal Street, now Gothard Street, as part of a recent street realignment project that did away with a troublesome five-way intersection. Gothard Street has been aligned with Crystal Street, eliminating the five-way intersection of Gothard and Main Streets and Garfield Avenue that had produced inefficient traffic flow and slowed emergency responses to the area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1996 | DEBRA CANO
A long-range financial outlook presented to the City Council this week projected a $200-million budget deficit over the next 20 years. In addition, preliminary estimates indicate that costs to maintain, repair and replace the city's infrastructure will total $700 million. "What we're really saying is we have an estimated $900-million problem, and that isn't something you solve by finding $500,000 here and $1 million there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1998 | JULIO V. CANO
City officials said this week they may have more power than earlier thought in controlling water service to a controversial proposal for 1,235 homes on the Bolsa Chica mesa. Koll Real Estate Group has formed its own water company and arranged supply service for the development from a private source in Cypress. But the company recently asked Huntington Beach for permission to install a pipeline at Bolsa Chica Street.
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