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Shirley Temple

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1994 | JAMES ELMENDORF
The Burbank Central Library in August will host an exhibit of photos and memorabilia celebrating Shirley Temple. The exhibit will cover Temple's career from her days as a child star through her tenure as a U.S. ambassador. The exhibit was assembled by Delmar Watson, a close friend of Temple's and himself a former child actor. The photographs are part of the Watson Family Trust, a collection that includes more than 2 million prints.
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OPINION
February 14, 2014
Re "Child star, diplomat," Obituary, Feb. 12 Shirley Temple Black, who died Monday, had a wonderful sense of humor. When she ran for Congress in a special election in 1967, she had her headquarters on Ventura Boulevard in Sherman Oaks, with a sign in the window that said, "Vote for me or I will hold my breathe until I turn blue. " I remember laughing out loud when I saw that sign. Robert Berliner Sherman Oaks ALSO: Letters: No executions -- for now Letters: Mammograms, yes or no?
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1994
Photographs and memorabilia highlighting the life of child actor-turned-U.S.-ambassador Shirley Temple are on view through Dec. 15 at the Rio Hondo College Library. The exhibition was assembled by Delmar Watson, a childhood friend of Temple's and a fellow former child actor. The college is located at 3600 Workman Mill Road, Whittier. The exhibition is open for viewing Mondays through Thursdays, from 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Information: (310) 908-3417.
OPINION
February 13, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
As an adult, Shirley Temple Black shed her signature ringlets, became a Republican fundraiser and went on to a career as a respected diplomat in the Nixon, Ford and George H.W. Bush administrations. Even her boss, Henry Kissinger, was impressed, calling her "very intelligent, very tough-minded, very disciplined. " But not all fundraisers are as able as Black, who died Monday. Consider George James Tsunis, who has been nominated by President Obama as ambassador to Norway, and Colleen Bell, Obama's pick to be ambassador to Hungary.
NEWS
August 14, 1989 | From Times wire services
Former child star Shirley Temple Black has arrived in Prague to take up her duties as the new U.S. ambassador to Czechoslovakia, the U.S. Embassy said today. Black, 61, served as U.S. ambassador to Ghana from 1974 to 1976, White House chief of protocol for President Gerald R. Ford and as a member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations in 1969. She plans to present her credentials to Czechoslovak President Gustav Husak in the near future but no date has been set, an embassy spokesman said.
NEWS
June 2, 1988 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
She was the No. 1 box-office star in America for four straight years during the 1930s, the dimpled darling of the Depression. But even the fabled childhood of Shirley Temple--Hollywood's most famous child star--could not be protected from such real-life intrusions as kidnap and extortion attempts, death threats and an attempted seduction by a Hollywood producer when she was only 12 years old.
NEWS
October 6, 1988 | SHELDON ITO, Times Staff Writer
The Santa Monica Historical Society will make a little history itself Saturday when it opens the city's first museum of history and culture. The museum, at 2050 Colorado Ave., will feature artifacts ranging from a stone corn grinder used by pre-Columbian American Indians to flapper dresses from the 1920s to photos of Shirley Temple, Lawrence Welk and other entertainers who lived in the city, according to Louise Gabriel, who has spearheaded the society's push for the museum.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1988 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
In the 1936 film "Poor Little Rich Girl," child star Shirley Temple plays Barbara Barry, a wide-eyed, curly haired pixie who becomes an overnight star singing radio jingles for a soap company. In real life, as in her movies, Shirley Temple could work magic when it came to selling products. So valuable is her name that in the past 50 years, she estimates, she licensed it for use in selling 140 products from dolls to music boxes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the most memorable moments on the Academy Awards last month was seeing Shirley Temple participate in the reunion of former Oscar winners. When her name was announced, the audience at the Shrine Auditorium responded with unabashed enthusiasm. And the dimple-cheeked Temple flashed that same bright smile that endeared her to audiences more than 60 years ago. It's hard to believe that Temple, who was the No. 1 box-office attraction for several years in the 1930s, turned 70 last week.
NEWS
January 30, 1994 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Singing, dancing, crying, pouting and matchmaking. The moppet of all moppets did 'em all. And you can catch a good bit of it on a Family Channel Shirley Temple movie marathon as an alternative to Super Bowl Sunday football. First up is the 1936 drama Captain January (noon-1:30 p.m. Family Channel), in which Shirley plays an orphan being raised by a kind lighthouse keeper (Guy Kibbee). A young Buddy Ebsen also stars. A highlight is Shirley and Ebsen dancing to the delightful "The Codfish Ball."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik and Amy Kaufman
By singing and dancing into the hearts of Depression-era America, Shirley Temple opened the door for hundreds of childhood performers to follow. Yet the realm of stardom in which those young stars now find themselves couldn't be more different than the world Temple helped create. Shirley Temple Black, who died Monday at age 85, performed in dozens of movies before she even hit her teens. For several years in the 1930s she was a bigger box-office draw than any adult star of the period, a group that included Vivien Leigh and Greta Garbo, as the studio both pushed Temple to crank out movies and protected her from the scrutiny that came with it.  PHOTOS: Shirley Temple Black, 1928-2014 It is Temple's legacy that, directly or otherwise, made possible the emergence of a wide group of modern-era youthful entertainers, including Jodie Foster, Justin Bieber, Gary Coleman and Miley Cyrus, to name just a few. It is also a culture that has mutated significantly in Temple's wake - and not always for the best.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - - By the late 1980s, Depression-era child actress Shirley Temple Black had been retired from Hollywood for some 40 years and was nearing the end of her second career as a U.S. diplomat. But in China, her star was enjoying an improbable -- and meteoric -- rise.   After decades of isolation from the West, China had begun to open up, and on Sunday nights, families were tuning into state-run television for two special programs featuring foreign films: “Upright Theater” and “Translated Movies for TV.” Programmers, though, insisted on family-friendly fare, sans anything scandalous or political.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Christy Khoshaba
Shirley Temple Black, the dimpled curly-haired scene-stealer, warmed hearts from the start. She died this week at age 85 at her home near San Francisco, and though Temple Black went on to lead a storied life well outside Hollywood, there are still a few facts that some readers may not know. Here's a sampling: Watch out Hollywood, I'm here: At 3, Temple made her on-screen debut, but it was a strange one. She and a handful of other toddlers starred in the 1932 parody series “Baby Burlesks.” The toddlers wore diapers and barely there lingerie, playing hookers and World War I soldiers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Former child star and later U.S. ambassador Shirley Temple Black died Monday at age 85. TCM plans to air a marathon of her most popular films on March 9. The marathon, which begins at 1:30 p.m. PST, begins with "Heidi," her 1937 film based on the Swiss children's story. Other films in the lineup include "Stowaway" and "Bright Eyes," the 1934 film that featured her singing "On the Good Ship Lollipop" and paved the way for Shirley Temple Development to be set up at 20th Century Fox. PHOTOS: Shirley Temple Black, 1928-2014 "The Little Princess," "I'll Be Seeing You," "A Kiss for Corliss" and "That Hagen Girl" will also be part of the marathon.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2014 | By Susan King
News of Shirley Temple Black's death Monday night brought back wonderful memories for me, of my childhood and my early love of Hollywood. Shirley Temple was one of my early obsessions. From the age of 5, I would watch and watch her movies from "Bright Eyes" to "Poor Little Rich Girl" to my favorite "The Little Princess. " My mother was my Temple enabler so to speak. She had turned on the television one Saturday afternoon when we were living in Miami to "Shirley Temple Theater," a weekly showcase of her classic films.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | Valerie J. Nelson
Shirley Temple Black, who as the most popular child movie star of all time lifted a filmgoing nation's spirits during the Depression and then grew up to be a diplomat, has died. She was 85. Black died late Monday at her home in Woodside, Calif., according to publicist Cheryl J. Kagan. No cause was given. From 1935 through 1938, the curly-haired moppet billed as Shirley Temple was the top box-office draw in the nation. She saved what became 20th Century Fox studios from bankruptcy and made more than 40 movies before she turned 12. PHOTOS: Shirley Temple Black Hollywood recognized the enchanting, dimpled scene-stealer's importance to the industry with a “special award” -- a miniature Oscar -- at the Academy Awards for 1934, the year she sang and danced her way into America's collective heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
When Shirley Temple Black walks onto the stage of the Shrine Exposition Hall on Sunday evening to receive the 42nd Screen Actors Guild lifetime achievement award for her movie career and humanitarian efforts, most of her young fans will probably be shocked to see she's a 77-year-old grandmother.
NEWS
April 3, 1993
Matthew C. Lasher, 97, a Beverly Hills orthodontist whose patients included Loretta Young, Ginger Rogers, Dana Andrews and Shirley Temple. Known as "orthodontist to the stars," Lasher practiced for more than 50 years, improving the smiles of dozens of celebrities and their children. On Tuesday in Lancaster.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Shirley Temple Black's early childhood home in Santa Monica sold for its asking price of $2.489 million in less than two weeks of coming on the market. The Spanish style-house, built in 1926, features vaulted wood beam ceilings, three bedrooms, two bathrooms and 1,966 square feet of living space. The yard is planted with apricot, apple and plum trees. Black, 85, starred in such hit films as “Bright Eyes,” “Curly Top” and “Heidi” during the 1930s and won an honorary Juvenile Academy Award.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2011
Sybil Jason, 83, a former child actress signed by the Warner Brothers Studio to rival Twentieth Century Fox star Shirley Temple, died Aug. 23 at her home in Northridge, her family announced. She had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Born in Cape Town, South Africa, on Nov. 23, 1927, Jason began singing and dancing as a toddler. Her uncle Harry Jacobson, a pianist who accompanied stage performers in London, found her parts in British vaudeville productions, where she was discovered by studio head Jack Warner.
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