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Shirley Temple Black

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OPINION
February 14, 2014
Re "Child star, diplomat," Obituary, Feb. 12 Shirley Temple Black, who died Monday, had a wonderful sense of humor. When she ran for Congress in a special election in 1967, she had her headquarters on Ventura Boulevard in Sherman Oaks, with a sign in the window that said, "Vote for me or I will hold my breathe until I turn blue. " I remember laughing out loud when I saw that sign. Robert Berliner Sherman Oaks ALSO: Letters: No executions -- for now Letters: Mammograms, yes or no?
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OPINION
February 14, 2014
Re "Execution moratorium declared," Feb. 12 Washington Gov. Jay Inslee's move to place a moratorium on his state's death penalty deserves the close attention of California Gov. Jerry Brown, who should follow suit by enacting a similar moratorium while he is in office. Such a declaration would not only send a clear message that the death penalty is an outdated, inhumane and unworkable method of punishment, it could also immediately save millions of tax dollars, including those going to our beleaguered prison system, where the cost of housing death row inmates is dramatically higher than that of housing other inmates.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2014 | By Susan King
News of Shirley Temple Black's death Monday night brought back wonderful memories for me, of my childhood and my early love of Hollywood. Shirley Temple was one of my early obsessions. From the age of 5, I would watch and watch her movies from "Bright Eyes" to "Poor Little Rich Girl" to my favorite "The Little Princess. " My mother was my Temple enabler so to speak. She had turned on the television one Saturday afternoon when we were living in Miami to "Shirley Temple Theater," a weekly showcase of her classic films.
OPINION
February 14, 2014
Re "Child star, diplomat," Obituary, Feb. 12 Shirley Temple Black, who died Monday, had a wonderful sense of humor. When she ran for Congress in a special election in 1967, she had her headquarters on Ventura Boulevard in Sherman Oaks, with a sign in the window that said, "Vote for me or I will hold my breathe until I turn blue. " I remember laughing out loud when I saw that sign. Robert Berliner Sherman Oaks ALSO: Letters: No executions -- for now Letters: Mammograms, yes or no?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Christy Khoshaba
Shirley Temple Black, the dimpled curly-haired scene-stealer, warmed hearts from the start. She died this week at age 85 at her home near San Francisco, and though Temple Black went on to lead a storied life well outside Hollywood, there are still a few facts that some readers may not know. Here's a sampling: Watch out Hollywood, I'm here: At 3, Temple made her on-screen debut, but it was a strange one. She and a handful of other toddlers starred in the 1932 parody series “Baby Burlesks.” The toddlers wore diapers and barely there lingerie, playing hookers and World War I soldiers.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Shirley Temple Black's early childhood home in Santa Monica sold for its asking price of $2.489 million in less than two weeks of coming on the market. The Spanish style-house, built in 1926, features vaulted wood beam ceilings, three bedrooms, two bathrooms and 1,966 square feet of living space. The yard is planted with apricot, apple and plum trees. Black, 85, starred in such hit films as “Bright Eyes,” “Curly Top” and “Heidi” during the 1930s and won an honorary Juvenile Academy Award.
NEWS
August 4, 1989 | Reuters
The Senate has approved the nomination of Shirley Temple Black, former child movie star, as U.S. ambassador to Czechoslovakia. She had served as U.S. ambassador to Ghana from 1974 to 1976 and chief of White House protocol from 1976 to 1977.
NEWS
September 16, 1988 | Ann Conway
Get ready for a run on flashbulbs. Shirley Temple Black will be in Newport Beach on Nov. 20 (know it seems like star-years away, but invitations are being readied as we speak) to celebrate the release of her autobiography, "Child Star." Black will be the special guest at a celebrity-packed "Thanksgiving Gala" at the Newporter Resort. On the guest list? Hold your nostalgia-loving breath.
NEWS
June 2, 1988 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
She was the No. 1 box-office star in America for four straight years during the 1930s, the dimpled darling of the Depression. But even the fabled childhood of Shirley Temple--Hollywood's most famous child star--could not be protected from such real-life intrusions as kidnap and extortion attempts, death threats and an attempted seduction by a Hollywood producer when she was only 12 years old.
NEWS
January 2, 1989 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
A youngish TV reporter settled himself opposite Shirley Temple Black in the parlor of Tournament House in Pasadena, where she was sailing cheerily through a morning of obligatory interviews, and suggested for openers, that, good grief, she'd been around forever and now she was grand marshal of the Rose Parade for the second time, after Fifty years and. . . . To which Black, who is now 60, replied, enjoying her own joke, "Yes, I'm...
OPINION
February 13, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
As an adult, Shirley Temple Black shed her signature ringlets, became a Republican fundraiser and went on to a career as a respected diplomat in the Nixon, Ford and George H.W. Bush administrations. Even her boss, Henry Kissinger, was impressed, calling her "very intelligent, very tough-minded, very disciplined. " But not all fundraisers are as able as Black, who died Monday. Consider George James Tsunis, who has been nominated by President Obama as ambassador to Norway, and Colleen Bell, Obama's pick to be ambassador to Hungary.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - - By the late 1980s, Depression-era child actress Shirley Temple Black had been retired from Hollywood for some 40 years and was nearing the end of her second career as a U.S. diplomat. But in China, her star was enjoying an improbable -- and meteoric -- rise.   After decades of isolation from the West, China had begun to open up, and on Sunday nights, families were tuning into state-run television for two special programs featuring foreign films: “Upright Theater” and “Translated Movies for TV.” Programmers, though, insisted on family-friendly fare, sans anything scandalous or political.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Christy Khoshaba
Shirley Temple Black, the dimpled curly-haired scene-stealer, warmed hearts from the start. She died this week at age 85 at her home near San Francisco, and though Temple Black went on to lead a storied life well outside Hollywood, there are still a few facts that some readers may not know. Here's a sampling: Watch out Hollywood, I'm here: At 3, Temple made her on-screen debut, but it was a strange one. She and a handful of other toddlers starred in the 1932 parody series “Baby Burlesks.” The toddlers wore diapers and barely there lingerie, playing hookers and World War I soldiers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik and Amy Kaufman
By singing and dancing into the hearts of Depression-era America, Shirley Temple opened the door for hundreds of childhood performers to follow. Yet the realm of stardom in which those young stars now find themselves couldn't be more different than the world Temple helped create. Shirley Temple Black, who died Monday at age 85, performed in dozens of movies before she even hit her teens. For several years in the 1930s she was a bigger box-office draw than any adult star of the period, a group that included Vivien Leigh and Greta Garbo, as the studio both pushed Temple to crank out movies and protected her from the scrutiny that came with it.  PHOTOS: Shirley Temple Black, 1928-2014 It is Temple's legacy that, directly or otherwise, made possible the emergence of a wide group of modern-era youthful entertainers, including Jodie Foster, Justin Bieber, Gary Coleman and Miley Cyrus, to name just a few. It is also a culture that has mutated significantly in Temple's wake - and not always for the best.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Former child star and later U.S. ambassador Shirley Temple Black died Monday at age 85. TCM plans to air a marathon of her most popular films on March 9. The marathon, which begins at 1:30 p.m. PST, begins with "Heidi," her 1937 film based on the Swiss children's story. Other films in the lineup include "Stowaway" and "Bright Eyes," the 1934 film that featured her singing "On the Good Ship Lollipop" and paved the way for Shirley Temple Development to be set up at 20th Century Fox. PHOTOS: Shirley Temple Black, 1928-2014 "The Little Princess," "I'll Be Seeing You," "A Kiss for Corliss" and "That Hagen Girl" will also be part of the marathon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | Valerie J. Nelson
Shirley Temple Black, who as the most popular child movie star of all time lifted a filmgoing nation's spirits during the Depression and then grew up to be a diplomat, has died. She was 85. Black died late Monday at her home in Woodside, Calif., according to publicist Cheryl J. Kagan. No cause was given. From 1935 through 1938, the curly-haired moppet billed as Shirley Temple was the top box-office draw in the nation. She saved what became 20th Century Fox studios from bankruptcy and made more than 40 movies before she turned 12. PHOTOS: Shirley Temple Black Hollywood recognized the enchanting, dimpled scene-stealer's importance to the industry with a “special award” -- a miniature Oscar -- at the Academy Awards for 1934, the year she sang and danced her way into America's collective heart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1998 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
So an astronaut, a filmmaker and Shirley Temple are riding together in a parade. Sound like a joke? Guess again. Tournament of Roses officials named four grand marshals Thursday to lead the 1999 Rose Parade: Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin Jr., David L. Wolper, Shirley Temple Black, and for the first time, a posthumously named marshal, baseball great Jackie Robinson. Has the parade moved to the carpool lane?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2014 | By Susan King
News of Shirley Temple Black's death Monday night brought back wonderful memories for me, of my childhood and my early love of Hollywood. Shirley Temple was one of my early obsessions. From the age of 5, I would watch and watch her movies from "Bright Eyes" to "Poor Little Rich Girl" to my favorite "The Little Princess. " My mother was my Temple enabler so to speak. She had turned on the television one Saturday afternoon when we were living in Miami to "Shirley Temple Theater," a weekly showcase of her classic films.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Shirley Temple Black's early childhood home in Santa Monica sold for its asking price of $2.489 million in less than two weeks of coming on the market. The Spanish style-house, built in 1926, features vaulted wood beam ceilings, three bedrooms, two bathrooms and 1,966 square feet of living space. The yard is planted with apricot, apple and plum trees. Black, 85, starred in such hit films as “Bright Eyes,” “Curly Top” and “Heidi” during the 1930s and won an honorary Juvenile Academy Award.
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