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February 11, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
When your previous work includes what is widely considered to be the definitive documentary on the Holocaust, how do you follow that up? French filmmaker Claude Lanzmann has returned over the years to the material that went into the making of his 9 1/2-hour 1985 landmark documentary “Shoah” and with his latest film, “The Last of the Unjust,” he again digs back into that past. “The Last of the Unjust,” playing now in Los Angeles, is based on a series of filmed interviews conducted by Lanzmann with Benjamin Murmelstein in 1975.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
When your previous work includes what is widely considered to be the definitive documentary on the Holocaust, how do you follow that up? French filmmaker Claude Lanzmann has returned over the years to the material that went into the making of his 9 1/2-hour 1985 landmark documentary “Shoah” and with his latest film, “The Last of the Unjust,” he again digs back into that past. “The Last of the Unjust,” playing now in Los Angeles, is based on a series of filmed interviews conducted by Lanzmann with Benjamin Murmelstein in 1975.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1987 | CLARKE TAYLOR
Claude Lanzmann did not initially want "Shoah," his epic-length film about the Holocaust, shown on television. "Two years ago, I would have preferred having the film seen in theaters, on a big screen, with many people gathered together to see it, but I have changed my mind," explained Lanzmann, a French journalist-turned-film maker whose critically acclaimed film begins a four-night run on the Public Broadcasting Service tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
With the ground-breaking 9½-hour "Shoah" and similar documentaries to his credit, it would be understandable if filmmaker Claude Lanzmann felt he'd spent enough time dealing with the Holocaust. But the opposite is true, with a vengeance. At age 87 Lanzmann has come out with one of his most provocative films because he felt he had no choice. The subject of "The Last of the Unjust," based on a series of interviews the director did in 1975, "continued to dwell in my mind and haunt me," Lanzmann has written.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1986 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Editor's note: For the benefit of Orange County audiences, the following is a repeat of the movie review that appeared in The Times on Dec. 27, 1985, when "Shoah" opened in Los Angeles. With his 9 1/2-hour "Shoah," Claude Lanzmann has accomplished the seemingly impossible: He has brought such beauty to his recounting of the horror of the Holocaust that he has made it accessible and comprehensible. "Shoah" opens at the Balboa Cinema in Newport Beach today. The film is in two parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1986 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
Over the past two weeks, more than 3,000 people in Orange County paid between $15 and $20 each to see "Shoah," a very long film about a very grim subject. According to Eric Levin, manager of the Balboa Cinema, the response to the nine-day run, which ended Thursday, was "exactly what we expected." Levin admitted that there had been some doubt by the distributer-New Yorker Films--that the highly praised exploration of the Holocaust would draw at the Newport Beach theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
With the ground-breaking 9½-hour "Shoah" and similar documentaries to his credit, it would be understandable if filmmaker Claude Lanzmann felt he'd spent enough time dealing with the Holocaust. But the opposite is true, with a vengeance. At age 87 Lanzmann has come out with one of his most provocative films because he felt he had no choice. The subject of "The Last of the Unjust," based on a series of interviews the director did in 1975, "continued to dwell in my mind and haunt me," Lanzmann has written.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1986 | Judy Stone
Only about 2,000 West Germans got a chance to see "Shoah," the 9 1/2-hour documentary on the wartime extermination of European Jews, at the Berlin Film Festival. But millions more will get a chance to see it on West German TV this week in prime time--except for the residents of Bavaria, where Hitler got his start. Although "Shoah" has won unanimous praise in the German press, Bavarian television officials at first refused to program the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1987 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Television drama has never found the right language for the Holocaust, perhaps because that language doesn't exist. Dramatists have had their crack. Stories recalling Nazi atrocities during World War II come and go, some of them even high-minded, yet by sheer weight and numbers seeming almost to desensitize as they commemorate. Even the better ones, such as the recent "Escape From Sobibor" on CBS, fall short.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1986 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
When Claude Lanzmann's 9 1/2-hour epic "Shoah" opens today at the Balboa Cinema in Newport Beach, Orange County audiences will finally be able to see the French journalist's acclaimed documentary about the Holocaust. Culled from 350 hours of filmed interviews with survivors of Nazi death camps, "Shoah" represents an unprecedented cinematic undertaking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2013 | By Nita Lelyveld
They started by videotaping one Holocaust survivor's story. Then came another and another. Nearly 20 years have passed, and the stories have added up - to almost 52,000 eyewitness accounts collected all over the world. Each month, the USC Shoah Foundation gives a public tour to talk about the collection and how it is being used. People gather in the lobby, where a collage of faces stripes the walls beneath the words: "Every survivor has a story to tell. " On a recent morning, an elegant 91-year-old woman sat on a couch beneath that message, waiting for the tour to begin.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2012
It's a wrap for the Shoah Foundation Institute's ambitious, 18-year project to gather and preserve testimonies from more than 52,000 Holocaust survivors and witnesses. The foundation, established in 1994 by Steven Spielberg following his making of the movie "Schindler's List," announced Monday that the last interview -- with Hungarian survivor Feher Istvan -- was digitized June 20 and will soon be available to view online, alongside 105,000 hours of oral history from the Jewish Holocaust.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2009 | Joanna Lin
Fifteen years ago, nearly 52,000 Holocaust survivors and witnesses began sharing their stories with a group that would come to be known as the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education. The testimonies, averaging about two hours each, were documented on videotape, a format whose quality deteriorates over time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2005 | Steven Barrie-Anthony, Times Staff Writer
Steven Spielberg would be there. That's all USC freshman Jason Zeldez needed to know. He and a fellow cinema major hiked across campus Thursday to wait in line outside Bovard Auditorium. "I don't really know what this is about," Zeldez said. "The Shoah Foundation? I'm not really sure what that is."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2005 | Monte Morin, Times Staff Writer
The Shoah Foundation, a repository of Holocaust testimonials established by filmmaker Steven Spielberg, will become part of USC's College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, officials announced Friday. Under an agreement between the university and the Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation, the repository of 52,000 testimonials from Holocaust survivors and witnesses will be transferred to USC in perpetuity Jan. 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2005 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
California may be the bluest of states, but at an event on the Universal Studios back lot not long ago, everything was bathed in a warm pink light. It brought back days when the country seemed less divided, both color-wise and otherwise, which certainly gave the guest of honor his hue.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1985 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
With his 9 1/2-hour "Shoah," Claude Lanzmann has accomplished the seemingly impossible: He has brought such beauty to his recounting of the horror of the Holocaust that he has made it accessible and comprehensible. ("Shoah" is in two parts. Part I screens at the Goldwyn Pavilion Cinemas daily at 1:30 and 7:30 p.m. and will continue screening at those times when Part II opens next Friday, screening daily at 1 and 7 p.m. Separate admission is necessary for each part.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2012
It's a wrap for the Shoah Foundation Institute's ambitious, 18-year project to gather and preserve testimonies from more than 52,000 Holocaust survivors and witnesses. The foundation, established in 1994 by Steven Spielberg following his making of the movie "Schindler's List," announced Monday that the last interview -- with Hungarian survivor Feher Istvan -- was digitized June 20 and will soon be available to view online, alongside 105,000 hours of oral history from the Jewish Holocaust.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a rainy October morning in 1938, Hanna Bloch stands on the sidewalk, crying softly as a bus departs Prague. She is just 19. As she watches her sweetheart Walter Kohner, 24, disappear in the distance, she cherishes their last embrace. Swastikas had been appearing in nearby towns, including Teplitz-Schoenau, where Hanna and Walter had fallen in love. But now he is leaving. He has an American visa--and plans to go to Hollywood, become an actor and arrange for Hanna to join him.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With his 9 1/2-hour "Shoah," Claude Lanzmann accomplished the seemingly impossible: He brought such beauty to his recounting of the horror of the Holocaust that he made it accessible and comprehensible. Rarely screened because of its formidable length, the monumental 1985 film will be the final offering in the American Cinematheque's "Really Long Film Series" at Raleigh Studios. Part I screens Saturday at 7:15 p.m., and Part II Sunday at 6:15 p.m.
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