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Shoal Creek Country Club

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SPORTS
June 22, 1990 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a public relations nightmare, the Professional Golfers' Assn. of America moved quickly Thursday to distance itself from a growing racial controversy at Shoal Creek Country Club, site of the 1990 PGA Championship. For the second time in the last six years, the prestigious tournament--one of four major golf events--returns to the Shoal Creek course, near Birmingham, Ala. This time, however, questions have been raised concerning the club's longstanding refusal to allow blacks as members.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2010
Hall Thompson Businessman helped build Shoal Creek Country Club Hall Thompson, 87, a prominent Alabama business leader who developed Shoal Creek Country Club but sparked controversy two decades ago with comments about the admission of blacks as members, died Wednesday, according to officials at the club in Shelby County, south of Birmingham, Ala. The cause of death was not given. In 1957 he founded Thompson Tractor Co., which became one of the leading companies of its kind.
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SPORTS
June 30, 1990
It was with great distress that I read how easily Andy O'Brien of the PGA dismissed the issue of the no-blacks-allowed policy of the Shoal Creek Country Club, where the 1990 PGA Championship will be held. By ignoring this type of behavior and conducting business as usual, the PGA is, in effect, condoning this type of racism. ROD PATTERSON Riverside
SPORTS
February 22, 1991 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the surface, everything had seemed OK. Calvin Peete had always been able to play on any golf course where the PGA Tour stopped. None of the professional players had ever been denied access to a locker room. No fan had ever been turned away because of color. "So it was a slap in the face to us when the Shoal Creek situation happened," said Sid Wilson, director of public relations for the PGA Tour. "But as our commissioner said, it wasn't a tough decision for us to make, at all.
SPORTS
August 18, 1990
Want to know one of the reasons why racism is still alive and well in this great country of ours? Just read the following quotes from some of our fellow American golf pros regarding the membership policies of the Shoal Creek Country Club. Hale Irwin: "I have no comment. Next question." Payne Stewart: "I play golf. I don't make policy." Jack Nicklaus: "Old news as far as I'm concerned. We have talked enough about it." I wonder what our country would be like if everyone adopted this "Hear no evil, see no evil, speak no evil" attitude.
SPORTS
July 28, 1990
Another sponsor, American Honda Motor Co., has withdrawn its television commercials from the PGA Championship because the host Shoal Creek Country Club has no black members. ABC said its lost ad revenue is nearing $2 million. Earlier, Toyota, IBM, Anheuser-Busch and Lincoln-Mercury said they were dropping plans to run commercials either on ABC, which will televise the final two rounds; or ESPN, which will cover the first two. Delta Airlines said it would reduce its commercial involvement.
SPORTS
July 27, 1990 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI
Despite assurances that Shoal Creek Country Club, site of next month's PGA Championship, could soon include black members, tournament organizers remain fearful of demonstrations and continued advertising backlash. Birmingham, Ala., Mayor Richard Arrington, who is black, received a pledge from the club's board of governors that blacks would be actively recruited and possibly approved for membership within the year. Arrington pleaded Thursday with organizers of a planned protest to reconsider.
SPORTS
August 18, 1990
Want to know one of the reasons why racism is still alive and well in this great country of ours? Just read the following quotes from some of our fellow American golf pros regarding the membership policies of the Shoal Creek Country Club. Hale Irwin: "I have no comment. Next question." Payne Stewart: "I play golf. I don't make policy." Jack Nicklaus: "Old news as far as I'm concerned. We have talked enough about it." I wonder what our country would be like if everyone adopted this "Hear no evil, see no evil, speak no evil" attitude.
SPORTS
August 13, 1990 | Associated Press
Shoal Creek, at the center of the racial controversary that led to a change in the way future tournament sites will be selected, has bid to be the host of the 1996 U.S. Open. "They're not the only club that's asked for that year," Robert T. Sommers, U.S. Golf Assn. official, said Sunday, but did not reveal the other clubs.
SPORTS
August 12, 1990 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he was 2, Frederick Chew III was given a set of miniature golf clubs and plastic balls. The back yard became his driving range, the living room rug his putting green. Chew, a small, delicate child, whacked each ball until it was lost. That done, he started hitting marbles. When he was 5, Chew, using a set of mix-and-match clubs bought at the local Goodwill for $3 and cut down at a hardware store, finished last in his first tournament.
SPORTS
August 9, 1990 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nick Faldo could win his third major golf tournament of the year, Greg Norman could win his second ever. Jack Nicklaus could win on a course he designed, Payne Stewart could defend a title. Tom Kite could add to his record $6 million in career earnings, Hale Irwin could continue his middle-age renaissance. And no one will remember. At least, not at first they won't. Much against its will, the 1990 PGA Championship at Shoal Creek has become a poster child for social reform.
OPINION
August 5, 1990
Each victory in the battle against bigotry deserves applause, regardless of the motive for the step forward. Shoal Creek Country Club, a restrictive golf course where this weekend's Professional Golfers' Assn. championship is being played, has announced plans to admit its first African-American members. Several other whites-only country clubs that host prestigious tournaments are moving to do the same.
OPINION
August 5, 1990
Each victory in the battle against bigotry deserves applause, regardless of the motive for the step forward. Shoal Creek Country Club, a restrictive golf course where this weekend's Professional Golfers' Assn. championship is being played, has announced plans to admit its first African-American members. Several other whites-only country clubs that host prestigious tournaments are moving to do the same.
SPORTS
July 31, 1990 | LARRY STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NBC-owned Channel 4, in protest of Shoal Creek Country Club's all-white membership policy, has announced that although it will report the results, it will not show highlights of the ABC-televised PGA Championship, to be played Aug. 9-12 at the suburban Birmingham (Ala.) country club. ABC-owned Channel 7 has not set any policy, but sportscaster Jim Hill, who is black, spoke out Monday against Shoal Creek's policy. "Disgusting is the word for it," Hill said.
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