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Shobha De

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April 1, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And now this from India's "Queen of Porn," the first woman author here to use "the F-word," as she calls it, in print: "The way my day and my life is structured, it's all with kids!" "With kids and kids and kids," says Shobha De. "And, you know, their days, their tennis, their pianos, their birthdays, their school schedules, their clothes. . . ." Is this "the Jackie Collins of India," as her critics and even her publisher have dubbed her?
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NEWS
April 1, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And now this from India's "Queen of Porn," the first woman author here to use "the F-word," as she calls it, in print: "The way my day and my life is structured, it's all with kids!" "With kids and kids and kids," says Shobha De. "And, you know, their days, their tennis, their pianos, their birthdays, their school schedules, their clothes. . . ." Is this "the Jackie Collins of India," as her critics and even her publisher have dubbed her?
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WORLD
March 10, 2012 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
  Stay-at-home mom Swati Rastogi watched her daughter Krisha play with plastic monkeys as son Dhruva lined up model cars in their two-bedroom apartment surrounded by Hindi and English alphabet posters. Dhruva, 3, asked whether Pakistan is part of India. He was informed that it's not. "I don't know where that comes from," she said, watching attentively. That's a rarity for Rastogi, who leaves little to chance when it comes to her children's education. Although China and its diaspora receive lots of attention for hyper-parenting since last year's publication of the book "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother," Indians aren't exactly wallflowers in the child-rearing department.
WORLD
October 26, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
The world's newest Grand Prix racetrack, a state-of-the-art complex just outside New Delhi, showcases the brash, high-octane pride of India as it muscles onto the global stage with world-class airports, an ambitious space program and the planet's first billion-dollar home. But just beyond the gleaming track, vestiges of age-old India remain: villages without paved roads, schools without books and legions of people scratching out a meager living. Near the track's VIP entrance this week, just a few days before Sunday's debut race, a corpse was being burned in a modest stone crematory.
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