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Shock Radio

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BUSINESS
September 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Federal Communications Commission chairman urged the nation's broadcasters today to tune out "shock radio," programs that use sexually and racially oriented humor to attract audiences. "We are not simply recorders, transmitters and antennas," Alfred Sikes told those attending the National Assn. of Broadcasters radio convention. "We are what we broadcast."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2002 | Steve Harvey
The police log of the Los Alamitos News-Enterprise reported that a resident heard a neighbor's child "screaming for 30 minutes." A check revealed that the disturbance actually was "several infants crying at a 1-year-old's birthday party." Bunch of party-poopers, no doubt. Talk about a tight real estate market: Ronald Ballew of Long Beach saw an ad for what must be the most luxurious pay toilet in town (see photo). I'd like to know more about the "secure parking." Speaking of parking: Maureen McConaghy spotted an area that's obviously reserved for patients who have insurance (see photo)
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1987 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
When J. C. Corcoran arrived in St. Louis as the new morning deejay on rock station KSHE-FM, management asked him to appear at several fund-raising activities for local charities. He immediately refused. "I said to them, 'You guys are missing the point. We have to make people think I'm some kind of wild man, you know, like I'm satanic or something.' "When I'm off the air, I'm a very straight, boring homebody," Corcoran explained. "But when I'm on the air, my mission is to be very crazy."
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | ERIN TEXEIRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Harvey is preaching. Preaching to a caller, a girl with a tiny voice talking on live radio at KKBT-FM, the station that calls itself The Beat. She has phoned to compliment Harvey's morning program, but he brushes her off. How old are you? he demands. Why aren't you in school? "I got kicked out of Henry Clay Junior High last week," says the 12-year-old caller, D'Angela. She had violated the campus dress code.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1987 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
"Willard Wizeman" continued to perform his comic routine that includes the sound of him unzipping his pants on the Rick Dees radio show on KIIS-FM (102.7) this week, despite the stern warnings against the broadcasting of potentially offensive material recently handed down by the Federal Communications Commission. "It would be terrible to zip him up for good," Dees said of his notoriously rude character.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | ERIN TEXEIRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Harvey is preaching. Preaching to a caller, a girl with a tiny voice talking on live radio at KKBT-FM, the station that calls itself The Beat. She has phoned to compliment Harvey's morning program, but he brushes her off. How old are you? he demands. Why aren't you in school? "I got kicked out of Henry Clay Junior High last week," says the 12-year-old caller, D'Angela. She had violated the campus dress code.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1989 | Dennis McDougalD and DR, Radio
"What is the most disgusting thing that you have ever put into your mouth?" might not be the preferred topic of discussion around the Christmas dinner table or even in the locker room at the YMCA, but it did mark one of the nadir's in radio broadcasting during the '80s. KFI-AM's Tom Leykis, an itinerant talk show host who has done stints in Phoenix and Miami before landing in Los Angeles two years ago, assumed the dubious distinction of being the first talk show host in decades to get his station fined by the Federal Communications Commission for indecent programming.
SPORTS
December 19, 1997 | LARRY STEWART
Figuring out exactly what Sports Radio AM 1150 is has been difficult. Is it an adults-only, X-rated station or is it an all-sports station that caters to family entertainment such as Dodger baseball and UCLA sports? Another problem is the call letters. Since its start in March, it has gone from KIIS-AM 1150 to XTRA 1150 to KXTA 1150 to the name it now prefers, Sports Radio AM 1150. No wonder it never shows up in the ratings book.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1987
Shock Radio??? Shock Radio is just the most obvious example of how low the standards of American contemporary radio have sunk ("Shock Radio," by Patrick Goldstein, Feb. 22). As a broadcaster with quite a few years of local experience, I'd like to offer the opinion that L.A. radio just about leads the way in setting new lows. This used to be a great market for Top 40 and AOR stations. KHJ, KRLA, KMET, KPPC, Morgan, Steele, the Rabbit, B.M.R., Mintz and on and on. Class, integrity, honesty.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1987
WAIT! There's been a terrible mistake made! In the Feb. 22 Calendar, someone slipped in the "tasteful" copy apparently intended for the conservative Boston Globe or Salt Lake Tribune. How else could one explain an article on "Shock Radio" that was virtually devoid of any graphic examples of such? The ersatz Calendar that was bogusly planted in my Times defended its Puritanical publishing peccadilloes by stating it "couldn't find any safe, PG-rated examples to publish for this survey.
SPORTS
December 19, 1997 | LARRY STEWART
Figuring out exactly what Sports Radio AM 1150 is has been difficult. Is it an adults-only, X-rated station or is it an all-sports station that caters to family entertainment such as Dodger baseball and UCLA sports? Another problem is the call letters. Since its start in March, it has gone from KIIS-AM 1150 to XTRA 1150 to KXTA 1150 to the name it now prefers, Sports Radio AM 1150. No wonder it never shows up in the ratings book.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1996 | Verne Gay, Verne Gay writes about television for Newsday
The lion's den is not such a terrible place at all. It is almost erudite, really, more like the sanctum sanctorum of a stern but imminently respectable professor than the warren of a notorious radio talk show host. The walls are dark burnished wood, and from ceiling to floor shelves are crammed with hundreds of books, mostly nonfiction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1993 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He came to town and they came from far and wide to pay homage. They slept in the streets, braving near-freezing temperatures. Mothers kept their children out of school. Postal workers left overflowing sacks of Christmas mail undelivered. One surgeon abandoned his patients. No, it wasn't President Clinton they had come to pay tribute to. Nor was it an early sighting of Santa Claus. It wasn't even a once-in-a-decade papal visit, although some would argue it was indeed a religious experience.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1993 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The self-proclaimed "king of all media" has issued a new proclamation: West Hollywood is out and Pasadena is in. The publicity-seeker in question is Howard Stern, the top-rated, raunchy morning radio personality, and the cities were the former and current sites for his much-hyped book signings. On Thursday, the radio personality will autograph his best-selling book, "Private Parts," at Vroman's bookstore in Pasadena after a contentious battle with the city of West Hollywood, where Book Soup is located.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1993 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The admission by a station executive that Howard Stern's racy morning show is being systematically edited by KLSX-FM (97.1) has produced a flurry of negative reaction, even from those who would like to see the so-called "shock jock" taken off the air. Legal experts say the station's action is a classic case of the "chilling effect" that government regulation can have on free speech. Stern fans are angry that they aren't getting to listen to his comic antics in their entirety.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1990
A jury ordered a radio station and two disc jockeys to pay $694,200 in damages to a news director they referred to with risque jokes on a "shock radio" program. Liz Randolph, 32, claimed the jokes, which implied she was promiscuous and mentally unstable, caused her to suffer panic attacks and led her to seek psychiatric treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1990
A jury ordered a radio station and two disc jockeys to pay $694,200 in damages to a news director they referred to with risque jokes on a "shock radio" program. Liz Randolph, 32, claimed the jokes, which implied she was promiscuous and mentally unstable, caused her to suffer panic attacks and led her to seek psychiatric treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1989 | Dennis McDougalD and DR, Radio
"What is the most disgusting thing that you have ever put into your mouth?" might not be the preferred topic of discussion around the Christmas dinner table or even in the locker room at the YMCA, but it did mark one of the nadir's in radio broadcasting during the '80s. KFI-AM's Tom Leykis, an itinerant talk show host who has done stints in Phoenix and Miami before landing in Los Angeles two years ago, assumed the dubious distinction of being the first talk show host in decades to get his station fined by the Federal Communications Commission for indecent programming.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1989 | From Associated Press
The National Assn. of Broadcasters, responding to a federal regulator's suggestion to curb "shock radio," said Thursday that it is considering reviving radio and TV program codes that were dropped under government pressure in the 1970s. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Alfred Sikes, in an address to a radio broadcasters' convention in New Orleans last week, urged radio executives to tune out "shock radio" programs that use sexually and racially oriented humor to attract audiences.
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