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Shock Waves

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2014 | By Seema Mehta, Abby Sewell and Jack Leonard
Sheriff Lee Baca's surprise retirement prompted two parallel furors on Tuesday - among county leaders, who must quickly pick an interim replacement, and among potential candidates who are reassessing a field that was dramatically altered by the departure of the 15-year incumbent. Los Angeles County supervisors were preparing Tuesday afternoon to meet in private to begin discussions to pick an interim sheriff. Early support appeared to be building around Terri McDonald, a well-regarded assistant sheriff who was brought in from the state prison system to reform the county's troubled jails.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2014 | By Seema Mehta, Abby Sewell and Jack Leonard
Sheriff Lee Baca's surprise retirement prompted two parallel furors on Tuesday - among county leaders, who must quickly pick an interim replacement, and among potential candidates who are reassessing a field that was dramatically altered by the departure of the 15-year incumbent. Los Angeles County supervisors were preparing Tuesday afternoon to meet in private to begin discussions to pick an interim sheriff. Early support appeared to be building around Terri McDonald, a well-regarded assistant sheriff who was brought in from the state prison system to reform the county's troubled jails.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2005
If the wedding between two celebs can cause "shock waves," as Calendar's front page states ["A Couple of Young Pop Stars in Love," by Geoff Boucher, May 14], Americans are going to hell in a basket. Why are no shock waves caused by the mass murder of innocent people in Darfur? Why is no one marching to stop the madness in Iraq? So long as we are preoccupied with the petty lives of petty people whose only claim to fame is plastic surgery and a decadent lifestyle -- this is the beginning of the end. Nero fiddles while Rome is burning.
WORLD
August 5, 2013 | By Kathleen McLaughlin, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details
BEIJING -- Revelations by a New Zealand dairy company that its exports could contain toxic bacteria have sent shock waves across Asia -- perhaps nowhere more so than in China, where officials announced a recall of potentially tainted powdered milk over the weekend. The news has shaken Chinese parents, who have grown to trust foreign formula brands over anything produced locally. Thousands of Chinese babies were sickened and several died in 2008 after drinking domestically produced formula that had been spiked with melamine , a compound used in making plastics that allowed watered-down milk to pass quality tests.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2002 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If Paavali Jumppanen was aiming to make an especially splashy impression in his California debut at Schoenberg Hall Sunday afternoon, he succeeded. The sandy-haired, 27-year-old Finnish pianist clearly has stupendous technical ability and the stamina of a heavyweight champion, taking on and conquering Rachmaninoff's finger-smashing Etudes-Tableaux, Opus 39--not just one or two (that would have been taxing enough), but all nine of them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
A powerful blast of shock waves can smash gallstones inside the body and may someday replace surgery for more than 100,000 Americans each year, experts reported. The procedure, called lithotripsy, has already become the standard treatment for kidney stones. Research published in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that it will also be useful for many people with gallstones, which are four times more common.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The unexpected victory of an Islamic fundamentalist party in Algerian elections sent shock waves Wednesday throughout a political establishment in France that still has strong cultural and emotional ties to the former French colony.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1989 | From Financial Times
The sharp devaluation of the Venezuelan bolivar decreed last week by the government of President Carlos Andres Perez is sending shock waves through the economy, which relies heavily on imports. Prices for many goods and services are rising steeply, and the economy will most likely suffer a substantial contraction this year, after registering a 4.2% increase in gross domestic product in 1988.
NEWS
October 9, 1985 | GARY LIBMAN, Times Staff Writer
When outfielder Joe Jackson and seven other Chicago White Sox were accused of throwing the 1919 World Series, a youngster is said to have tearfully tugged at Jackson's sleeve, begging, "Say it ain't so, Joe." The players were branded "The Black Sox" and banned from baseball in a scandal that shocked American children and grown-ups too, according to Eliot Asinof, author of a detailed study of the event called "Eight Men Out."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2009 | David Pagel
About 15 years ago, Philip Argent helped put L.A. painting in the spotlight by making Hard-Edge Abstraction look as sexy and progressive as it did in its heyday, when Karl Benjamin, Frederick Hammersley, John McLaughlin and their cohorts invented the hip, optimistic style in the 1950s. Argent brought the laser-sharp contours and screaming colors of their abstract compositions into the Digital Age, transforming organic shapes and pulsating patterns into supersaturated images fueled by computer technology and animated by the possibilities of instantaneous communication.
SPORTS
June 30, 2013 | Helene Elliott
WIMBLEDON, England - Surely, someone made a mistake. The intended order of play for the round of 16 at Wimbledon on Monday omitted seven-time champion Roger Federer and two-time champion Rafael Nadal. World No. 3 Maria Sharapova and two-time Australian Open winner Victoria Azarenka were missing too. Surprisingly, there was no error. A run of first-week injuries and upsets turned Wimbledon on its genteel ear and ushered out Federer, Nadal, Sharapova, Azarenka and other headliners.
WORLD
February 15, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Monte Morin, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Without warning, a celestial object that NASA described as a "tiny asteroid" streaked above Russia's Ural Mountains early Friday before exploding, creating a shock wave that rattled buildings, shattered glass and injured hundreds of people. Many witnesses in Chelyabinsk said they saw a white trail across the sky and a bright flash and heard a loud explosion seconds before buildings in the eastern part of the city were jolted. Scientists said it was the largest such event in more than a century, since a blast that leveled 800 square miles of forest in 1908, the so-called Tunguska event, also in Siberia.
WORLD
July 12, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
President Hamid Karzai's powerful and controversial half brother, Ahmed Wali Karzai, was shot and killed Tuesday by a senior member of his police security detail — an assassination that could set off a chaotic power struggle in a province considered key to Western military efforts. Ahmed Wali Karzai was the undisputed kingmaker of Kandahar province, the ancestral home of the Karzai clan, and word of his death sent shock waves through the province and Afghanistan's wider political world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Thomas J. Ahrens, a Caltech geophysicist who pioneered the academic use of shock waves to study minerals under high temperatures and pressures such as those found at the center of the Earth, died Nov. 24 at his home in Pasadena. He was 74. The cause of death was not revealed. Today, physicists have several ways to look at materials under high pressures and temperatures. Diamond anvils can be used to exert very high pressures on minerals, and lasers are used to heat them to extreme temperatures.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2009 | David Pagel
About 15 years ago, Philip Argent helped put L.A. painting in the spotlight by making Hard-Edge Abstraction look as sexy and progressive as it did in its heyday, when Karl Benjamin, Frederick Hammersley, John McLaughlin and their cohorts invented the hip, optimistic style in the 1950s. Argent brought the laser-sharp contours and screaming colors of their abstract compositions into the Digital Age, transforming organic shapes and pulsating patterns into supersaturated images fueled by computer technology and animated by the possibilities of instantaneous communication.
NATIONAL
March 31, 2009 | P.J. Huffstutter and Ralph Vartabedian
From the sprawling General Motors transmission plant in Ypsilanti Township, Dave Tatman said that when he heard the bad news about his company and the departure Monday of its chief executive, Rick Wagoner, it came "like a hammer blow to the stomach." Tatman has been a General Motors man all his life. When he got out of college, he dreamed about one day being a plant manager for GM.
NEWS
April 1, 1989 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
The scientist whose name is mentioned these days with Edison and Einstein came to his front door in a rugby shirt, stocking feet and bad mood. "I can't find my slides," B. Stanley Pons snapped. Yes, the slides were missing, the ones Pons had used to illustrate nuclear fusion.
NEWS
June 1, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIME STAFF WRITER
There was little to prepare this land of volcanic peaks and sand-swept villages, once the arid domain of the Queen of Sheba, to lead Arabia on the road to democracy. The narrow streets are still filled with men who thrust curved daggers in their belts. The tribes of the north even now wage occasional conquests from hill to rocky hill. Ancient dhows still call on the busy seaport of Aden.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2008 | Raja Abdulrahim, Abdulrahim is a Times staff writer.
Bharat Shetty sat in the Kabob Corner restaurant in Artesia on Wednesday and watched the Taj Mahal Palace hotel in Mumbai burn. "This place is so beautiful," he said, as he watched CNN footage of the terrorist attacks that killed at least 78 people and injured more than 200 others. "When we were in college we used to go hang out there. There was a disco on top."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2008 | David Pierson, Times Staff Writer
Xiao Xuemei received a phone call at 2 a.m. Monday from a friend in her home city of Chengdu telling her that a massive earthquake had struck Sichuan province, killing thousands. Xiao, a waitress at a Sichuanese restaurant in Alhambra, panicked and immediately started calling family members there on their cellphones to make sure they were safe. "I couldn't get through," said Xiao, 50. "There was no connection." Luckily, Xiao received another call from Chengdu a few hours later.
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