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Shoe Industry

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BUSINESS
July 24, 1995 | DAN MARGOLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tony Adams Jr. was a shoe manufacturer with a problem. His family-owned business, Cypress Footwear Inc., was getting kicked around in the highly competitive footwear market. It expanded from sandals into walking shoes a few years ago and that helped a bit, but the family still found it tough to go head-to-head against foreign competitors. He needed a new line.
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BUSINESS
December 8, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Heelys Inc., the novelty shoemaker that has equipped thousands of children around the world with wheeled sneakers, raised $134.9 million in an initial public offering Thursday, 20% more than it planned. The company and its shareholders sold 6.43 million shares for $21 each, more than the 6.25 million shares it expected to sell at $16 to $18 each, people familiar with the sale said. Heelys is expected to begin trading today under the ticker HLYS.
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BUSINESS
May 23, 1985
The U.S. International Trade Commission said the industry is facing a serious threat from importers. The unanimous commission finding is a reversal of a ruling 11 months ago in which the five-member body concluded that problems among U.S. shoemakers were not due primarily to imports. Commissioner after commissioner cited new statistics showing a sharp jump from 1983 to 1984 in the U.S. market share held by foreign makers in justifying their vote.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2001 | STEVE JAMES, REUTERS
The only fashion statement shoe designer Steve Madden is likely to make in the next few years will be whether he uses twin-needle pin tucking or free-motion stitching for the mailbags he could end up piecing together in prison. Or maybe which orange jumper he'll wear to the dining hall. But what of the trendy footwear company that bears his name? How will it carry on while its founder, former chief executive and creative force sits behind bars? Business school experts said Steven Madden Ltd.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1990 | TOM REDBURN
The House failed to override President Bush's veto of legislation to protect the textile and shoe industries from imports. The 275-152 tally, which fell 12 votes short of the two-thirds necessary to overturn the veto, kills the bill for the year. The Bush Administration said the bill, if enacted into law, would undermine the global trade liberalization talks scheduled to be completed this year.
BUSINESS
August 14, 1997 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High-tech eye-wear manufacturer Oakley Inc. on Wednesday took aim at sports apparel powerhouse Nike Inc. by announcing plans to enter the hotly competitive athletic footwear industry. Oakley, best known for cutting-edge sunglasses sported by the likes of NBA superstar Michael Jordan, said it will begin production next year of footwear now being tested by various athletes.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1994 | GREG JOHNSON
There's no need to sell Brother Sebastian Tobin on the health and style benefits of sandals. The 56-year-old Franciscan spends his days at a workbench in New York City's St. Francis of Assisi Parish, where he handcrafts leather sandals for church and lay customers. "I don't know how many pairs I make a year," Tobin said. "All I know is that I'm about six months behind on orders. There are only a handful of people who do what I do."
BUSINESS
July 28, 1985
President Reagan opened a can of worms that could prove to be very troublesome when he instituted quotas on the import of Japanese cars in 1981 to help the auto industry out of economic difficulties. Although he recently canceled this form of artificial protection for American-built cars, the aftereffects are beginning to be felt. Aside from the fact that during the four-year period quotas were in effect car buyers had to shell out more than $15 billion in added costs for new cars, more and more companies are calling for quotas as a means of economic aid during difficult times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1985
A year ago, the U.S. International Trade Commission unanimously rejected a claim by the domestic shoe industry that it was being unduly harmed by footwear imports. Now, under strong political pressure from Congress and with a liberalized legislative interpretation of what constitutes harm, the commission has reversed itself. On a 4-1 vote, it has called on President Reagan to impose quotas on shoe imports for the next five years. Adoption of this proposal would cost consumers plenty.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1985
I hope that President Reagan has good taste in shoes. Regarding the "Shoes Quotas a Costly Idea to Save Jobs" (June 17), it is economically unrealistic for an American to have to pay twice as much for shoes if the International Trade Commission's "novel import quota idea for the shoe industry" is adopted, for the United States to spend $50,000 to $80,000 to save each employee's $14,000 average wage, and to have the U.S. Customs Service or another agency...
BUSINESS
May 30, 2001 | SARAH HALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Athletic shoemaker K-Swiss Inc., known for its canvas and leather tennis shoes, announced plans Tuesday to branch into the adventure-oriented market, producing and distributing a collection of National Geographic-licensed footwear. After months of negotiations, the company formed a joint venture with footwear designer Rugged Shark of Lighthouse Point, Fla., to launch a full-scale line of outdoor and casual men's, women's and children's shoes.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2000 | MARK ASHER and JOSH BARR, WASHINGTON POST
Nike, one of the nation's leaders in outfitting college sports teams and manufacturing licensed apparel with university and team logos, and its chairman, Phil Knight, have withdrawn millions of dollars in financial support from three universities in the last three weeks.
NEWS
December 10, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imelda Marcos' 3,000 pairs of shoes may have been an international joke, but here in the shoe-making capital of the Philippines they're no laughing matter. The former first lady, city officials say, put Marikina on the global map. Within the next month or two, Marikina will formally say "thank you" to Marcos.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1999 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pierre Andre Senizergues is so absorbed with skateboarding that even a piece of furniture can make him think of the sport. "I like that curve," said Senizergues, the founder of Sole Technology Inc., brushing past the sleek 1950s-style couch in his office on his way to lunch. "It gives the feel of movement. And it has that gray color that makes you think of asphalt." Senizergues, a former world champion skateboarder, clearly has skateboarding on the brain.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1998 | LESLIE EARNEST, Leslie Earnest covers retail businesses and restaurants for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-7832 and at leslie.earnest@latimes.com
Oakley is trying to sell its new shoes in a difficult market. The Athletic Footwear Assn. in Florida says the number of pairs of athletic shoes purchased in the first six months of this year dropped 3.6% to 154.5 million pairs, compared to 160.2 million during the first half of last year. Total spending, however, dipped only 0.5%, because the shoes that sold were more expensive.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1998 | Bloomberg News
The Dallas Cowboys and the National Football League's marketing arm sued Converse Inc., the latest twist in a four-year battle over the use of star logos on athletic shoes. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Dallas, asks a federal judge to declare that the team can continue to license its logo to shoe companies without infringing Converse's trademark, which also uses a star design on shoes such as its Converse All-Stars.
NEWS
August 29, 1985 | KAREN TUMULTY and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan, setting a collision course with an increasingly protectionist Congress, Wednesday rejected proposed import quotas aimed at sheltering the import-battered shoe industry. The decision on whether to restrict shoe imports has been viewed as a key test of how firmly committed to its free-trade policies the Administration would remain in the face of a record trade deficit expected to hit $150 billion this year.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1998 | SUZANNE KAPNER, THESTREET.COM
It was about this time last year that the underpinnings of the athletic shoe market came undone. Kids, tired of paying more than a hundred bucks for what they considered over-hyped sneakers, began flirting with alternatives. Styles from hiking boots like Lugz to anti-establishment brands like Vans gained popularity, while Nike, which had a lock on hot shoes for the early part of the decade, watched as its basketball sneakers sat on retailers' shelves.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1998 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sneaker business has been on loose footing for a year now, but athletic-shoe retailer Just for Feet Inc. keeps sprinting ahead with aggressive expansion plans--and Wall Street likes what it sees. Indeed, stock in the Birmingham, Ala.-based chain hit a 52-week high this week of $28.94 in Nasdaq trading.
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