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BUSINESS
March 8, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Vans Inc. said Tuesday it has laid off 380 workers at its two factories in Southern California and Teamsters Union representatives complained that the employees likely were those who favor union representation at the company's plants in Orange and Vista. Christopher Staff, president of the Orange-based casual shoe company, disputed the union's allegations, maintaining that the workers were let go because more of the company's shoes are being produced at manufacturing facilities abroad.
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BUSINESS
October 30, 1997 | Reuters
Fifteen U.S. women's groups, author Alice Walker and U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles), who heads the Congressional Black Caucus, joined forces to put pressure on Nike Inc. to improve conditions for its workers in Asia. The groups on Monday took issue with Nike's latest advertising campaign, which features women empowered by athletics, saying Nike's treatment of Asian factory workers--most of whom are young women--must improve if U.S. women are to buy Nike products in good conscience.
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BUSINESS
September 23, 1997 | From Associated Press
Nike announced Monday it is cutting ties with four Indonesian companies, saying they refused to comply with its standards for wage levels and working conditions. The announcement at its annual shareholders meeting came amid claims the Beaverton, Ore.-based athletic shoe and sports apparel giant keeps many of the 500,000 workers who assemble Nike products in Asia in sweatshop conditions.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1997 | From Associated Press
Nike announced Monday it is cutting ties with four Indonesian companies, saying they refused to comply with its standards for wage levels and working conditions. The announcement at its annual shareholders meeting came amid claims the Beaverton, Ore.-based athletic shoe and sports apparel giant keeps many of the 500,000 workers who assemble Nike products in Asia in sweatshop conditions.
NEWS
June 1, 1995 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Troubled sneaker maker Vans Inc. said Wednesday that it will close its plant here at the end of July, throwing about 1,000 employees out of work and ending a rocky chapter in the longtime Southern California company's history. Vans, one of the few companies still manufacturing shoes in the United States, linked the long-rumored closing to increased competition from lower-cost foreign producers and an inability to make its more popular models here because of environmental restrictions.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Few if any of the 200 workers who turned out for a union rally in front of Vans Inc. shoe company believed they could stop the closing of their plant Monday, but Teamsters officials were not about to let it happen quietly. "It's a long shot," said Teamsters official Raul Lopez of a letter presented to the company Wednesday appealing for a last meeting. "But being the Teamsters, we're going to go down swinging."
BUSINESS
June 1, 1995 | DAN MARGOLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Word that Vans Inc. will close its massive manufacturing plant in Orange was more than just bad news for Sylvia Garibay. It was a family crisis. Not only will Garibay, a 17-year production line veteran, lose her job, but so will four of her sisters, each of whom has spent more than a decade in the aging and dusty factory permeated by the smell of adhesives and rubber products.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1995 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vans Inc. said Thursday that it has consented to a new union election as part of an agreement to settle federal charges that the sneaker maker interfered with a union vote last year. Under the settlement, in which Vans did not admit to any wrongdoing, the National Labor Relations Board will hold an election on June 30 at the company's factory in Orange. About 1,000 production workers will be eligible to cast ballots for or against the Teamsters union.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1995 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Efforts to settle a long-running dispute between Vans Inc. and the Teamsters Union broke down Thursday, setting the stage for a trial next month on allegations that the shoemaker violated numerous labor laws to stifle an organizing drive at its factory in Orange. The National Labor Relations Board in Los Angeles called the meeting in the hopes of averting a trial set for May 1.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1997 | Associated Press
A violent union protest involving nearly 5,000 workers at an Indonesian factory that makes shoes for Nike Inc. was resolved after the owner, PT Hardaya Aneka Shoe Industry, agreed to a 10.7% pay increase, a Nike spokesman said. Angry workers at the factory outside Jakarta said they were not being paid Indonesia's $2.50-a-day minimum wage, but Nike said they receive more than that. The Beaverton, Ore.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1997 | Associated Press
Teen-age girls paid 20 cents an hour to make $180 Nike sneakers are worked to exhaustion and fondled by their supervisors at Vietnam factories, a labor activist said. "Supervisors humiliate women, force them to kneel, to stand in the hot sun, treating them like recruits in boot camp," said Thuyen Nguyen, founder of Vietnam Labor Watch. Beaverton, Ore.-based Nike Inc. said it suspended one plant manager for forcing women to run laps.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Few if any of the 200 workers who turned out for a union rally in front of Vans Inc. shoe company believed they could stop the closing of their plant Monday, but Teamsters officials were not about to let it happen quietly. "It's a long shot," said Teamsters official Raul Lopez of a letter presented to the company Wednesday appealing for a last meeting. "But being the Teamsters, we're going to go down swinging."
NEWS
June 1, 1995 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Troubled sneaker maker Vans Inc. said Wednesday that it will close its plant here at the end of July, throwing about 1,000 employees out of work and ending a rocky chapter in the longtime Southern California company's history. Vans, one of the few companies still manufacturing shoes in the United States, linked the long-rumored closing to increased competition from lower-cost foreign producers and an inability to make its more popular models here because of environmental restrictions.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1995 | DAN MARGOLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Word that Vans Inc. will close its massive manufacturing plant in Orange was more than just bad news for Sylvia Garibay. It was a family crisis. Not only will Garibay, a 17-year production line veteran, lose her job, but so will four of her sisters, each of whom has spent more than a decade in the aging and dusty factory permeated by the smell of adhesives and rubber products.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1995 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vans Inc. said Thursday that it has consented to a new union election as part of an agreement to settle federal charges that the sneaker maker interfered with a union vote last year. Under the settlement, in which Vans did not admit to any wrongdoing, the National Labor Relations Board will hold an election on June 30 at the company's factory in Orange. About 1,000 production workers will be eligible to cast ballots for or against the Teamsters union.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1997 | Reuters
Fifteen U.S. women's groups, author Alice Walker and U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles), who heads the Congressional Black Caucus, joined forces to put pressure on Nike Inc. to improve conditions for its workers in Asia. The groups on Monday took issue with Nike's latest advertising campaign, which features women empowered by athletics, saying Nike's treatment of Asian factory workers--most of whom are young women--must improve if U.S. women are to buy Nike products in good conscience.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1997 | Associated Press
A violent union protest involving nearly 5,000 workers at an Indonesian factory that makes shoes for Nike Inc. was resolved after the owner, PT Hardaya Aneka Shoe Industry, agreed to a 10.7% pay increase, a Nike spokesman said. Angry workers at the factory outside Jakarta said they were not being paid Indonesia's $2.50-a-day minimum wage, but Nike said they receive more than that. The Beaverton, Ore.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1995 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Efforts to settle a long-running dispute between Vans Inc. and the Teamsters Union broke down Thursday, setting the stage for a trial next month on allegations that the shoemaker violated numerous labor laws to stifle an organizing drive at its factory in Orange. The National Labor Relations Board in Los Angeles called the meeting in the hopes of averting a trial set for May 1.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Vans Inc. said Tuesday it has laid off 380 workers at its two factories in Southern California and Teamsters Union representatives complained that the employees likely were those who favor union representation at the company's plants in Orange and Vista. Christopher Staff, president of the Orange-based casual shoe company, disputed the union's allegations, maintaining that the workers were let go because more of the company's shoes are being produced at manufacturing facilities abroad.
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