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January 23, 1992 | Chris Woodyard / Times staff writer
Keeping Pace: Americans, it seems, have seen every fancy sneaker that ever squeaked across a hardwood basketball court, trotted across the living room carpet or chased down a wandering toddler. That may be part of the reasoning behind the Walking Store, which just opened at MainPlace/Santa Ana. Finally, a place to walk, not run. Or should it even be called walking? These days, the cool thing to say is "striding."
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BUSINESS
October 21, 1999 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oakley Inc. said Wednesday it will restructure its money-losing footwear business, turning to outside manufacturers to make its shoes. The Foothill Ranch-based company, which is largely known for its sport-related sunglasses, ventured into the shoe business last year with an eye-catching $125 high-top that sold so poorly it has since been discontinued.
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BUSINESS
October 20, 1998 | LESLIE EARNEST, Leslie Earnest covers retail businesses and restaurants for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-7832 and at leslie.earnest@latimes.com
How are Oakley Inc.'s new athletic shoes selling? The jury, it appears, is still out. The Foothill Ranch company, best known for its upscale sunglasses, has not released sales numbers since it jumped into the competitive athletic shoe market this year. But spokeswoman Renee Law said Oakley is satisfied with the public's initial response to its new product. "We have had a limited quantity in the market," she said. "But we're really pleased with [sales] and the responses we've had from retailers."
BUSINESS
October 20, 1998 | LESLIE EARNEST, Leslie Earnest covers retail businesses and restaurants for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-7832 and at leslie.earnest@latimes.com
How are Oakley Inc.'s new athletic shoes selling? The jury, it appears, is still out. The Foothill Ranch company, best known for its upscale sunglasses, has not released sales numbers since it jumped into the competitive athletic shoe market this year. But spokeswoman Renee Law said Oakley is satisfied with the public's initial response to its new product. "We have had a limited quantity in the market," she said. "But we're really pleased with [sales] and the responses we've had from retailers."
BUSINESS
October 21, 1999 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oakley Inc. said Wednesday it will restructure its money-losing footwear business, turning to outside manufacturers to make its shoes. The Foothill Ranch-based company, which is largely known for its sport-related sunglasses, ventured into the shoe business last year with an eye-catching $125 high-top that sold so poorly it has since been discontinued.
BUSINESS
January 21, 1993 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shoemaker Ohannes Topchian pulls red leather onto the shoe sole with precision. Using a small hammer, he taps as he stretches the leather onto the last, a plastic form shaped like a foot. Lasting shoes by hand is nearly a lost art in the United States--and Cypress Footwear Inc. in Buena Park, a manufacturer and retailer of women's shoes, is carving out a market niche as one of the few companies that still does it the old-fashioned way. "That's a talent.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1993 | CHRIS WOODYARD and MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A day after immigration authorities arrested 233 workers at Vans Inc., company officials said that production lines were moving again Friday despite the loss of a 10th of its work force. All but 14 of those arrested Thursday agreed to deportation shortly after being taken into custody Thursday at the sneaker maker's headquarters in Orange. Nine were released, most because they have petitions pending to become U.S. citizens. Another five refused deportation and demanded hearings.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1993 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shoemaker Ohannes Topchian pulls red leather onto the shoe sole with precision. Using a small hammer, he taps as he stretches the leather onto the last, a plastic form shaped like a foot. Lasting shoes by hand is nearly a lost art in America--and Cypress Footwear Inc. in Buena Park, a manufacturer and retailer of women's shoes, is carving out a market niche as one of the few companies that still does it the old-fashioned way. "That's a talent.
BUSINESS
January 21, 1993 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shoemaker Ohannes Topchian pulls red leather onto the shoe sole with precision. Using a small hammer, he taps as he stretches the leather onto the last, a plastic form shaped like a foot. Lasting shoes by hand is nearly a lost art in the United States--and Cypress Footwear Inc. in Buena Park, a manufacturer and retailer of women's shoes, is carving out a market niche as one of the few companies that still does it the old-fashioned way. "That's a talent.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1993 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shoemaker Ohannes Topchian pulls red leather onto the shoe sole with precision. Using a small hammer, he taps as he stretches the leather onto the last, a plastic form shaped like a foot. Lasting shoes by hand is nearly a lost art in America--and Cypress Footwear Inc. in Buena Park, a manufacturer and retailer of women's shoes, is carving out a market niche as one of the few companies that still does it the old-fashioned way. "That's a talent.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1993 | CHRIS WOODYARD and MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A day after immigration authorities arrested 233 workers at Vans Inc., company officials said that production lines were moving again Friday despite the loss of a 10th of its work force. All but 14 of those arrested Thursday agreed to deportation shortly after being taken into custody Thursday at the sneaker maker's headquarters in Orange. Nine were released, most because they have petitions pending to become U.S. citizens. Another five refused deportation and demanded hearings.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1992 | Chris Woodyard / Times staff writer
Keeping Pace: Americans, it seems, have seen every fancy sneaker that ever squeaked across a hardwood basketball court, trotted across the living room carpet or chased down a wandering toddler. That may be part of the reasoning behind the Walking Store, which just opened at MainPlace/Santa Ana. Finally, a place to walk, not run. Or should it even be called walking? These days, the cool thing to say is "striding."
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