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Shoe Industry United States

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BUSINESS
March 13, 1994 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's midwinter, and another layer of snow has just fallen on frigid Buffalo, N.Y. But Ron Pecci, a Franciscan priest, is wearing sandals as he navigates the snowdrifts that ring St. Rita and St. Patrick churches. "With socks, sandals are warm enough to wear year-round," Pecci says. "Unless it's really cold rain, it doesn't matter. And I wear them in the winter as long as the snow is clean."
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BUSINESS
May 6, 2000 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Too many shoes, too many stores and no Michael Jordan-powered basketball championships left the casual shoe industry playing like the Los Angeles Clippers last year--down and out. But in recent months, the industry, which relies on athletic shoe sales, is posting a rebound that basketball bad boy Dennis Rodman would be proud of--strong, but quirky. Shares of Skechers USA Inc.
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BUSINESS
March 6, 1994 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's midwinter, and another layer of snow has just fallen on frigid Buffalo, N.Y. But Ron Pecci, a Franciscan priest, is wearing sandals as he navigates the snowdrifts that ring Sts. Rita and Patrick Church. "With socks, sandals are warm enough to wear year-round," Pecci said. "Unless it's really cold rain, it doesn't matter. And I wear them in the winter as long as the snow is clean."
BUSINESS
September 20, 1996 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
L.A. Gear Inc. has been getting a real workout these days. The company that gave America the lighted sneaker is being shoved aside by stronger competitors such as Nike, the industry's powerhouse, and up-and-coming trendy brands such as Fila. Key athletic shoe retailers are dumping the brand, saying not enough people want it. Though it continues to sell L.A. Gear kids' shoes, FootAction stopped stocking the brand's flagship women's shoes six months ago and dropped L.A.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1992 | Chris Woodyard / Times staff writer
What's in Name Brand: Vans Inc. has prided itself on its refusal to sell its fancy sneakers to discounters and mass merchandisers. You won't find a pair of Vans for sale at Sears or K mart because, as executives are quick to point out, it would alienate the full-price, upscale sellers such as Nordstrom department stores. But rather than pass up what could become a significant chunk of new business, the Orange-based sneaker maker has created a private label division.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1992 | ANDREA MAIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ken Craig calls them "shoe freaks," and he recognizes them as soon as they walk into his Athlete's Foot store in Santa Monica. They're not afraid to wear bright colors, particularly on one of the dozens of pairs of athletic shoes they own. And they're eager to talk tech, to debate the ins and outs of graphite inserts, air-filled soles, pumps, gels, hexalite cushions and polyurethane mid soles.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1988 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
The House on Friday gave final passage to legislation tightening limits on imports of textiles, clothing and shoes and sent it to the White House for certain veto by President Reagan. The 248-150 vote fell short of the two-thirds margin necessary to override a veto, and House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) conceded the measure's survival was "doubtful."
BUSINESS
September 4, 1991 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an age when lavish advertising for athletic shoes has every child dreaming of pumping up inflatable footwear or thinking more of Bo Jackson's Nikes than his athletic prowess, it hardly seems as though there would be room for another sneaker. But one Japanese-owned shoemaker says it is thriving as it jockeys for position among 39 name brands in the $6-billion U.S. market for athletic footwear. Asics Tiger Corp. in Fountain Valley, the U.S.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | COLLETTE O'CONNOR, Collette O'Connor is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
Emsa Harding, a fashion victim at age 9, was shot down one day at Santa Ana's Greenville Elementary School. The humiliation of this crash-and-burn still turns his face a hot red color. "I came to school in slip-ons painted with sayings like 'chill out,' 'I'm bad,' 'cool'--all the weird things," he recalls with appropriate drama for his audience, 15 sympathetic classmates who gathered around like a mini-support group to re-live the war story.
BUSINESS
January 21, 1993 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shoemaker Ohannes Topchian pulls red leather onto the shoe sole with precision. Using a small hammer, he taps as he stretches the leather onto the last, a plastic form shaped like a foot. Lasting shoes by hand is nearly a lost art in the United States--and Cypress Footwear Inc. in Buena Park, a manufacturer and retailer of women's shoes, is carving out a market niche as one of the few companies that still does it the old-fashioned way. "That's a talent.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1994 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's midwinter, and another layer of snow has just fallen on frigid Buffalo, N.Y. But Ron Pecci, a Franciscan priest, is wearing sandals as he navigates the snowdrifts that ring St. Rita and St. Patrick churches. "With socks, sandals are warm enough to wear year-round," Pecci says. "Unless it's really cold rain, it doesn't matter. And I wear them in the winter as long as the snow is clean."
BUSINESS
March 6, 1994 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's midwinter, and another layer of snow has just fallen on frigid Buffalo, N.Y. But Ron Pecci, a Franciscan priest, is wearing sandals as he navigates the snowdrifts that ring Sts. Rita and Patrick Church. "With socks, sandals are warm enough to wear year-round," Pecci said. "Unless it's really cold rain, it doesn't matter. And I wear them in the winter as long as the snow is clean."
BUSINESS
January 21, 1993 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shoemaker Ohannes Topchian pulls red leather onto the shoe sole with precision. Using a small hammer, he taps as he stretches the leather onto the last, a plastic form shaped like a foot. Lasting shoes by hand is nearly a lost art in the United States--and Cypress Footwear Inc. in Buena Park, a manufacturer and retailer of women's shoes, is carving out a market niche as one of the few companies that still does it the old-fashioned way. "That's a talent.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1993 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shoemaker Ohannes Topchian pulls red leather onto the shoe sole with precision. Using a small hammer, he taps as he stretches the leather onto the last, a plastic form shaped like a foot. Lasting shoes by hand is nearly a lost art in America--and Cypress Footwear Inc. in Buena Park, a manufacturer and retailer of women's shoes, is carving out a market niche as one of the few companies that still does it the old-fashioned way. "That's a talent.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1992 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the fashion-craze U.S. sneaker market, K-Swiss Inc. is an anomaly. Eschewing glitz and glamour, the Pacoima-based firm has instead relied largely on one plain, white 26-year-old tennis shoe. No superstar endorsements. No sexy television ads. The strategy has worked. It's also helped that the domestic sport shoe market surged in the past five years, averaging 15% growth annually.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1992 | DANIEL AKST
Of course the setting is bucolic. Naturally, while you wait, you pick up Vegetarian Times from the coffee table. And it almost goes without saying, as you dream carnivorous dreams and vow to see if the cafeteria serves tofu, that people walk by wearing smiles and Birkenstocks. But enough snickering. The fact is that Birkenstocks come in sizes up to 17. The cafeteria serves meat. And if you think these sandals are for wimps, don't say so around Gen. H.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2000 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Too many shoes, too many stores and no Michael Jordan-powered basketball championships left the casual shoe industry playing like the Los Angeles Clippers last year--down and out. But in recent months, the industry, which relies on athletic shoe sales, is posting a rebound that basketball bad boy Dennis Rodman would be proud of--strong, but quirky. Shares of Skechers USA Inc.
NEWS
July 15, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you want to see why Congress is reluctant to cut off China's trade privileges in this country, just check out the shelves of the closest shoe store or the nearest Toys R Us. About 38% of all the shoes sold in this country now come from China. Representatives of American footwear distributors--including brand names such as Reebok and retailers such as Sears, Roebuck & Co.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1992 | Chris Woodyard / Times staff writer
What's in Name Brand: Vans Inc. has prided itself on its refusal to sell its fancy sneakers to discounters and mass merchandisers. You won't find a pair of Vans for sale at Sears or K mart because, as executives are quick to point out, it would alienate the full-price, upscale sellers such as Nordstrom department stores. But rather than pass up what could become a significant chunk of new business, the Orange-based sneaker maker has created a private label division.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1992 | ANDREA MAIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ken Craig calls them "shoe freaks," and he recognizes them as soon as they walk into his Athlete's Foot store in Santa Monica. They're not afraid to wear bright colors, particularly on one of the dozens of pairs of athletic shoes they own. And they're eager to talk tech, to debate the ins and outs of graphite inserts, air-filled soles, pumps, gels, hexalite cushions and polyurethane mid soles.
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