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November 15, 2009 | Adam Tschorn
In sneakerhead parlance, the term "Holy Grail" refers to a collector's ultimate wish list -- NiceKicks.com's founder and editor in chief Matt Halfhill likens it to a "bucket list" of sorts: the things you want to experience before you die. "Every sneakerhead has one," he says. "Sometimes, when they post in [online] sneaker forums, you'll see the list at the bottom with check marks next to the ones they've already gotten." The coveted sneaks aren't just the elusive ones you haven't found yet, explains Liz Sanchez, manager of the Holy Grail, the aptly named sneaker consignment boutique on Pico in downtown Los Angeles.
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November 15, 2009 | Melissa Magsaysay
Shoes this fall are bold and daring. Whether they are flats, wedges or stilettos, or strappy, zippered or studded, they don't just sit there quietly waiting to be noticed. They distinctly shout, "Look at me!" These new styles can instantly update a wardrobe, making even old staples feel new. Among the most prominent trends: ankle boots, punky metal decorations and the color red. Red is on fire, both in clothing and footwear, and shoe designers are offering it in different shapes and price points.
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November 15, 2009 | Melissa Magsaysay
Shoes this fall are bold and daring. Whether they are flats, wedges or stilettos, or strappy, zippered or studded, they don't just sit there quietly waiting to be noticed. They distinctly shout, "Look at me!" These new styles can instantly update a wardrobe, making even old staples feel new. Among the most prominent trends: ankle boots, punky metal decorations and the color red. Red is on fire, both in clothing and footwear, and shoe designers are offering it in different shapes and price points.
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November 15, 2009 | Julie Neigher
Here's the cliche: Men slumped over seats in cushy boutiques giving compulsory nods while women shop for shoes. Laden with shopping bags, the sticker-shocked males stumble out of the store, pondering all the other things on which they could have spent their money. Like rent. But that's the modern cliche. It wasn't always thus. According to the author of "The Essence of Style," Joan DeJean, "The transformation of the shoe industry that made possible the current craze for luxe footwear began during Louis XIV's reign . . . because the Sun King himself was a shoe addict of the first order."
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November 15, 2009 | Julie Neigher
Here's the cliche: Men slumped over seats in cushy boutiques giving compulsory nods while women shop for shoes. Laden with shopping bags, the sticker-shocked males stumble out of the store, pondering all the other things on which they could have spent their money. Like rent. But that's the modern cliche. It wasn't always thus. According to the author of "The Essence of Style," Joan DeJean, "The transformation of the shoe industry that made possible the current craze for luxe footwear began during Louis XIV's reign . . . because the Sun King himself was a shoe addict of the first order."
IMAGE
November 15, 2009 | Adam Tschorn
Many fashion fiends wouldn't think twice about shelling out nearly as much as a mortgage payment for Manolos or maxing out the charge card for Choos, but they scratch their heads when they see kids queued up around the block for athletic shoes. What could make a pair of second-hand basketball shoes be worth $6,000? The motivations really aren't that different: limited supply, huge demand, marketing mystique and an emotional attachment that transcends dollar value. That's why Los Angeles sneaker cognoscenti think a certain long-rumored, highly anticipated reissue of a sneaker that last saw store shelves nine years ago could end up as one of the most sought-after pairs of kicks this year.
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November 15, 2009 | BOOTH MOORE, FASHION CRITIC
Roopal Patel, senior fashion accessories editor for Neiman Marcus, hit the mark during a customer lunch with shoe designer Bruno Frisoni last month: "God created a special emotion," she said, "for when women walk into a shoe store." It's the same emotion that led Beverly Hills resident Renges Fabris to construct a special cabinet for her footwear collection, designed so that when the doors open, the song "If Loving You Is Wrong, I Don't Want to Be Right" starts to play. Fabris knows exactly why, like so many other women, she adores shoes.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1997 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investors stomped on shares of athletic-shoe makers again Thursday after Reebok International Ltd. provided fresh evidence that the $12-billion U.S. sneaker market remains caught in a major slowdown. Stocks of Reebok, industry leader Nike Inc., Converse Inc. and other leading players in the industry have been sliding all year amid growing signs that sales were going flat.
SPORTS
August 11, 2010 | Chris Foster
End Datone Jones broke his right foot in practice Monday, leaving UCLA without one of its best defensive players until at least October. Jones was injured during an individual drill on the artificial surface at the Bruins' practice facility. He was taken to the hospital for X-rays. "We'll have to wait and see the significance," Coach Rick Neuheisel said. "He just took a step, which caused the deal. He was wearing the same shoes he wears all the time, so it wasn't a shoe issue.
SPORTS
May 9, 2012 | By Baxter Holmes
  Memphis had a huge lead. At home. In the playoffs. Against the Clippers. And it began to slowly and surely fade… Again. The second half of Wednesday's Game 5 at FedEx Forum sure looked a lot like the one in Game 1 of the Western Conference first-round playoff series between these two teams, when the Clippers pulled off a one-point win in the same building after trailing by as many as 27. But the comparisons can end there.
IMAGE
November 15, 2009 | Adam Tschorn
Many fashion fiends wouldn't think twice about shelling out nearly as much as a mortgage payment for Manolos or maxing out the charge card for Choos, but they scratch their heads when they see kids queued up around the block for athletic shoes. What could make a pair of second-hand basketball shoes be worth $6,000? The motivations really aren't that different: limited supply, huge demand, marketing mystique and an emotional attachment that transcends dollar value. That's why Los Angeles sneaker cognoscenti think a certain long-rumored, highly anticipated reissue of a sneaker that last saw store shelves nine years ago could end up as one of the most sought-after pairs of kicks this year.
IMAGE
November 15, 2009 | Adam Tschorn
In sneakerhead parlance, the term "Holy Grail" refers to a collector's ultimate wish list -- NiceKicks.com's founder and editor in chief Matt Halfhill likens it to a "bucket list" of sorts: the things you want to experience before you die. "Every sneakerhead has one," he says. "Sometimes, when they post in [online] sneaker forums, you'll see the list at the bottom with check marks next to the ones they've already gotten." The coveted sneaks aren't just the elusive ones you haven't found yet, explains Liz Sanchez, manager of the Holy Grail, the aptly named sneaker consignment boutique on Pico in downtown Los Angeles.
IMAGE
November 15, 2009 | BOOTH MOORE, FASHION CRITIC
Roopal Patel, senior fashion accessories editor for Neiman Marcus, hit the mark during a customer lunch with shoe designer Bruno Frisoni last month: "God created a special emotion," she said, "for when women walk into a shoe store." It's the same emotion that led Beverly Hills resident Renges Fabris to construct a special cabinet for her footwear collection, designed so that when the doors open, the song "If Loving You Is Wrong, I Don't Want to Be Right" starts to play. Fabris knows exactly why, like so many other women, she adores shoes.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1997 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investors stomped on shares of athletic-shoe makers again Thursday after Reebok International Ltd. provided fresh evidence that the $12-billion U.S. sneaker market remains caught in a major slowdown. Stocks of Reebok, industry leader Nike Inc., Converse Inc. and other leading players in the industry have been sliding all year amid growing signs that sales were going flat.
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